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A HISTOKY 



OP 



MASSACHUSETTS IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



BT 

WILLIAM SCHOULER, 

LATB ADJUTANT-OBHBBAL OF THB COMM OBWBALTH. 



Vol. II. 

TOWNS AND CITIES. 



BOSTON: 

PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHOR. 

89, KiLBY Street, Boston. 

1871. 




Entered accordiog to Act of Congress, in the year 1871, by 

WILLIAM SCHOULKB, 

In the office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington. 






> ■ 






/"> 






cambbidgb: 
press of johji wilsoir akd soit. 



TO 



MRS. HARRISON GRAY OTIS, 

OF BOSTON; 

WHOSE ORACIOUB DEEDS AND KUXD W0BD8, WHOSE UNBEMITTIXO CHBIBTIAX AND 

PATBIOnO SXBTI0B8 IK BEHALF OF THE SOLDIERS AKD SAILORS 

OF MASAACHUSETTS AKD OF THEIB FAMILIES DX7BIKO 

THE LATE CITIL WAB, 

AKD 

WHOSE HEBOIC SELF-DEVOTION TO THE TBUE IKTEBESTS OF THE NATION IN THE 

YEABS OF ITS OBEATBBT PEBIL, HAVE MADE THE NAME OF OTIS AS 

INSEPARABLE FBOM THE CAUSE OF THE UNION AND THE 

coNsnruTJON as fbom the colonial stbuoole 

FOB FRMEDOM AND INDBPBNDBNCS, 

TBm BOOK IS bespxotfvllt dedicated bt the AUTHOB, 

WILLIAM SCHOULEB. 



PREFACE. 



In the Preface to the first volume of this work, published in 
1868, I gave a conditional promise to write two additional vol- 
umes ; one to be devoted exclusively to the three-years regiments 
and batteries, and one to the meetings held in the several cities 
and towns in the Commonwealth, ** to encourage recruiting, to 
raise money, and to provide for the support and sustenance of 
the families of the soldiers.'' The present volume is in part a 
fulfilment of that conditional promise, and is devoted exclusively 
to the intense and unwearied devotion of the entire people of the 
Commonwealth, regardless of sex or party, to the cause of the 
country during the whole period of the Rebellion. The third vol- 
ume, if it should be written, would complete the entire scope of 
my original design ; namely, three volumes, — the first devoted 
to what was done by the Commonwealth as a State, the second 
to the cities and towns, and the third to the three-years regi- 
ments and batteries while at the front, as exhibited by the 
reports, letters, and other material on file at the State House, 
and obtained from private sources, of which there is a vast 
accumulation. As evidence of this, there are in the State House 
eighty volumes of correspondence, each volume containing five 
hundred pages, written by Governor Andrew during the war ; 
and eighty-three volumes, or upwards of forty-one thousand 

pages, of correspondence writtten by the Adjutant General dur- 

h 



VI PREFACE. 

ing the same period, and containing upwards of thirty-five 
thousand letters, upon every conceivable subject having relation 
directly or indirectly to the war. These letters were written, in 
a majority of cases, in reply to letters and reports received from 
officers and enlisted men at the front, from the city and town au- 
thorities, and from the families of soldiers in the Commonwealth. 
The letters written by Governor Andrew, and reports made by 
his personal staff, were freely used in the first volume of this 
work, as also in part those written by the Adjutant General and 
Surgeon General. But the letters and reports received from 
the front, from our regiments and batteries, which are on file at 
the State House, and which contain a vast amount of interesting 
and important facts and details, are the principal storehouse 
firom which the historian would draw in writing the third 
volume. 

The Adjutant General's Beports during the years of the war 
give a separate, distinct, and correct narrative of each regiment 
and battery from the day it led the State until it returned ; so 
that a person having a complete set of the reports will have no 
difficulty Jn following each command from the beginning to the 
dose of its gallant service. These narratives were necessarily 
bare outlines of marches, battles, and camp life. The reports 
and letters on file at the State House, and the diousands of pri- 
vate Bnd unofficial letters at hand, would furnish ample material 
to fill up these outlines and give to them a compact and sym- 
metrical form. 

My purpose has been to make each volume of this history dis- 
tinct and complete of itself. This volume, as I have in another 
place remarked, contains the war proceedings of what Mr. Web- 
ster called **the small assemblies of the towns.'* They show the 
unanimity and fervor which everywhere pervaded their deliber- 
ations, as well as the liberality, sound judgment, and undaunted 
patriotism which characterized their action. They show that 



PREFACE. Vll 

Massachusetts was the same ^ in town-meeting assembled " as 
she was at the front and on the sea, in the halls of her State 
Legislature, in the halls of Congress, and in the Council Cham- 
ber of her Great Executive. 

In presenting this volume to the public, I would state that it 
is the result of nearly three years of incessant and often per- 
plexed labor ; and that my constant aim, from the inception of 
the work until its completion, was to be truthful and accurate. 
I hope that in both respects I have been moderately successful, 
although perfect accuracy, under all the circumstances attend- 
ing the collection, examination and analysis of very large 
masses of original manuscripts, was barely possible. . 

To the city and town clerks, selectmen, treasurers, and others 
who have assisted me in the collection of material from which 
this book has in a great part been written, I tender my sincere 
acknowledgments . 

That the book may be favorably received by the sons and 
daughters of Massachusetts, and add to the respect entertained 
for our Commonwealth by good and true people everywhere, is 
my sincere desire. 

William Schguler. 

Boston, September, 1871. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 
Introductory and Explanatory 1 

CHAPTER 11. 

Barnstable County 26 

Barnstable, Brewster, Chatham, Dennis, Eastham, Falmouth, Harwich, 
Orleans, Provincetown, Sandwich, Truro, Wellfleet, Yarmouth. 



CHAPTER m. 

Berkshire County 59 

Adams, Alford, Becket, Cheshire, Clarksburg, Dalton, Egremont, 
Florida, Great Barrington, Hancock, Hinsdale, Lanesborough, Lee, 
Lenox, Monterey, Mount Washington, New Ashford, New Marl- 
borough, Otis, Peru, Pittsfield, Richmond, Sandisfield, Savoy, 
Sheffield, Stockbridge, Tjringham, Washington, West Stockbridge, 
Williamstown, Windsor. 

CHAPTER IV. 

Bristol County 115 

Acushnet, Attleborough, Berkley, Dartmouth, Dighton, Easton, Fair- 
haven, Fall River, Freetown, Mansfield, New Bedford, Norton, 
Raynham, Rehoboth, Seekonk, Somerset, Swanzey, Taunton, West- 
port 




CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER V. 

Dukes County 164 

Chilmark, Edgartown, Gosnold, Tbbury. 

CHAPTER VI. 

Essex County 171 

Amesburj, Andover, Beverly, Boxford, Bradford, Danvers, Essex, 
Georgetown, Gloucester, Groveland, Hamilton, Haverhill, Ipswich, 
Lawrence, Lynn, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Mcthuen, 
Middleton, Nahant, Newbury, Newburyport, North Andover, Rock- 
port, Rowley, Salem, Salisbury, Saugos, South Danvers (Peabody), 
Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, West Newbury. 

CHAPTER Vn. 

Franklin County 253 

Ashfield, Bemardston, Buckland, Charlemont, Colerain, Conway, 
Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, Leverett, Ley- 
den, Monroe, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Rowe, 
Shelbume, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, Whately. 

CHAPTER VHL 

Hampden County 293 

Agawam, Blandford, Brimfield, Chester, Chicopee, Granville, Holland, 
Holyoke, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, Montgomery, Palmer, 
Russell, Southwick, Springfield, Tolland, Wales, Westfield, West 
Springfield, Wilbraham. 

CHAPTER IX. 

Hampshibe Cottntt 330 

Amherst, Belchertown, Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, En- 
field, Goshen, Granby, Greenwich, Hadley, Hatfield, Huntington, 



CONTENTS. XI 

Middlefield, Northampton, Pelham, Flainfield, Prescott, South Had- 
lej, Southampton, Ware, Westhampton, Williamsburg, Worthing- 
ton. 

CHAPTER X. 

Middlesex Countt 366 

Acton, Ashbj, Ashland, Bedford, Belmont, Billerica, Boxborough, 
Brighton, Burlington, Cambridge, Carlisle, Charlestown, Chelms- 
ford, Concord, Dracut, Dunstable, Framingham, Groton, Holliston, 
Hopkinton, Lexington, Lincoln, Littleton, Lowell, Maiden, Marl- 
borough, Medford, Melrose, Natick, Newton, North Reading, Pep- 
perell, Reading, Sherbom, Shirley, Somerville, South Reading 
(Wakefield), Stoneham, Stow, Sudbury, Tewksbury, Townsend, 
Tyngsborough, Waltham, Watertown, Wayland, West Cambridge 
(Arlington), Westford, Weston, Wilmington, Winchester, Wobum. 



CHAPTER XI. 

Nantucket County 478 

]>^antucket. 

CHAPTER Xn. 

Norfolk County 481 

Bellingham, Braintree, Brooklinc, Canton, Cohasset, Dedham, Dor- 
chester, Dover, Foxborough, Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Milton, 
Needham, Quincy, Randolph, Roxbury, Sharon, Stoughton, Wal- 
pole. West Roxbury, Weymouth, Wrentham. 



CHAPTER XHL 

Plymouth County 535 

Abington, Bridgewater, Carver, Duxbury, East Bridgewater, Halifax, 
Hanson, Hanover, Hingham, Hull, Kingston, Lakeville, Marion, 
Marshfield, Mattapoisett, Middleborough, North Bridgewater, Pem- 
broke, Plymouth, Plympton, Rochester, Scituate, South Scituate, 
Wareham, West Bridgewater. 




XU CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER XIV. 

Suffolk County 581 

Boston, Chelsea, North Chelsea, Winthrop. 



CHAPTER XV. 

Worcester County 602 

Ashbumham, Athol, Auburn, Barre, Berlin, Blackstone, Bolton, Boyl- 
ston, Brookfield, Charlton, Clinton, Dana, Douglas, Dudley, Fitch- 
burg, Gardner, Grafton, Hardwick, Harvard, Holden, Hubbardston, 
Lancaster, Leicester, Leominster, Lunenburg, Mendon, Milford, 
Millbury, New Braintree, Northborough, Northbridge, North Brook- 
field, Oakham, Oxford, Paxton, Petersham, Phillipston, Princeton, 
Boyalston, Rutland, Shrewsbury, Southborough, Southbridge, Spen- 
cer, Sterling, Sturbridge, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge, 
Warren, Webster, Westborough, West Boylston, West Brookfield, 
Westminster, Winchendon, Worcester. 



CIVIL AND aULITARY mSTORY 



OF 



MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION 






CHAPTER I. 

INTRODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 

Often during the four years of the late civil war we were 
; :: reminded of the words of Mr. Webster in a speech made by him 
in the Massachusetts Convention of 1820 for the amendment 
of the Constitution of this Commonwealth. They are as fol- 
lows : — 



I 



[. ^ I would not* be thought to be among those who underrate the 
y yalue of military service. My heart beats, I trust, as responsive as 
1^ any one's to a soldier's claim for honor or renown. It has ever been 
t my opinion, however, that, while celebrating the military achievements 
of oar countrymen in the Revolutionary contest, we have not always- 
done equal justice to the merits and the sufferings of those who sus- 
tained, in their property and in their means of subsistence, the great 
burden of the war. Any one who has had occasion to be acquainted 
with the records of the New-England towns knows well how to esti- 
mate those merits and those sufferings. Nobler records of patriotism 
exist nowhere. Nowhere can there be found higher proofs of a spirit 
that was ready to hazard all, to pledge all, to sacrifice all, in the cause 
of the couutry. Instances were not unfrequent in which small free- 
holders parted with their last hoof, and last measure of corn from their 
granaries, to supply provisiions for the troops, and hire service for the 
ranks. The voice of Otis and of Adams, in Faueuil Hall, found its full 
and true echo in the little councils of the interior towns : and, if within 

1 



2 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

the Continental Congress patriotism shone more conspicuously, it did 
not there exist more truly, nor burn more fervently ; it did not render 
the day more anxious, nor the night more sleepless ; it sent up no more 
ardent prayer to Grod for succor ; and it put forth in no greater degree 
the fulness of its effort, and the energy of its whole soul and spirit, 
in the common cause, — than it did in the small assemblies of the 
towns." 

We read these words long years ago ; and they had become, 
as it were, fastened upon our memory before the late civil contest 
had assumed a warlike front. We believed that they presented 
a true state of facts respecting the Revolutionary period, as we 
know that they possess a marvellous accuracy when applied to 
" the small assemblies of the towns " of Massachusetts during 
the late Rebellion. 

In what we shall say on this or any other point, no one, we 
trust, will understand us as asserting that too much credit has 
been awarded to the soldiers of the Union army for the ser- 
vices they have performed, or too much sympathy and honor 
been given them for the sufferings they have endured, and the 
sacrifices they have made ; for, in our judgment, they have not 
received their full award of credit, nor their full share of sympa- 
thy and honor. 

The purpose of this volume is to present a compact and 
faithful record of what our towns did, during 'the late war, to 
aid the cause with which the future name and well-being of this 
nation were so closely allied ; and also to preserve, and rescue 
from neglect, the names of gentlemen whose official positions 
imposed upon them many new and untried duties, which they 
performed with an energy unsurpassed, and a faithfulness which 
merits the thankful acknowledgment of all good people. 

We are not aware that a volume of a character precisely like 
this has ever before been written. Although the material for 
such a work, showing the action of the local town governments 
during the Revolutionary war, may still exist in the archives 
of many of our towns, yet we fear that, in the lapse of years 
which now separate us from that memorable period, many of 
the records have become mutilated, and in some instances par- 
tially or entirely lost. No systematic attempt, to our knowl- 



INTRODUCTORT AND EXPLANATORY. 3 

edge, was ever made to gather them together, combine them 
in a volume, and present them in an intelligible and compact 
form for the information of the general public, or for the more 
limited purpose of being used by the lover of antiquarian re- 
search, or the student of American Revolutionary history. Had 
they been, we believe they would in a remarkable degree have 
sustained the opinion expressed by Mr. Webster in the extract 
from the speech which we have quoted at the commencement 
of this chapter, and to which, in a great part, this volume owes 
its origin. 

But, whatever matters of historical interest the town records 
of the Revolutionary era may contain, they must be deficient in 
many important and interesting facts which are intimately con- 
nected with those of our own, and which will be found in the 
pages of this volume, but not in so full and perfect a manner 
as we could have wished, yet sufficiently full to give the reader 
an intelligent idea of what was done. And in this regaixl we 
would refer in an especial manner to the services rendered and 
the work performed by the women of Massachusetts in behalf 
of the soldiers. The women of the Revolution did much, aud 
doubtless had the will to have done more ; but they did not 
possess the means, either pecuniary or practical, which the 
women of our day possessed. In their day the railroad and 
the telegraph were unknown ; yet to these agencies we are 
indebted, not only for the rapid transportation of our soldiers 
and the early transmission of important information during the 
late war, but in a primary degree for the Christian and Sani- 
tary Commissions, and the local auxiliary associations which 
were organized in almost every city and town in Massachusetts, 
and, we may add, by nearly every religious society in the 
Commonwealth. These auxiliary societies, adopting in most 
instances the appropriate name of "Soldiers* Aid Societies," 
were composed entirely of patriotic and Christian women ; and 
their purpose was to furnish medicines, delicacies, underclothing, 
books, newspapers, and other useful material for the bodily and 
spiritual comfort of the sick and wounded in the hospitals, and 
for the healthy and able-bodied on the battle-field and in the 
camp. The value and extent of these contributions can never 



4 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

properly be estimated in dollars and cents, nor can the good 
which they were the means of accomplishing ever be accurately 
known on earth. These works are as treasures laid up in 
heaven. 

Without the means of transportation afforded by the rail- 
roads, and the transmission of important information by the 
telegraph, these invaluable organisms would probably never 
have existed. We are not aware that any of a similar char- 
acter were formed during the war of the Revolution ; and, if any 
were formed, they would have been almost entirely inoperative, 
on account of the want of ready transportation, and the impossi- 
bility of receiving timely information of the casualties resulting 
from a great battle. They were, however, valuable auxiliaries 
to the good cause all through the late Rebellion. A battle was 
no sooner fought than it was known through the land ; and as 
soon as known, and ere the smoke of the conflict had disap- 
peared, and the wounded been taken to the hospitals, materials 
of every useful description, with volunteer surgeons and nurses, 
were in rapid transmission to the places where they were most 
needed. 

We have taken much pains, during the last four years, to 
gamer up all the information possible to be obtained respecting 
these local organizations, scattered throughout our ancient Com- 
monwealth, from Barnstable to Berkshire ; and, although we 
have been successful to a reasonable extent, we have not accom- 
plished all that we have desired. We have, however, probably 
gathered in the bulk of the crop, so* widespread and so nour- 
ishing; but there is left standing in the field unseen, alone, 
something for the gleaner yet to do. And we apprehend that, 
however much may have been gathered, and may hereafter 
be, much that was done will never be fully known ; for in 
many instances no written records were kept, and in others 
those that were kept have perished from the earth. The labor 
performed was so much one of love and duty, that it is remem- 
bered only as a satisfaction by those by whom it was performed ; 
a thing which brought its own rewartl, in thus having contrib- 
uted, — however much or however little, yet something, — in 
these long years of war and suffering, towards rendering the 



INTRODUCTORT AND EXPLANATORY. 5 

soldier's sick-bed less hard, and the pains of his wounded limb 
less poignant. 

It is not necessary for us to speak, in this place, more in 
detail of what was done by the women of Massachusetts in for- 
warding contributions to the New-England Sanitary Commis- 
sion, or to the institution for soldiers' relief which, during the 
whole of the war, was watched over and superintended by that 
distinguished and accomplished lady, Mrs. Harrison Gray 
Otis, to whom we have the honor to dedicate this book, as we 
have spoken of them as they deserve In the first volume of this 
work. A few facts, however, concerning the Massachusetts 
Christian Commission would not be out of place, as no especial 
reference was made to it in our previous publication. It was 
througii tiiis and the Sanitary Commission that a large part of 
the contributions made by the women of the Commonwealth 
found their way to the army and to the hospitals, and were 
properly distributed ; but the Christian Commission received 
large benefactions likewise from men, as well as from the 
women, as the following brief abstract of its doings will 
abundantly prove. 

The work of the Christian Commission in ^lassachusetts was 
under the charge of Charles Demond, Esq., of Boston. He 
devoted a large portion of his time during the war to this work, 
in the performance of which he visited many of our towns, 
addressed assemblages of the people, and organized local soci- 
eties. In the Young Men's Christian Association of Boston 
he found a vigorous and useful ally. The receiving-ship at the 
Charlestown Navy Yard, where upwards of twenty-six thousand 
enlisted sailors were received during the war, was regularly 
visited by members of the Association, and articles of comfort 
and reading matter were distributed. They also held religious 
meetings every night on board the ship. The camps at Read- 
ville and at Gallop's Island were visited for similar purposes. 

The amount of money received by the Treasurer of the 
Commission at Boston was $330,197.86; and at Springfield, 
$33,553.17. In addition to these amounts, more than $15,000 
were sent direct from Massachusetts to the office of the Com- 
mission at Philadelphia, — thus making the total amount of 



MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 



or 

o 



money contributed by Massachusetts to the Commission, durin 
the war, $378,751.03 ; besides which, the value of sanitary and 
other stores contributed by the people of the State to the Com- 
mission amounted to $500,240.00, — making a total of eight 
hundred and seventy-eight thousand nine hundred and ninety- 
one dollars and three cents ($878,1)91.03). Tliese large sums 
were not received from fairs and other similar appliances, but 
were free-will offerings made by the people of the Common- 
wealth in response to appeals through the newspapers and by 
public addresses from members and friends of the cause. 

On three several occasions, — after the battle of Gettysburg 
in July, 1863, after the battle of tlie Wilderness in May, 1864, 
and after the fall of Richmond in April, 1865, — Mr. Demond, 
Mr. Edward S. Tobey, and some other members of the Army 
Committee of the Christian Commission, sat in the Merchants* 
Exchange, in Boston, and received the voluntary offerings of 
the people. No one was asked to give ; every cent received 
was a free gift. And tlie result was as follows : on the first 
occasion, thirty-five thousand dollars ; on the second, sixty 
thousand dollars ; and on the third, thirty thousand dollars, — 
making an aggregate of one hundred and twenty-five thousand 
dollars. This large amount was made up of comparatively small 
sums. Only one was as large as a thousand dollars ; tlie others 
varied from that down to ten cents. 

One day, while receiving contributions, immediately after the 
battle of Gettysburg, information was received of the fall of 
Vicksburg. The despatch containing the information was writ- 
ten on the blackboard, and was in these words : — 

Vicksburg has surrendered. 

U. S. Grant. 

Instantly shouts of joy went up from the assembled merchants. 
When the immediate excitement had subsided, they joined with 
uncovered heads in singing, — 



li 



Praise God, from whom all blessings flow." 



At the conclusion of the hymn, some one remarked, "Let us 
show our gratitude by our gifts." The persons present imme- 



INTRODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 7 

diately crowded around the table of the committee ; and oifers 
of money were made faster than it could be received. Remarks 
like these were frequently made : ** This is my thank-offering." 
— " We must take care of the boys who fight for us." — ** If you 
want any more, call on me." Contributions soon began to come 
in to the committee by mail from different parts of the Com- 
monwealth, and continued coming until one hundred and sixty- 
five thousand dollars were received. The employ (is in the 
Charlestown Navy Yard sent in a coUection amounting to 
$6,432.26 ; and it is related that "an old lady of eighty years, 
who lived in Amherst, and supported herself by sewing, walked 
four miles to carry to her pastor five cents, that he might send 
it to aid the suffering soldiers." Several instances are men- 
tioned in these pages of aged women who spent the working 
hours of each day in knitting socks and mittens for the soldiers, 
and of young girls who gave their leisure time to scraping lint 
and making bandages for use in the hospitals. Many of the 
unfortunate inmates of our lunatic asylums made up under- 
clothing, and otherwise labored in behalf of the Union soldiers ; 
and several cases are related, in the first volume of this work, 
of schoolboys who spent their vacations in picking berries in the 
woods and pastures, which they sold, and forwarded the entire 
proceeds to the Christian and Sanitary Commissions. In view 
of these and many other facts which are related in these pages, 
it may well be said that when the rich and the poor, the aged 
and the middle-aged, the youth and children of both sexes, the 
sound in mind and those whom God hath suffered to be afflicted, 
unite as one in the support of a great cause, it cannot be other- 
wise than just, and cannot fail in the end to be successful. 

The chief purpose of this volume, however, is to show what 
was done by each of the cities and towns in this Commonwealth, 
in their corporate capacities, to recruit and sustain our armies in 
the field, and to provide for the comfortable maintenance of the 
families of the soldiers and sailors when absent, and, when dis- 
abled, after their return home. To do this correctly, and to 
make each record complete, we believed it proper, as it was most 
certainly just, that the names of the gentlemen who were 
Mayors, Aldermen, Clerks, and Treasurers of our cities, and 



8 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

of Selectmen, Clerks, and Treasurers of our towns, (luring the 
years of the war, should have due prominence in a work like this ; 
for upon them in a great degree rested the heavy responsibilities 
under which each municipality was placed during the whole 
war, in filling its contingents of men, and appropriating money 
for bounties and other military purposes. This will make the 
record of the officers employed in the civil service of the State 
correspond in a degree with the rolls of the various regiments 
and companies, which give the names of the officers and men 
employed in the military service of the nation, and which are 
preserved at the State House and the War Department. 

The best and only way by which to show what was done by 
the cities and towns, and to make manifest the patriotic spirit of 
the people, was by obtaining a transcript of the votes and reso- 
lutions passed by each, which had a bearing upon the Rebellion 
and its origin, and the means best calculated to suppress it and 
preserve the Union. To obtain this information, we have 
labored long, but nevertheless with complete success ; for which 
our warmest thanks are due to the city and town officers, and to 
others who have felt an interest in the object we sought to attain. 
We have succeeded in obtaining returns, and in nearly every 
instance very full returns, of the votes and resolutions which 
were passed in each place ; also the names of the city and town 
officers of each during the period of the war. The labor re- 
quired to gather in this vast amouht of war record ; of arrang- 
ing, with a view to publication, these manuscripts ; and of 
compressing into a limited space an intelligent narrative of 
what was done by each of the three hundred and forty separate 
municipalities during the four years of the war, — has been very 
great, and we hope it has been done with judgment and accu- 
racy. From the beginning to the end of the work, the great 
difficulty we had to encounter, and, if possible, to overcome, was, 
how properly to accomplish the purpose we had in view, — to 
embody every matter of interest or importance, showing the 
spirit and purpose of our people, within our limited space. To 
do this we were forced of necessity to abstract and condense 
much which we otherwise would have gladly given in full. 
Nevertheless, we believe we have not only preserved the spirit. 



INTRODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 9 

but also the substance, of all that was done. Throughout these 
entire records, the Union sentiment of the Commonwealth is 
made to appear in its entirety, and with reinvigorating strength. 
Nowhere does there seem to have been an opposite spirit or a 
different sentiment expressed or entertained ; not even in the 
darkest hours, when the Union cause looked the least hopeful. 
We may therefore affirm, with the strictest truth, that if ever 
there were a people of one mind in a cause, for the support of 
which they were ready to pledge life, liberty, and property, the 
people of Massachusetts were, during the whole of the Rebellion. 
We have read with care, and for a purpose, every vote and 
every resolve acted upon or passed at every town meeting held 
during the war in Massachusetts ; and on no occasion and no- 
where does there appear to have been aught but entire unanim- 
ity on the part of the people to support with all their power the 
Government in its determination to put down the Rebellion and 
maintain the Union. This may not be a remarkable, but it is 
certainly a gratifying, fact. It is honorable to our people, and 
adds a new glory to the historic renown of the Commonwealth. 

The outbreak of war, and the sudden call for troops to defend 
the national capitol, although not unexpected by Governor 
Andrew and his mih'tary stiff, were nevertheless a very great 
surprise to the people of the Commonwealth, especially to those 
living in districts remote from Boston. For nearly fifty years 
they had lived in peace, and knew practically nothing of the 
waste of life and of treasure which a great war entails upon a 
community engaged in it. In more than nine-tenths of the 
towns no military organizations had existed for at least thirty 
years ; and, at the time of the first call for troops, the whole 
available military force of the Commonwealth was less than six 
thousand men, and those were chiefly in the large cities and 
towns on the seaboard counties. The volunteer, organized 
militia, in the great central county of Worcester, and the four 
western counties of Hampden, Hampshire, Franklin, and Berk- 
shire, did not exceed one thousand men ; and in the counties of 
Barnstable, Nantucket, and Dukes, there was not a solitary 
company or a military organization of any description. 

At the commencement of the war, no one, however wise, was 



10 MA.**ACHr*ETT5 LS THE KEBEIXIOX. 



al^le duration, mu'?L k:»§ :t» exten: 23«i mazniruiie. A senend 
imj>r^*ion prevaiie^I that it wou>J ii*..c exUrZkJ bey..pZMl tbe vear 
in which it fy^mm^rnc^d. The ;i:zii--^t licit a«fi^nied to it bv 
Serr^rtarv .Ssrwanl was ninetv dav« ; and the Secretary of War. 
Mr. Cameron, wa^ eqaallv at fault in his calculatiijn. On tbe 
I'Vth of May, only one month from the time the first call was 
ma/le by the President for troops, that gentleman p<»itivelv 
refuj«f:fl, in a letter addressed to Goremor Andrew, to accept 
from Ma«ftachij«ett£ more than ^ix regiments of three-years yoI- 
unUsf^m, although ten were already organized, and anxious for 
orders U} march. In this remarkable letter, ^Ir. Cameron says : 
^ It is im[Kirtant to reduce rather than to enlarge this number 
Chix regimentft), ajid in no tvtnt to exceed it. Let me earnestly 
rcc/immend to you therefore to call for no more than eight regi- 
ments, * of which six only are to serve for three years, or during 
the war, and if more are already called for to reduce the num^ 
her by dinchurge.^ It was not until the 17th of June succeed- 
ing, that Governor Andrew, with all his knowledge and ability, 
could prevail upon the Secretary to accept the four additional 
rcgirncntH which had been organized, and were in camp, expect- 
ing their Hcrviccs would i>e accepted. We mention these facts to 
hIiow how gentlemen in the highest official positions, and pos- 
KCHKing the l>est means of information upon which to form an 
uccurute judgment, were mistaken in their estimate of the crisis 
precijiituted upon the country in April, 1861, and the duration 
of its exifltence. It was not until after the first battle of Bull 
Run in «luly, that the Washington authorities began fully to 
cotnpnihend the real magnitude of affairs, and to adopt measures 
in corrcHpondencc with them. 

Wc believe that these pages will show that in "the little 
conn<*ilM of the interior towns " there was a more comprehensive 
view of the situation entertained and expressed, from the very 
beginning of hostilities, than in the higher walks of general 
utatCHmanshii). Many of the votes passed, and resolutions 



* Two tlmH*-ini>nthH rvt;inu*nt8 had previously been called for, and were 
illvludod ill tho eiKht n^ferred to. 



INTRODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 11 

adopted by the towns, are indeed quite remarkable in these 
respects, but not more so than the good sense and ardent patriot- 
ism which marked their course in support of the Government. 

In most of the towns, town-meetings were held as soon as 
legal notice could be given, to take measures to organize new 
military companies, and to provide the members with proper 
uniforms and outfits, and, in the event of their being called into 
active service, to make suitable provision for the comfortable 
maintenance of their families. In many places, votes were 
passed to pay the men a per diem for every day or half-day 
spent in drilling, previous to being mustered into active military 
service, and to make considerable additions to the monthly pay 
allowed by Government. For these and similar purposes liberal 
appropriations were made, and, when necessary, the selectmen 
or town treasurers were authorized to borrow whatever sums of 
money there might be required to carry the votes into practical 
effect. In some cases, committees were appointed to assist the 
selectmen in recruitinc; volunteers and in distributing: assistance 
to the soldiers' families ; but in every town the weight of the 
duties was made to rest on the shoulders of the regular town 
officers, who, at stated periods, reported their doings to the 
citizens in " town- meeting assembled," and were by them ap- 
proved. And although these officers received and paid for war 
purposes and for State aid, during the war, upwards of twenty- 
two millions of dollars, we do not find, in an examination of 
the records of every town, that in a single instance was there a 
dollar misapplied, or a suspicion ever entertained that any 
portion of the vast sums appropriated had been withheld or 
cxpende<l in a corrupt or improper manner by any of the town 
or city officers. 

The reader will be impressed, in looking over the proceed- 
ings of these town-meetings, with the good sense and decorum 
which everywhere appears in them ; of the care taken to do 
nothing that was not legal, nothing that the town had not a 
lawful right to do; and in several instances, where doubts 
were entertained or expressed concerning some particular vote 
or appropriation, the selectmen, before proceeding to execute it, 
were directed to consult counsel, whether the vote was legal and 




12 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

constitutional ; at other times, when a matter was desirable, but 
of questionable legality, the selectmen were directed "to petition 
the General Court for the passage of an act which would meet 
the case." Indeed, the greater part of the acts passed by the 
Legislature in relation to the war, such as those for the payment 
of bounties, and of State aid, were but the embodiment in a 
legal form of ideas and suggestions expressed at these primary 
meetings ; and this leads us to make a statement of the pro- 
visions of a few of those acts which were passed, having relation 
to the cities and towns, with a view to regulate and make equal 
the payment of aid to soldiers' families, and as far as possible 
the payment of bounties to volunteers. 

The extra session of the Legislature, which met on the 14th 
of May, 1861, passed " an act in aid of the families of volun- 
teers and for other purposes," which provided that towns and 
cities might raise money by taxation, to provide assistance for 
the families of volunteers and those dependent upon them for 
support, but restricted the amount to twelve dollars a month to 
any one family ; * and the money so applied was to be reimbursed 
annually to each city and town from the treasury of the Com- 
monwealth, from which fact it was called " State Aid." One 
purpose of this act was to prevent towns from too much extrava- 
gance in providing for the dependants of the soldiers, which 
some of them at the commencement of the war were inclined to do. 

• 

Another purpose was to incite to action towns which might not, 
otherwise, make suitable provision for these dependants, know- 
ing that, if they did, the money expended would be reimbursed 
to them by the Commonwealth. This act, without material 
change, continued in force all through the Rebellion, and in a 
modified form it still remains upon our statute-book. It was 
one of the wisest State measures of the war. The amount of 
money paid by each city and town for State aid during each of 
the four years of the war, and afterwards refunded by the 
Commonwealth, will be found in these pages as part of the 
record of each city and town, the aggregate amount of which 
during the four years was $8,348,880.63. 

* See Volume I., page 186. 



INTRODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 13 

Many of the towns, however, did not pay strict regard to the 
law, but expended in many cases a much larger amount than the 
State would reimburse. Vast sums were also contributed by 
private benevolence for the comfortable support of the wives and 
children of the absent volunteers, and to the widows and the 
fatherless of those who fell in battle, or died of disease, of which 
no account can be given, as in a majority of cases no record was 
ever kept of it. By the same act, any city or town was author- 
ized to raise money by taxation to defray any expense already 
incurred, or to carry out any contract heretofore made with any 
of its inhabitants who might have enlisted in the volunteer ser- 
vice, but all other contracts of a like nature were to terminate 
in ninety days. The purpose of this provision was to restrain 
towns, when under momentary excitement, from making rash 
and costly promises of monthly pay to volunteers, which, if 
continued, and the war was prolonged, were likely to impoverish 
the town to a degree bordering upon bankruptcy. Another 
object which it sought to prevent was a rivalry or competition 
between towns in obtaining volunteers by extravagant outlays of 
money, giving to a wealthy town an undue advantage over one 
comparatively poor. This evil was further remedied by the act 
passed at the extra session of the Legislature, entitled an act 
'* for the payment of bounties to volunteers and for other pur- 
poses," which was approved by the Governor November 18th, 
1863. This act provided that bounties to volunteers should be 
paid directly by the Commonwealth,* and fixed the amount at 
three hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, who 
should enlist for a term of three years, and be credited to the 
quota of any town or city in the Commonwealth. It also 
allowed volunteers the option of taking, in lieu of this aggregate 
amount, a bounty of fifty dollars when mustered into the military 
service, and twenty dollars a month until discharged, and in the 
event of his death while in the service one hundred and twenty 
dollars to his widow or legal heirs. It was believed that the 
liberal amount of bounty provided in this act would, by making 
it uniform throughout the Commonwealth, secure all the men 

* See Volume I., pages 503, 604. 



14 IfASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

that might be required by the Government, and prevent the 
evils of competition between towns in filling their quotas, the 
practical effect of which was to swell to an unnecessary degree 
the amount of the local bounties. It failed, however, to accom- 
plish this desirable purpose ; for towns, in their anxiety to furnish 
the number of men required of them, continued to pay bounties 
of their own, notwithstanding the large bounty offered by the 
State. This practice led to the passage of another act, by which 
cities and towns were prohibited from paying a larger bounty 
than one hundred and twenty-five dollars to a volunteer for three 
years' service, which will explain to the reader the similarity of 
the votes passed by the towns in 1864, restricting the payment 
of bounty beyond that sum ; it will also explain why some of 
them voted that the bounty thus provided should be paid tu 
gold, which, though not a violation of the letter of the statute, 
certainly did not accord with its spirit and intention. Nor was 
this all. The towns, though restricted from paying a larger 
bounty than one hundred and twenty-five dollars, did not prevent 
citizens in their personal and private capacity from contributing 
of their own means to raise large sums for the encouragement of 
recruiting, by adding to the amount allowed by law to be raised 
by taxation, and paid by the towns. Tiie only objection to this 
practice was, that it gave undue advantage to the wealthy 
towns over their less fortunate neighbors ; which we presume 
will be regarded as a legitimate advantage, and one which wealth 
always has over poverty. 

A word of explanation is proper here to account for the 
apparent discrepancy, which appears in the votes passed by many 
of the towns in the year 1862, in the amount of bounties paid 
to volunteers for three years' service, and those for nine months' 
service. In most of the towns the amounts were the same for 
both ; in several of them a larger bounty was paid to the nine- 
months men than was paid to those for three years. The reason 
was this : On the 4th of July, 1862, the President issued a call 
for three hundred thousand volunteers for three years' service, 
of which number Massachusetts was to furnish fifteen thousand. 
The towns immediately held meetings, appropriated money, 
and fixed the amount of the bounty which they authorized to be 



INTRODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 15 

paid. The amounts offered by each did not materially vary, 
although each fixed its own without consulting the others, and 
without their knowledge. The votes only show how nearly of 
one mind the towns were. Recruiting began with much ear- 
nestness, and in less than sixty days the whole number was 
obtained. While in the midst of recruiting the fifteen thousand 
three-years men, another order was issued by the President on 
the 4th of August, calling for three hundred thousand men for 
nine months' service, supplemented with the information that, if 
not furnished within a comparatively short time, a drafl would 
be resorted to. Of these men Massachusetts was to furnish 
nineteen thousand and eighty. Thus on two separate calls, 
issued within four weeks of each other, Massachusetts was asked 
to furnish without delay thirty-four thousand and eighty men. 
Before either of these calls was made, Massachusetts had fur- 
nished thirty-five thousand men for the military service, and 
twelve thousand for the navy, making an aggregate of forty- 
seven thousand men already in the service ; and what bore 'with 
peculiar hanlship upon Massachusetts and other maritime States 
was, that no account was taken of and no credit given for the men 
in the navy. So that we had to furnish our full proportion of 
men for the military service, and at the same time man the navy 
with seamen, for whom we obtained no credit or allowance 
whatever ; and this injustice continued until July 4th, 1864, when 
an act passed Congress allowing the men in the navy, who had 
enlisted since April, 1861, to be counted into the contingent of 
a State to which they belonged, and in which they had enlisted. 
By this act of tardy justice Massachusetts was credited with 
twenty-two thousand three hundred and sixty men (22,360).* 
It is not surprising therefore that, in order to enlist our propor- 
tion of nine-months men in August, 1862, the bounties could 
not be diminished in proportion to the shortness of the term of 
service required. About one in fifteen of the entire population 
of the Commonwealth were already in either the military or 
naval service of the country, and now we were to add upwards 
of nineteen thousand to the number. To this additional demand 

* See Volume I., pages 661-668. 



16 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

there was no opposition, except among a portion of the rabble 
in some of our large cities, who made the possibility of a draft 
the pretext for riotous demonstrations, which for a few hours 
only in the city of Boston assumed a serious aspect, when it 
was crushed and scattered by the firmness of Governor Andrew 
and the military and civil authorities of the cities and State. 
The only effect of these disturbing and disloyal elements, which 
were confined to the most brutal, ignorant, and dangerous 
classes, always to be found in large places, was to encourage 
enlistments, and add strength to the Union cause. Before the 
close of the year the number of men asked for by the President 
on each call had been enlisted, enrolled, assigned, and sent 
forward to the front. 

' Previous to the President's calls of July and August, 1862, 
no fixed district or town system for recruiting men for the mili- 
tary service had been formed by either the Commonwealth or by 
the General Government, and no system of local credits had 
been arranged, by which we could tell how many men had 
entered the service from any particular city or town. True, the 
names of the men in the service were upon the muster-rolls of 
each company and regiment, and copies of them were in the 
offices of the Adjutant-General of the State, and the Adjutant- 
General of the Army at Washington ; but these rolls did not 
clearly indicate to which town, city, or precinct a soldier be- 
longed. As the war progressed and increased in magnitude, it 
became important, especially when a drafl was impending, to 
ascertain accurately the number, and if possible the names, of 
the volunteers which each place had furnished ; as it was under- 
stood that if a draft should take place the men alre<idy furnished 
were to be taken into consideration, and allowances made. Ac- 
cordingly, soon after the receipt of the President's calls of July 
and August, a general order was issued by the Adjutant-Gen- 
eral of the Commonwealth, with the approval of Governor 
Andrew, requesting the Mayor of each city, and the Selectmen 
of each town, to make a sworn return within a specified time of 
the men belonging to the place who had entered the military ser- 
vice, giving, as far as in their power, the name of the person, 
and the company and regiment to which he belonged. In due 



INTRODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 17 

time these returns were received, properly made out, signed, and 
sworn to, and they were of incalculable value in forming the 
basis upon which all subsequent credits were given and all 
subsequent demands were made. These returns were accepted 
as correct by the United-States military authorities at Wash- 
ington, and here ; and they were correct as returns could be. 
The system pursued henceforth, both by the State and United 
States, until the end of the war, was in substance as follows : 
Take, for an instance, the call made by the President on 
July 4, 1862, for three hundred thousand men. The pro- 
portion which Massachusetts was required to furnish was 
fifteen thousand. This proportion was based upon the enrol- 
ment by the State of all able-bodied male citizens between 
the ages of eighteen and forty-five years. The gross number 
only which each State was to furnish was given by the United- 
States authorities. To the State, and to the United-States As- 
sistant Provost-Marshal stationed in Boston, was assigned the 
duty of deciding upon the number of men which each city or 
town should furnish to complete the total of fifteen thousand 
men, which was ascertained by the number of enrolled men 
in each. The number of men already furnished was duly 
credited and deducted. Some of the towns were not bound to 
furnish any men under that call, as they had already furnished 
their full proportion. Some even claimed to have furnished 
more than their share, and asked to be allowed credits for sur- 
pluses, on the call for nine-months volunteers. The surpluses, 
however, were not allowed to count on that call ; but they were 
considered and allowed on subsequent calls. So that, from this 
time until the end of the war, a system of debit and credit was 
kept up between the Government, the State, the towns, cities, 
and districts ; at the end a balance was struck, and it appeared, 
by the rolls in the Adjutant-General's office, and by the books of 
the United-States Assistant Provost-Marshal-General of Massa- 
chusetts (Major Clark, U.S.A.), that every city and town in the 
Commonwealth had filled its quota upon every call made by the 
President for troops ; and, with the exception of twelve small 
towns, each had furnished a surplus over and above all demands, 
the aggregate of which was fifteen thousand one hundred and 



■ s 

•3 



18 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

seventy-eight men (15,178). The whole number of men which 
Massachusetts furnished for the array and navy, and for which 
she was credited, was one hundred and fifty-nine thousand one 
hundred and sixty-five (159,165). 

We have not been able to obtain from the War Department, 
for use in the compilation of this volume, a copy of the returns 
made by Major Clark, U.S.A., of the number of men by cities 
and towns furnished by Massachusetts for the war, as it is con- 
trary to the rules of the Department to furnish copies of such 
papers. We have therefore been compelled to be content with 
the returns made by the city and town officers, in 1866, to a 
committee of the Massachusetts Legislature, of which the Hon. 
Tappan Wentworth, of Lowell, was chairman. Those returns 
are neither complete nor entirely accurate, although they ap- 
proximate to both : one thing is greatly in their favor, they do 
not exaggerate, nor claim more than they are entitled to ; on the 
contrary, they fall short of what is justly their due, a discrepancy 
which can easily be accounted for by the probable fact that they 
make no claim for men which were credited to the State at 
large, and a majority of the towns have not taken into account 
the surplus of men who served in the navy, and which were 
credited pro rata to them by the State. The probability is that 
the returns referred to onlv included the men who were bofia 
fide inhabitants of the towns to which they were credited. 
These facts fully explain the discrepancy of about ten thousand 
men between the number claimed by the towns and the number 
actually furnished by the State, and credited by the War Depart- 
ment. But be this as it may, the number of suiylus men which 
each city and town furnished in excess of all demands is correctly 
given, in its proper place in the record of each city and town, 
in these pages. These were copied from the records of Major 
Clark, U.S.A., Assistant Provost-Marshal-General of Massa- 
chusetts, at the end of the war, before they were forwarded by 
him to the War Department at Washington, and were published 
in the Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of Massachusetts 
for the year 1865.* 

* For a more full and detailed account of the men furnished hy Massachusetts, 
see Volume I., page GG7, and the reports of the Adjutant-General during the 
war. 



INTBODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 19 

By the very able report (House Doc. No. 7), made by Mr. 

Wentworth to the Legislature in 1867, and to which we have 

already referred, it is made to appear that the expenses incurred 

by the several cities and towns for bounties, recruiting, and 

other expenses growing out of the war, but not including the 

payment of State aid to the families of volun- 
teers, was $13,010,867.52 

Being $10.74 for each inhabitant of the State, 
according to the census of 1865. 

The expense incurred by the Commonwealth 

for the same 29,594,650.40 

Which added to the sum expended by the cities 

and towns, makes a total of $42,605,517.92 

Being $33.62 for each inhabitant. 

Eighty-two cities and towns, containing a popu- 
lation of 184,336, have returned private con- 
tributions to bounty and recruiting expenses 
amounting to 806,948.80 

Assuming that the cities and towns from which 
no such returns have been received have con- 
tributed in the same proportion to the same ob- 
ject, the total private contributions amount to 5,550,293.82 

The contributions from fairs and all private 
sources, for all purposes connected with the 
war, may be safely estimated at ... . 2,500,000.00 

The last three sums added to the amount paid 

by the State and towns will m<ike a total of $51,462,760.54 

Of the war expenses incurred by the towns, 
there has been paid (Jan. 1, 1866), by 
taxation 4,457,754.57 

Of the same expended by the State there has 
been paid 8,997,345.32 

Add private contributions to the recruiting ex- 
penses, &C., partly estimated 5,550,293.82; 

Add contributions from fairs and all private 
sources, for all purposes connected with the 
war, as estimated 2,500,000.00 

Making a total of $21,407,393.71 



20 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Of the war expenses the towns now owe 

(Jan. 1, 1866) $8,554,112.95 

Of the war expenses the State now (Jan. 1, 

1866) owes 16,379,484.32 

Total $25,933,597.27 

^ The amoant exhibited," says the Report, ^ undoubtedly falls below 
the actual expenditure. The Legislature of 1863, chapter 218, im- 
posed a tax upon the several cities and towns, with a view of partially 
equalizing the expenses of the bounties previously paid by them. By 
this act, many of the towns were made debtors to the larger number ; 
and they paid into the State treasury large sums to liquidate the debt 
thus created by statute. This transaction has, in many of the debtor 
towns, been disregarded in making their returns. Considerable sums 
have also been paid for interest, and additional expenses have been 
incurred by the increase of duty imposed upon town officers. 

'*The expenses of the State on account of the war, occasioned by 
an increase in the number of departments, and an augmentation of 
clerical force in the regular departments, together with the cost of 
extra legislation, would, if reckoned, add largely to the general amount 
above stated. Extra charges to the Adjutant- General's office and to 
the Paymaster's office, only, are included in the above statement. There 
will be large additions to the State expenses, on account of the aid 
granted by the State, under standing laws passed since the commence- 
ment of the war, to soldiers' families, the accounts of which (May 14, 
1866) are still open; and also on account of aid to disabled officers and 
soldiers, granted by a law passed at the present session.* 

^ The amount of expenditure already made and voted may be re- 
garded as evidence of the interest felt by the citizens of the Common- 
wealth in the contest through which we have successfully passed, and as 
a pledge of their devotion to civil liberty, and of their determination to 
maintain the Union of the States. 

"No better evidence of the determination of the people of the 
Commonwealth to support the General Government, in the war, can 
perhaps be found than the individual contributions given in aid of its 
prosecution, which, in many of the towns, were astonishingly large. 
In Bradford, Watertown, Gardner, Mendon, and Templeton, they 

* These accounts still remain open. State aid is still paid to disabled soldiers 
and their families, and will, we tnist, continue to be paid, while the men and 
their dependants require assistance. 



INTRODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 21 

exceeded five dollars to each inhabitant ; in Washington, six ; in 
Somerville, seven ; in West Cambridge (Arlington), eight; in Leyden, 
nine ; in Longmeadow, ten ; and in Belmont, ten/* * 

The Legislative Report, from which the above extracts are 
taken, gives the war expenses incurred by the Commonwealth 
up to January, 1866. Since then they have been increased 
nearly two millions and a half of dollars, chiefly by the contin- 
uance of the payment of State aid to soldiers and their families, 
and the payment of outstanding bounties ; so that the total 
amount of expenditure by the Commonwealth on account of the 
war to the 1st of January, 1871, was upwards of thirty- two 
millions of dollars, or, in exact figures, $32,039,545.20. In 
the mean time it has been decreased to $16,573,244.00, for the 
redemption and payment of which the following sinking funds 
are pledged : — 

Union Loan Sinking Fund .93,600,000.00 

Bounty Loan Sinking Fand 2,899,980.85 

War Loan Sinking Fand 1,885,803.66 

Coast Defence Loan Sinking Fund 425,690.79 

Total ^8,261,474.80 



The extinguishment of the war debt of Massachusetts is there- 
fore in a fair way of being accomplished in a very few years ; 
and judging from the rapid decrease of the war debt of the 
cities and towns by taxation during the two years immediately 
succeeding the war, and the establishment by the largest places 
of sinking funds, very many of them have already (June, 
1871) paid off all the indebtedness which they incurred on 
account of the war. 

We are not aware that the amount paid for bounties in 
Massachusetts is larger, or even so large, as was paid in the 
other New-England States, or in the Middle and Western States ; 
but this we know, that, while the volunteer system was the rule 

* The attention of the Committee was not drawn to tlie work done by the 
women of the State ; and therefore the contributions made by them in money, 
dothingy books, and hospital stores, are not mentioned or even referred to in the 
Report. 



/ 



22 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

of the Government, bounties were not only a necessity, but it was 
just that they should be paid. Massachusetts and the other New- 
England States did not have so large a proportion of young 
men between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years, com- 
pared with the whole population, as the Middle and particu- 
larly the Western States had. Massachusetts for the last 
twenty years has been a State to emigrate from, and not to 
emigrate to. The Western States have received a generous 
proportion, every year, of our active, ambitious, and enterprising 
young men, and will continue to receive for generations to come. 
While the regiments and batteries which went to the war had 
a fair percentage of men of foreign birth in their ranks and 
among their officers, they had no representation whatever 
from the Middle or Western States ; but those States were well 
represented in every regiment and updh every battle-field by 
men of Massachusetts birth or origin, and were also repre- 
sented in a greater degree by men of foreign birth than were 
Massachusetts and the other New-England States. This was 
all fair enough and proper enough, and could not have been 
otherwise. Again, Massachusetts had, in proportion to its pop- 
ulation, a larger percentage of women and other non-combatants 
than any other State in the Union. By the census of 1865 the 
females exceed in numbers the male population nearly fifty 
thousand, while in the Western States the male population 
exceeds that of the female. We had also a much larger propor- 
tion of old people than the newer States outside of New Eng- 
land. New England, and especially Massachusetts, had, more- 
over, a large number of her young and active men at sea, and 
engaged in the fisheries, who were exempt from military service 
and from draft ; yet they were sdl counted in the population, and 
made to swell the basis upon which the contingents of States 
were made. Over twenty-six thousand of this class during the 
war were in the United-States Navy, for which the Common- 
wealth until near the close of the war (July 4, 1864) derived 
no advantage whatever. In the calls made by the President 
these men were not taken into account. We had to furnish our 
military contingent as though a navy did not exist. The West- 
em and interior States furnished few or no men for the navy. 



INTRODUCTOBY AND EXPLANATORY. 23 

Their young men went naturally into the military service, and 
every one counted to their military quotas. Not so in Massa- 
chusetts and other New-England States, where a large number 
entered the navy. 

The course pursued by the Government in refusing to allow 
credits for men in the navy bore with great hardship upon this 
Commonwealth^ and especially upon the counties and towns 
bordering upon the sea, the leading interests of which were 
maritime. A large proportion of their young men were already 
actively in the service of the United States, on board war vessels 
guarding the Southern coasts from blockade runners, or on far- 
ofF seas in search of piratical *' Alabamas ; " and yet they were 
made to furnish their full share of men for the military service, and 
this they did under every call of the President without complaint 
or murmur. In this connection we would call especial attention 
to the proceedings of the town-meetings held in Barnstable 
County and in other places whose interests were almost wholly 
maritime. In no portion of the Commonwealth or of the loyal 
States was there less fault-finding, or a more ready and deter- 
mined purpose evinced to sustain the Government and the Union 
to the last hazard. Knowing, as we do, intimately and thor- 
oughly the difficulties under which these towns labored to fulfil 
the requirements of the Government, and the generosity and 
will with which they did it, we cannot refrain from expressing in 
an especial degree our acknowledgments of the great service 
they did the cause, and the lasting and especial honor which 
their patriotism under the most trying circumstances cast upon 
the Commonwealth. 

In considering the matter of bounties, we should also take 
into account the fact that a very large portion of the men of 
Massachusetts, between ** the war ages," were mechanics at work 
in our various manufactories, which are scattered all over the 
Commonwealth. At the commencement of the Rebellion, me- 
chanical and all other branches of labor were stagnant, and few 
were remunerative. As the war progressed, they became busy 
and profitable. Labor was in great demand ; and wages rose 
to an unprecedented height, owing to the demand occasioned 
by the war, and the inflation of the currency. But, with these, 




24 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

articles of daily family use also increased in price in nearly a 
corresponding degree ; and between the demand for labor and 
the demand for volunteers there was a direct and active compe- 
tition. Skilled workmen, by remaining at home, could earn, 
on an average, from four to five dollars a day. Unskilled labor 
also received large wages. The pay of an enlisted man in the 
army was at the most sixteen dollars a month, exclusive of 
clothing money and rations. The demands of patriotism were 
urgent ; so were the demands of their families for support. As 
a means of equalizing these demands, bounties were paid to 
the volunteers, and State aid to their families. Both were just ; 
and they procured the men required, without resorting, except 
with a very few and unimportant exceptions, to a draft. Of the 
159,165 men which Massachusetts furnished for the war, less 
than twelve hundred were drafted men. 

The duties which the war imposed upon the city and town 
officers were incessant and arduous. To them, in a primary 
degree, belongs the honor of having recruited the different con- 
tingents of men called for by the President from Massachusetts ; 
and, in thus discharging their obligations, they did incalculable 
service to the Commonwealth and to the cause. It is proper, 
therefore, that their names should appear, with well-considered 
prominence, in a history of Massachusetts in the civil war, that 
they may go down to posterity as gentlemen who acted a diffi- 
cult and honorable part in preserving the life of the nation when 
assailed by bitter and defiant enemies. In all they did, they 
acted in harmony with Governor Andrew and the State author- 
ities, and were nobly sustained by their several constituencies in 
the liberal supply of means by which to accomplish their patri- 
otic purposes. Whatever of money or material aid they required 
was freely given. Money was voted almost without limit, both 
for the payment of bounties, and the comfortable support of the 
families of enlisted men, which were well cared for during the 
whole war, not only by the towns in their corporate capacities, 
but by voluntary contributions liberally made by the citizens. 
There may have been, and doubtless were, many cases of suffer- 
ing and hardship among the soldiers' families : when was it 
otherwise in a State engaged in a great war? All we mean to 



INTRODUCTORY AND EXPLANATORY. 25 

claim 18, that much was done to alleviate and ward off suffering, 
and to smooth down the rough and jagged road along which, 
for four long years, our people struggled, bearing many and 
grievous burdens. Of course we are aware that in the house- 
holds over which the Angel of Death cast its dark shadow, 
there were griefs which no kind hand or sympathetic word 
could wholly assuage, or console; but what could be done 
to lighten the weight of sorrow by which so many hearts were 
bowed down, and so many firesides left desolate, by the exercise 
of friendly aid and kind, sympathetic words, was done. But 
there are sorrows known to every heart which only He who 
made it can fully relieve. 

With these preliminary words, we present to the reader the 
doings of the ^* small assemblies of the towns,'' as they appear 
from an examination of their records. 




CHAPTER II. 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 



The county of Barnstable includes the whole of Cape Cod 
which, extending east and north into the Atlantic Ocean, was 
discovered by Gosnold in 1602. It is bounded north-west by 
Plymouth County, and west by Buzzard's Bay. Cape Cod lies 
in the form of an arm, half open : the elbow is at Chatham, 
twenty miles east of the town of Barnstable, which is the 
county seat. The whole length of the Cape is sixty-five 
miles, and the average breadth about five miles. Below the 
town of Barnstable the soil is composed mostly of sand ; and 
the people in considerable degree depend upon Boston, and 
other large places, for their meats and breadstuffs. It pos- 
sesses, however, unrivalled privileges for the cod, mackerel, 
and other fisheries. The county has comparatively little wood, 
but has many valuable peat meadows, in which, of late years, 
the cranberry has been successfully cultivated. The county is 
supplied with an abundance of pure soft water. Formerly 
large quantities of salt were manufactured on the Cape, which 
was used in the curing of fish. Of late years this branch of 
industry has diminished; so that in 1865 the value of salt 
manufactured in the county was only $52,719.00, while the 
aggregate value of other articles produced during the same 
year was six million ninety thousand and twenty-two dollars 
($6,090,022), of which nearly two millions and a quarter were 
derived from the cod and mackerel fishieries, — with which and 
the coasting-trade almost every family is more or less identified 
and interested. Barnstable County is noted for its good sailors 
and men of superior nautical talents, while its women are equally 
celebrated " for their fair complexions and good housewifery.** 



BARNSTABLE. 27 

Its people are the most homogeneous in the State, never having 
received a large infusion of new blood. It is not a desirable 
place for foreign settlement. The county, therefore, retains its 
old names, and its people their good old ways ; yet in no por- 
tion of the State will one find a more intelligent and well-bred 
people, in no community is there a more equal distribution of 
wealth, or a more genuine feeling of generous but unobtrusive 
hospitality. 

There are but thirteen towns in Barnstable County, one of 
the largest and most important of which, at the present time, is 
Provincetown, at the extreme end of the Cape, whose capacious 
harbor is one of the best on the Atlantic coast. In 1860 the 
population of the county was 35,990, in 1865 it was 34,489, 
being a decrease in five years of 1,501. The valuation of the 
county in 1860 was $12,621,291.00, in 1865 it was $14,276,- 
198.00, showing an increase in five years of $1,654,907.00. 

The number of men which Barnstable County furnished for 
the war was reported by the selectmen of the towns, in 1866, to 
have been 2,305. This return must have been altogether incor-- 
rect : the number could not have been less than thirty-six or 
thirty- seven hundred, the percentage of men furnished through- 
out the Commonwealth being about 9i to every 100 inhabitants ; 
and that Barnstable County was not behind any other portion of 
the State is conclusively shown by the fact, well ascertained and 
indisputable, that each of its towns filled its contingent of men 
upon every call of the President, and at the end of the war 
each was credited with having furnished a surplus over and 
above every demand, which in the aggregate amounted to three 
hundred and nine men. The total expenses of the towns on 
account of the war was $308,985.08. This is exclusive of 
$90,934.84, which was raised and paid for State aid to soldiers' 
families during the four years of the war, and which was reim- 
bursed by the State. Total, $399,919.92. 

The following is the record of each town in the county : — 

Barnstable. — Incorporated Sept. 3, 1639. Population in 
1860,5,129; in 1865, 4,913. Valuation in 1860, $2,041,- 
534; in 1865, $2,265,407. 



# 



28 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were 
Charles C. Bearse, Ebenezer Bacon, and Joseph R. Hull. 

The town-clerk and town -treasurer during the same period 
was Frederick G. Kelley. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 4th of May, at which 
it was — 

Voted, To pay each volunteer belonging to Barnstable, " who has 
enlisted, or may enlist, in the service of the United States, whether 
upon the land or upon the sea," the sum of forty dollars to aid them 
"in fitting for the service." 

Voted, To support the families of those who enlist and are citizens 
of Barnstable "during the whole time the head of the family is 
actually employed in the service." 

Voted, To appropriate one thousand dollars, " to be placed at the 
disposal of the Governor of the State for the assistance of the troops 
of the State," and that the selectmen notify the Governor ** at once " 
that the money is subject to his order. 

1862. On the 21st of July, it was voted to pay a bounty 
of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist in the 
military service for the term of three years, when mustered in 
and credited to the quota of the town, and one hundred dol- 
lars when he shall be honorably discharged, ** or to his lawful 
heirs," whether they belong "to the town of Barnstable or 
not." It was also voted to pay ten dollars extra "to each of 
the first twenty-four persons who may volunteer from Barn- 
stable." The selectmen were authorized to borrow whatever 
sums of money might be necessary for the payment of these 
bounties ; also five thousand dollars for State aid to the families 
of volunteers, as provided by act of the Legislature, sec. 1, 
chapter 66, of the acts of 1862. August 16th, It was voted 
"to pay each volunteer for three years' military service one 
hundred dollars, when mustered in and credited to the quota of 
Barnstable, and fifty dollars to him, or his legal representatives, 
at the expiration of the term for which he enlisted." 

The following resolutions were read, and unanimously 
adopted : — 



BARNSTABLE. 29 

HesoivecLf That the citizens of Barnstable fully appreciate the heroic 
patriotism and noble principle of those of her sons who have enlisted 
to make up the quota asked for by the President in his call for three 
hundred thousand volunteers, to put down the present wicked rebellion 
against the Grovemmment and Constitution of our country. 

Hesolved^ That we assure those who thus go forth in our behalf 
that we shall watch with fidelity their every footstep, as true soldiers 
in the campaign before them ; that we have the utmost confidence that 
their valor will do honor to the town they represent, and the memory 
of those patriot fathers of '76, who went forth from the homes of 
Barnstable to battle for the independence and nationality of this glo- 
rious government 

Resolved, That we pledge our honor as men and citizens to take 
honorable and tender care of the families of our volunteers whilst 
they battle for our rights, our liberties, our property, and our 
honor. 

Resolvedy That the citizens of this town pledge their ready and 
most active and vigorous assistance, according to the full measure of 
our ability, now and hereafter, to the President and Government of the 
United States, to put down and extinguish for ever this treasonable 
and most atrocious rebellion against the best government on the face 
of the earth. 

August 28th, The town voted to pay the same bounty, and on 
the same terms, to volunteers who would enlist for nine months' 
service and be credited to the quota of Barnstable, that was 
offered to volunteers for three years' service by vote of the town 
passed on the 16th. It also voted ^that all taxes that may be 
assessed upon the nine-months volunteers for the year 1863 be 
remitted to them, and that their families be assisted by this 
town the same as the families of the three-years volunteers are 
assisted." * September 6th, It was resolved, " That we have 
the utmost confidence in the President of the United States, 
and that we will give him our cordial support in signing the 
Emancipation and Confiscation Act at as early a day as he may 
deem expedient." 

* The town record says, " This meeting was the largest, and decidedly the 
most enthusiastic, of any one that has been held. It was enlivened by the sing- 
ing of several patriotic pieces. Full one-third of the audience were ladies, who 
have manifested a considerable interest in this movement from the start." 



30 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1864. June 30thy The town voted that all citizens who had 
enlisted, or might afterwards enlist, ^ who had received a bounty 
of one hundred and fifty dollars, be paid that amount," and to 
the heirs of those who have died in the service. July 27th, 
Voted to pay " each man in town who has, or who shall, put 
in a substitute in anticipation of a draft, the sum of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars." 

1865. At the annual town-meeting held March 6th, it was 
voted to authorize the selectmen to pay to each volunteer citizen 
who has no family or dependant, and therefore not entitled 
to State aid, the sum of two dollars a week while in the 
^service. 

1866. March 5th, An appropriation of one thousand dol- 
lai's was made for the erection of a soldiers' monument, to which 
was added $260.80, being the balance of the soldiers' fund in 
the hands of the selectmen. Walter Chipman, Joseph R. Hall, 
F. G. Kelley, Henry Goodspeed, Nathaniel Hinckley, Charles 
C. Bearse, and Freeman H. Jenkins were appointed to locate 
the monument and arrange for its erection. The monument 
was erected in that part of Barnstable called Centreville, and 
was appropriately dedicated July 4, 1866. 

Barnstable, according to a return made in 1866 by the 
selectmen, furnished two hundred and seventy-two men for 
the war, which is quite inaccurate ; for the number of those 
in the military and naval service properly credited to the 
town must have been nearly five hundred, as it furnished its 
full quota upon every call of the President for men, and had a 
surplus of thirty-five over and above all demands, at the end 
of the war. Three were commissioned officers in the military 
service. The whole amount of money appropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was thirty-eight thousand five hundred and seventy-four 
dollars and fifteen cents ($38,574.15). 

The amount of money raised by the town, and expended 
each year of the war in the payment of State aid to the 
families of volunteers, and which was afterwards refunded 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $93.60; 
in 1862, $2,525.57; in 1863, $6,182.23; in 1864, $6,- 



BREWSTER. 31 

851.53; in 1865, 4,100.00. Total in four years, $19,- 
652.93. 

The good work performed by the ladies of Barnstable was 
very considerable. There are three villages in the town, in 
each of which there were regular organized societies. We 
have only brief mention of what was done in two of them. In 
Barnstable proper, the Ladies' Sanitary Association was formed, 
immediately '* after the publication of the circular of the New- 
England Women's Auxiliary Association was received," and 
continued until the close of the war. Mrs. S. B. Phinny was 
president, and Miss E. A. Chamberlain was secretary, most 
of the time. They made 3,153 articles, and $768 were raised 
in money. Hundreds of yards of bandages were made, boxes 
of lint, and a large quantity of preserves, &c. The ladies 
were untiring in their zeal. There was also " a Children's Aid 
Society," — a branch of the New-England Women's Auxiliary 
Association. It began in 1862, and continued until the close 
of the war, of which Miss Cordelia E. Phinny was president. 
1,276 articles were made, and $106 were raised in money, by 
this society of little people. 

The Centreville Ladies' Soldiers' Relief Society continued in 
operation "one year ten months and eight days." Their re- 
ceipts were $409.74. They sent two boxes of clothing to the 
** New-England Women's Auxiliary Association and one box to 
the Christian Commission." Of this society Mrs. Margaret 
Handy was president, and Miss Amanda Crosby secretary. 
We make the following extract : — 

" When the time arrived that our services were no longer needed, 
we had considerable money and clothing on hand, which were disposed 
of in gifts to our returned soldiers, and those who were sufferiDg in 
consequence of the war, and to associations in aid of the war. From 
Jane 1, 1865, to Feb. 7, 18GG, we distributed gifts in money to the 
amoant of $248.86.'' 

Brewster. — Incorporated Feb. 19, 1803. Population in 
1860, 1,489 ; in 1865, 1,459. Valuation in 1860, $636,333 ; 
in 1865, $801,452. The selectmen in 1861 were Tully Crosby, 
Zoeth Snow, Jr., Bandolphus M'Loud; in 1862, Jeremiah 




:J^ MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Muyo, Willittin Winslow, C. S. Foster; in 1863, Jeremiah 
Ma\o, {\ S. Foster, William Winslow; in 1864, Solomon 
b'uH'iiiaii, Hailey Foster, Strabo Clark ; in 1865, Solomon Free- 
iimu, iloriuiiiah Mayo, C. S. Foster. 

'riiu ti»wn-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years 
w «i« ( 1iurlc8 S. Foster. 

I M\ I . The first town-meeting, to consider matters in relation 
Id llio war, was held May 2l8t, at which it was voted to appro- 
iiiiuUt Hvo hundred dollars to *'the Massachusetts Soldiers' Aid 
Kuiul." A committee of three was appointed "to see that the 
iKuiilii^M of all volunteers were comfortably provided for ; " and 
(lui triMiMurfr was authorised to borrow money when necessary 
lot ihu above purposes. 

\H{\2, July 2l8t, A bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars 
^Mi4 u»lt'd "to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, 
iihd b(i oivditcd to the quota of the town, and fifty dollars addi- 
llnhiil lo tlioHo who shall enlist within forty-eight hours." A 
luiiiiuilUHt wan elected to help the selectmen in recruiting volun- 
liM lit. AugUMt 2r)th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dolliiin li» volunteers enlisting to the credit of the town in 
\\\\\ uino un»uthd' service, and to pay eleven dollars a month to 
(.ai h ul' I heir families while in the service. 

IhOit. Ihu'-oinber 1st, The treasurer was authorized to bor- 
\yi\\ \\U\\M\ hundred dollars for recruiting purposes, "if it shall 

I Mil I At tho annual March meeting it was voted that all 
\\\\* Im-Uu'm of HMTuiting "be left with the selectmen, and that 
{\\\\ ln» iuUlM»i'i/<id to use any money they may find in the 
^U'HMiy liu' ihnt purpose." March 2l8t, Voted to raise two 
0\\\u»'UmI tlollai'i* for recruiting purposes, "if legal." June 
\ \\\\. \ nhnl, lt» |my a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five 
\\\\\I'\H <^' *'"*'* vtihuitecr who shall enlist for three years, and 
\\v \v\»\IU**d ^*» *'»** quota of the town; and the treasurer was 
A\\Os\^^ *-*■*' •*' h»iiniw the money "when needed." 

\\\\\ \ U Uio uiuiuftl March meeting, " Voted, to raise three 
^l\\\N\*vSS^^i \\\»Uw»« ( i*' n«twled) for recruiting purposes." 

^*s\'\\'»W* tuniUliwI tuio hundred and forty-one men for the war, 
^^\^^vh \\»^» ** •UVjilu* of seventeen over and above all demands. 



CHATHAM. 33 

None of them were commissioned oflScers in the military ser- 
vice. There were probably some in the navy. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town for 
war purposes, exclusive of State aid to soldiers' families, was 
nineteen thousand four hundred and fifty-three dollars and 
seventy-three cents ($19,453.73). A considerable amount 
was voluntarily contributed by private citizens. 

The amount raised and expended by the town for aid to sol- 
diers' families, and afterwards reimbursed to it by the State, 
was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $291.96; in 1863, 
$1,024.00; in 1864, $1,819.20; in 1865, $1,221.07. Total, 
$4,356.23. 

The ladies of Brewster in 1862 organized a Soldiers' Aid 
Society, which continued in operation until the close of the war, 
and did much good. 

Chatham. — Incorporated June 11, 1712. Population in 
1860, 2,710; in 1865, 2,637. Valuation in 1860, $886,157 ; 
in 1865, $1,000,543. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were 
Josiah Hardy, Benjamin F. Freeman, Levi Eldridge, Jr. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during the same years 
was Josiah Mayo. 

1861. Several citizens' meetings were held in Chatham dur- 
ing this year, at which action both by word and deed was taken 
to place the town in its true position as regards the war ; but 
no formal town-meeting was called, as none was necessary. 

1862. On the 22d of July a legal town-meeting was held, 
at which it was voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to 
each volunteer who would enlist for three years' military service, 
when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town ; also 
to pay, to assist the family of each volunteer residing in the 
town, an amount not to exceed eighteen dollars a month.* 
August 25th, Another meeting was held, at which it was voted 
to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volun- 
teer for nine months' service, when credited to the quota of the 



* Tills was six doUan more per month than the State would reimbone. 

8 



• J.*-" 1 !■_*._/ 



84 MASSACHUSETTS IS THE REBELLION. 

town, and to pay his family the same amount of assistance as 
paid to the families of three- years volunteers. 

1863. On the 3d of February a town-meeting was held, to 
consider the action of the selectmen, and the responsibilities 
they had incurred in behalf of the town. Up to this date they 
had borrowed eight thousand dollars on their individual notes, 
which they had expended in the payment of bounties and 
other necessary expenditures. The town voted unanimously to 
assume their entire liability, by giving the notes of the town, 
to run for five years. The same meeting refused to pay a 
bounty to two men who were residents of another town, al- 
though they had been credited to the miltary quota of Chatham. 
On the 8th of December, Christopher Taylor, 2d, Edmund 
Flynn, and David H. Crowell were chosen by ballot to aid 
the selectmen in recruiting volunteers to fill the quota of the 
town; also voted, "that there be a general meeting of the 
citizens of the town held every Tuesday evening until the 5th 
of January next, to commence on Tuesday evening next at six 
o'clock," to encourage recruiting, and to consider measures by 
which to fill the quota of the town. 

1864. On the 3d of February the town voted to "pay four 
dollars a month to each person dependent on a volunteer for 
support, provided the amount to any one family shall not ex- 
ceed eighteen dollars a month." 

1865. On the 1st of January a large meeting of citizens 
was held, at which, after discussion, it was voted to raise by 
voluntary subscription a sufficient sum from which to pay to 
each volunteer who will enlist in the service of the United States, 
and be credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars ; and a paper having been prepared, 
thirty-two hundred and five dollars were subscribed by those 
present at the meeting, which fully sufficed to fill the quota ; 
and at a legal town-meeting, held on the 6th of April succeed- 
ing, the persons advancing the money were reimbursed by the 
town. 

We may as well state here as anywhere that the town in 
1866, after the war was over, voted to refund to every citizen 
the money he had subscribed and paid to furnish volunteers ; 



DENNIS. 35 

and also to pay to persons who had furnished substitutes, who 
were credited to the town, the money they had paid to pro- 
cure them. 

Chatham funushed two hundred and sixty-four men for the 
war, which was a surplus of thirty-two over and above all 
demands. Five were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-seven thousand 
six hundred and eleven dollars and sixty-nine cents ($27,- 
611.69). 

The amount raised and expended by the town during the 
four years of the war for aid to the families of volunteers, 
and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $809.59; in 1863, 
$1,706.80; in 1864, $2,635.00; in 1865, $1,436.03. Total 
amount, $6,487.42. 

Dennis. — Incorporated June 19, 1793. Population in 
1860,3,662; in 1865, 3,512. Valuation in 1860, $1,108,- 
054; in 1865, $1,181,399. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were 
Joshua C. Howes, Alvan Small, Elijah Baxter. 

The town-elerk during the same years was Isaiah Nickerson. 
The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Isaiah 
Nickerson; in 1865, Jonathan Bangs. 

1861. There does not appear to have been any action taken 
by the town in its corporate capacity in relation to the war 
during this year, although meetings of citizens were held, and 
every thing was done which the occasion required. Of these 
citizens' meetings no record appears to have been preserved, or, 
if there were, we have failed to obtain a copy of it, which 
we much regret. 

1862. A special town-meeting was held July 26th, to act 
upon war matters ; at which a committee of six gentlemen were 
appointed to act with the selectmen in recruiting volunteers to> 
fill the quota required of the town, under the call of the Presi- 
dent for three hundred thousand men for three years' military 
service. The town authorized them to pay a bounty to each 




36 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

recruit of two hundred and fifty dollars, when mustered in and 
properly credited to the quota of the town ; or they could be 
paid the bounty before being mustered^ upon ^ giving satisfac- 
tory security to the selectmen that the money would be refunded 
if the volunteer did not pass an examination and was rejected.'* 
The treasurer was authorized to borrow money sufficient to 
meet the expenditure. On the 19th of August another formal 
meeting was held ; and the town voted to pay the same amount 
of bounty to volunteers for nine months' service, three-quarters 
of the amount to be paid to the recruit when accepted, mustered 
in, and credited, and the remaining quarter when he was honor- 
ably discharged from the service. The treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow five thousand dollars to pay the same. 

These appear to have been the most important votes which 
were passed in relation to the payment of bounties. Other 
votes for the payment of State aid to the families of the volun- 
teers were passed each year until the end of the war. Al- 
thou^rh the information received from Dennis is not so full and 
complete as we have received from many of the other towns, 
yet the result shows that few towns were more active in the 
good cause, or came out of the war with a better record. 

Dennis reported in 1866 to have furnished two hundred and 
twenty men for the war, which is considerably below the actual 
number. Including the men in the navy, Dennis must have 
furnished about three hundred and seventy men, as at the end 
of the war the town had filled its quota in every call of the 
President, and had a surplus of forty-three men over and above 
all demands. None of the men in the military service were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclu- 
sive of State aid, was twenty-two thousand six hundred and 
fifty-two dollars and sixty-six cents ($22,652.66). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for aid to the families of volun- 
teers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows : In 1861, $32.00 ; in 1862, $582.63 ; in 1863, 
$952.66; in 1864, $1,334.15; in 1865, $912.17. Total 
amount, $3,813.61. 



EA8THAM. 37 

Eastham. — Incorporated June 2, 1646. Population in 1860, 
779 ; in 1865, 757. Valuation in 1860, $226,795 ; in 1865, 
$219,948. 

The selectmen during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, 
and 1865, were Zara Higgins, Prince S. Harding, Jonathan 
Snow. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Herman 
Doane. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, 
was Herman Doane ; in 1865, Josiah M. Cole. 

1861. There does not appear to have been any action 
taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the 
war during this year. 

1862. On the 28th of July a special town-meeting was 
held, to take measures to fill the quota of the town under thq 
recent call of the President for three hundred thousand three- 
years men ; at which it was voted to authorize the payment of 
a bounty of two hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer who 
would enlist and be credited to the town. The selectmen were 
authorized to borrow one thousand dollars to pay the same. 
An enlistment paper was opened at the meeting, and four young 
men of Eastham immediately enrolled their names as volunteers. 
These filled the quota of the town. The names of the young 
men were Francis Penmore, Henry Morrison, Peter Higgins, 
Nathan A. Gill. The meeting then passed the following reso- 
lutions : — 

Resolved^ That we cherish an unfaltering attachment to the Union 
and the Constitution formed by our patriotic fathers, and deeply 
deplore the cause which has produced such an unhappy alienation be- 
tween the people of the North and South, which has ripened into a 
gigantic rebellion and unprecedented civil war. 

Re»olved^ That we highly approve the judicious and patriotic course 
of the President of the United States in this trying hour, amid the 
jargon of party warfare that is carried on in the high places of the 
nation against the wise provisions and requirements of that time-hon- 
ored Constitution ; and while he continues to stand firmly on that rock 
of our country's salvation, w^e will stand by and maintain him with all 
the men in our power, in his efforts to restore our divided and dis- 
tracted country to its honor and peace. 




38 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

At a meeting held on the 28th of August, the town voted to 
pay a bounty of one hundred and sixty dollars to each volun- 
teer for nine months' service, when mustered in and credited to 
the town. Nine young men immediately enlisted and filled the 
quota of the town. December 5th, Voted, to pay a bounty of 
one hundred and eighty dollars to each of seven men enlisted in 
Boston and credited to Eastham. 

18G3. A special town-meeting was held on the 2d of 
December, when it was voted " that the selectmen use their best 
endeavors to fill the quota of ten men for this town as soon as 
possible, within the town or elsewhere." The treasurer was 
authorized to borrow money to pay the expenses. 

1864. May 3d, The selectmen were directed to ''pay to 
volunteers under any future call a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars." This amount was continued to be paid 
until the end of the war. 

Eastham furnished seventy-seven men for the war, which was 
a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. None were 
commissioned officers. The total amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was three thousand four hundred and seventy-six 
dollars and fifty-four cents ($3,476.54). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for aid to soldiers' families, and 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, 00; in 1862, $111.63; in 1863, $223.20; in 1864, 
$198.40 ; in 1865, $300.00. Total amount, $833.23. 

Falmouth. — Incorporated June 4, 1686. Population in 
1860, 2,456 ; in 1865, 2,294. Valuation in 1860, $1,323,- 
308; in 1865, $1,375,661. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Thomas Lewis, 
Jr., Prince G. Moore, Silas J. Eldred ; in 1864 and 1865, 
Thomas Lewis, Jr., Prince G. Moore, Zenas Hamblin. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the 
war was Thomas Lewis, Jr. 

1861. The following extract from a letter which we re- 
ceived in 1867 from Thomas Lewis, Jr., chairman of the select- 



FALMOUTH. 39 

men, town-clerk and town-treasurer all through the war, in 
regard to Falmouth, will applj to almost every town in Barn- 
stable County : — 

" At the time of the breaking out of the Rebellion, most of our 
young men were pursuing their peculiar avocations upon the seas, and 
most of them on long voyages ; nevertheless we were able to fulfil all 
the requirements of the State and General Governments in furnishing 
men for the war, and when the struggle was over had the satisfaction 
of knowing we had furnished a surplus of ten men." 

The first action taken by the town, in its corporate character, 
was at a special meeting held on the 2d of December ( *^ after 
one of our citizens had enlisted in the Twenty-fourth Massa- 
chusetts Regiment"), at which it was voted to instruct the 
selectmen to aid the families of those who have, or may here- 
after, enlist in the service of the United States. 

1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 2d of 
August, which voted to pay "each volunteer citizen of the 
town, upon his enlisting for three years, a bounty of one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars, and one hundred dollars in addi- 
tion when regularly discharged from the service.*' In addition 
to this bounty of the town, there was raised by voluntary sub- 
scription ten dollars to each volunteer, of whom there were 
twenty-eight who "enlisted on the spot." Of these, twelve 
served until the end of the war; "the others were killed, died 
of disease, or were discharged on account of sickness." On 
the 11th of September another special meeting was held, at 
which the town voted " to pay any of its citizens " a bounty of 
one hundred dollars upon enlistment for nine months' service, 
and a further sum of one hundred dollars when regularly dis- 
charged. " Six immediately enlisted, each of whom served his 
full time." October 13th, The selectmen were authorized to 
enlist men in other places, if a sufficient number could not be 
obtained in Falmouth ; " but in no case to pay any higher bounty 
than that paid to our own citizens." December 15th, The town 
bounty to each volunteer was fixed at two hundred dollars. 

1863. A special meeting was held on the 2l8t of Decem- 
ber, when the selectmen were authorized to draw on the town- 




40 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

treasurer " for such expenses as may be incurred in procuring 
the town's quota of volunteers ; " and they were instructed " to 
proceed forthwith to procure the men required." 

1864. April — , The selectmen were directed ^ to procure 
the number of men required, or which may be required, under 
any order of the President previous to March 1, 1865." Under 
this vote the selectmen acted until the end of the war. 

Falmouth, notwithstanding most of her able-bodied young 
men were at sea, furnished of her own citizens one hundred 
and thirty-eight men for the army, and twenty for the navy, 
making one hundred and fifty-eight of her own people. Nearly 
one hundred must have been obtained from other places. At 
the end of the war, Falmouth had a surplus of ten men over 
and above all demands made upon it. Two were commissioned 
officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was twenty thousand one hundred and fifty-four dollars and 
thirty-five cents ($20,154.35). In addition to this amount, 
eighteen hundred and fifty-four dollars were raised by private 
subscription to encourage enlistments, and six hundred and 
forty-seven doUars for the sick and wounded in hospitals. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war, for aid to the families of vol- 
unteers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows : In 1861, $21.60 ; in 1862, $751.50 ; 
in 1863, $1,371.46; in 1864, $1,450.00; in 1865, $979.34. 
Total amount, $4,674.20. 

The ladies of Falmouth did their full proportion to assist the 
soldiers in the field and in the hospital. Taking *^ in the estimate 
of barrels and boxes forwarded by them, in which were clothes 
and sanitary stores, it is difficult to come to a definite conclusion ; 
but from all that I can learn from those ladies who had the par- 
ticular charge of these matters, I think it may be safely set 
down at twelve hundred dollars." Mr. Lewis, to whom we are 
indebted for much of the information in regard to Falmouth, 
writes : — 

" Although we have no set speeches to record, there was always 
manifest at our meetings a determiued will to do all in our power to 



HARWICH. 41 

bring the Rebellion to an end ; and could you have been present at the 
gatherings of the fair sex, as they so often met to ply their fingers in 
preparing articles for the comfort and relief of the sick and dying, 
you would have heard such words of patriotism as flow from no other 
hearts. There is one case of sacrifice to which I cannot forbear to 
allude. During the Rebellion, three sons of a very poor citizen of 
our town enlisted. One was married, and had a family of five little 
children. The aged and poor parents were dependent upon the other 
two for their support. AU three sons were killed in battle/" 

Harwich. — Incorporated Sept. 14, 1694. Population in 
1860, 3,423 ; in 1865, 3,540. Valuation in 1860, $841,833 ; 
in 1865, $1,025,217. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Cyrus Weeks, Thomas Kenrick, 
Isaiah C. Kelly ; in 1862, Benjamin W. Eldridge, Isaiah C. 
Kelly, Sheldon Crowell; in 1863, Isaiah C. Kelly, Thomas 
Kendrick, Sheldon Crowell; in 1864, Joseph C. Berry, Dan- 
forth S. Steele, Shubeal B. Kelly; in 1865, Danforth S. 
Steele, Joseph C. Berry, Shubeal B. Kelly. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years 
was William H. Underwood. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 10th of May, at which it 
was voted to raise a company of one hundred men for a Coast 
Guard ; and a committee of five was appointed to confer with 
the authorities of other towns on the Cape in regard to the 
same. June 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow one 
thousand dollars '' for war purposes." 

1862. April 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who enlists in the military service for 
three years, and is credited to the town. July 26th, The bounty 
was raised to two hundred dollars, and the selectmen were 
directed "to fill the quota of the town as soon as possible." 
August 19th, Voted, to pay volunteers for nine months' service 
a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars, which, on September 
11th, was increased fifty dollars; and Valentine Doane, Jr., 
and Danforth S. Steele were appointed recruiting officers. The 
treasurer was authorized to borrow money. 

1863. August 11th, Voted, to pay drafted men a bounty of 



':ia 



42 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

one hundred and fifty dollars. The treasurer was authorized to 
borrow ten thousand dollars to pay bounties and expenses of 
recruiting. November 30th, Twenty-five hundred dollars were 
authorized to be borrowed ^ to pay charges and assist in recruit- 
ing fifty men." 

1864. March 16th, The selectmen were directed to pay 
each volunteer belonging to that town one hundred dollars, who 
has not already received a bounty ; also to borrow money to 
pay State aid to the families of soldiers. June 21st, Voted, that 
to each drafted man who furnished a substitute there be paid 
not exceeding three hundred dollars, if he was credited to fill 
the quota of the town. Several other meetings were held dur- 
ing the year, at which means were taken to recruit men and 
furnish State aid for the families of soldiers. 

1865. November 7th, Voted, "that the selectmen be au- 
thorized to treat all widows in town, whose husbands have 
fallen in the war, with due and especial benevolence ; and those 
who have no house, to see that they have a home outside of the 
almshouse." 

Harwich furnished three hundred and forty-one men for the 
war, which was a surplus of twenty-nine over and above all 
demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid to soldiers' families, was forty- 
two thousand five hundred and sixty dollars and two cents 
($42,560.02). 

The amount raised and expended by the town for aid to the 
families of soldiers, and afterwards repaid by the State, was as 
follows : In 1861, 00 ; in 1862, $736.38 ; in 1863, $1,276.69 ; 
in 1864, $5,159.92 ; in 1865, $4,374.00. Total in four years, 
$11,462.99. 

The ladies of Harwich " did a great deal for the soldiers all 
through the war," and especially those attached to the several 
religious societies, — the ministers acting as shipping agents. 
Many meetings were held, at which under-clothing, lint, band- 
ages, and other necessary articles, were made, which were sent 
to the army hospitals. 



ORLEANS. 43 

Orleans. — Incorporated March 3, 1797. Population in 
1860, 1,678 ; in 1865, 1,586. Valuation in 1860, $487,914; 
in 1865, $558,858. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Joseph Cummings, Calvin Snow, 
George W. Cummings ; in 1862 and 1863, Jesse C. Snow, 
John Kenrick, Edmund Crosby ; in 1864 and 1865, John Ken- 
rick, Truman Doane, Ira Mayo. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, 
was Thomas Higgins ; in 1864 and 1865, Freeman Mayo. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 27th of May, at which the 
following resolutions were read, and unanimously adopted : — 

Resolvedy That, as true and loyal citizens of the United States, we 
will cherish inviolate the Union and the Constitution and the enforce- 
ment of the laws, believing them to be the only safe palladium of our 
liberties, under which as a nation we have been favored with unex- 
ampled prosperity. 

Resolvedj That the active measures now being made by the National 
Administration, in all departments, for the successful crushing out of the 
unnatural rebellion on the part of the so-called Southern Confederacy, 
meets with our warmest approbation, and should have the aid and en- 
couragement of every true lover of his country, without regard to party 
proclivities. 

Besolvedj That as, in the language of Jefferson, ^' the price of Liberty 
is eternal vigilance," it becomes the sacred duty of every loyal citizen, 
in this hour of his country's peril, to frown down with abhorrence any 
attempt to aid and abet treason, whether at home or abroad, expressed 
or implied ; and that we will use our best endeavors to give traitors 
that punishment which they so justly deserve. 

Retolvedf That the patriotic stand taken by Massachusetts in re- 
sponding with alacrity to the requirements of the President for troops 
to defend the national capital is worthy of all praise, and is an earnest 
of that spirit which has ever characterized the citizens of the Old 
Bat State, — in times of danger and alarm to manfully uphold and 
defend the glorious stripes and stars even unto death. 

The resolutions having been adopted, the town authorized 
the selectmen to borrow one thousand dollars for the payment 
of State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the act 
recently passed by the Legislature in extra session. 




44 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1862. A special town-meeting, to act upon matters relating 
to the war, was held on the 19th of July. At this meeting "a 
secesh flag," taken at the capture of New Orleans, was pre- 
sented to the town by Captain Josiah Snow, formerly a citizen 
of Orleans. The town then voted to pay each of its citizens 
who would enlist in the military service of the United States, 
and be credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars ; " and to pay town aid of one dollar a 
week to each parent, wife, or child of every volunteer so en- 
listing." 

1863. No formal town-meeting to act upon matters con- 
nected with the Rebellion appears to have been held during this 
year, although the greatest activity prevailed among the citizens 
in recruiting volunteers, and giving proper assistance to the sol- 
diers' families. 

1864. At a meeting held on the 25th of April, the town 
voted " to raise the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
for each and every one of its quota called for by the President, 
Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864; and that the sum be ex- 
pended in refunding money paid by individual subscription, 
in procuring this town's proportion of troops called for at the 
aforesaid dates." Two other meetings were held during this 
year, but no change was made in the manner of recruiting men 
or in the payment of bounties. 

1865. At the meeting held on the 6th of March, the fol- 
lowing vote was passed : — 

Voted, " To pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars each for four- 
teen men recruited as part of the quota of Orleans, under the call for 
troops, Dec. 17, 1864, and to deposit one thousand dollars with the 
State treasurer to secure a portion of the men recruited from the rebel 
States." 

The amount of money raised by private subscription, during 
the four years of the war, amounted in the aggregate to eigh- 
teen thousand three hundred and eleven dollars and twenty-two 
cents for the enlistment of seventy-six men, which was subse- 
quently refunded by vote of the town, at the rate of one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars for each of the men recruited. 



ORLEANS. 45 

Orleans fiimished one hundred and seventy-seven men for the 
war, which was a surplus of twenty-nine over and above all 
demands. Three were commissioned officers. The amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the 
war, exclusive of State aid, was eighteen thousand four hundred 
and ninety-seven dollars and twenty cents ($18,497.20). 

The amount raised and expended by the town for State aid to 
soldiers' families during the four years of the war, but which 
was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $12.00; in 1862, $336.1)6; in 1863, $1,109.77; 
in 1864, $1,778.35; in 1865, $1,093.20. Total amount, 
$4,365.28. 

The ladies of Orleans formed ''a Soldiers' Aid Society in 
September, 1862, which continued in active operation until 
April, 1865. They held about seventy meetings, to prepare 
articles for the soldiers. They raised, in money, $621.08," 
which was increased fourfold by being judiciously expended 
for material, that was made into articles of clothing. Many 
boxes and barrels were filled with their contributions, ^* some of 
which were sent to the soldiers in camp, some to the sick and 
wounded in hospitals, and some to the prisoners in Libby Prison." 
As a sample of each, we give the contents of one, sent Oct. 14, 
1862, to the Sanitary Commission : 2 pillows, 1 under-shirt, 21 
towels, 4 handkerchiefs, 21 shirts, 18 do., 53 pillow-cases, 3 
boxes of lint, 1 bundle of pieces, 7 prs. slippers, 3 prs. drawers, 
3 prs. socks, 368 yards bandages, 9 dozen stump bandages, 3 
dozen hand do., 13 dozen comforters, "a few pamphlets," 10 
sheets, 24 pillow-cases, 53 towels, 23 cotton shirts, 75 pillows, 
5 vests, 3 frock coats, 11 flannel under-shirts, 6 packages (in- 
dividuals), 1 bedquilt, 3 prs. drawers, 3 prs. slippers, 2 prs. 
pants, 7 prs. mittens, 29 prs. socks, 28 prs. flannel drawers, 
1 pr. boots, 38 handkerchiefs, 51 white do., 25 colored do. 

The society numbered one hundred and fifty-one members. 
The journal of their proceedings closes with the following 
words : — 

^ The meeting adjourns to meet again whenever the needs of sufler- 
ing soldiers should demand, — we hope never again." 



46 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Provincetown. — Incorporated June 14, 1727. Population 
in 1860, 3,206; in 1865, 3,475. Valuation in 1860, $1,263,- 
695; in 1865, $1,576,146. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Robert Soper, 
Abraham Chapman, Simeon S. Gifford ; in 1864, Simeon S. 
GifFord, Silas S. Young, Lysander S. Paine; in 1865, Silas 
S. Young, Simeon S. Gifford, Alexander Manuel. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was Elisha Dyer. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 2d of May, at which it 
was voted to pay a sum of twenty dollars to every able-bodied 
man who should volunteer from Provincetown in either the army 
or navy, to be paid on his departure from the town to join for 
service ; also *' the sum of ten dollars a month for single men, 
and men having wives only, and fifteen dollars a month to men 
having families, while in the service, which pay shall begin at 
the time his government pay begins." At the same meeting the 
following preamble and resolutions were read and adopted : — 

Whereas it has pleased Grod to give us the grandest country on the 
globe, with the best government, as established by our fathers, ever 
inhabited by mortals ; and as it is satisfactorily ascertained that a long- 
cherished scheme has been entertained, by miserable miscreants, to 
subvert this government to the most dastardly purposes of iniquity, 
destroying the Union and the Constitution ; and as we regard this 
as an unprovoked, barbarous, and sacrilegious attack upon the dearest 
rights and interests of the American people, we denounce it as a vil- 
lanous attempt to subvert laws and to destroy a Constitution which 
we reverence, and which they have sworn to support : we therefore 

Resolve, That the loss of our liberty and national bouor would be a 
greater calamity than war, the loss of property, or of life itself. 

Resolvedy That it is the duty of the Executive to bring the whole 
power of the Grovemment to crush out secession and rebellion, and to 
put to an efficient end their disturbances ; and that no favor or compro- 
mise should be suffered, but upon the basis of unqualified submission 
of those in rebellion. 

Resolved, That we pledge to the National and State Grovernments a 
hearty support of men and means, by which these ends may be accom- 
plbhed. 



PROVINCETOWN. 47 

Re$olvedj That, if the wanton cruelties of privateering are let loose 
upon our seamen, it will become our duty vigorously to defend our 
rights and fearlessly to assail our foe, until, under our flag of the stars 
and stripes^ our vessels are allowed, unmolested, to float in every 
sea. 

Other votes were passed having for their object home defence, 
which the exposed position of the town appeared to render 
desirable. A committee of six were also appointed to assist in 
recruiting. 

1862. At a meeting held on the 22d of July, it was voted 
to raise sixteen hundred dollars, by taxation, *^ to pay bounties 
to persons who have become volunteer soldiers of the United 
States ; " also to raise and pay to volunteers having families in 
Provincetown *^ a sum of money, in addition to that the town 
may be reimbursed from the treasury of the Commonwealth for 
aid to families, equal in amount to that which is reimbursed ; 
and to volunteers who have not families or persons dependent 
on them the sum of fifty dollars a year during their term of 
service.*' August 27th, The town voted " to assume the liability 
of those individuals who have subscribed money for the payment 
of bounties to volunteers for nine months' military service ; " 
also voted to pay each volunteer for nine months' service, when 
mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of 
two hundred dollars ; also, to pay their families, and to those 
who have none, fifty dollars additional in money. The treas- 
urer was authorized to borrow six thousand dollars for these 
purposes. 

1863. At a legal town-meeting held on the 20th of July, the 
selectmen and John Nickerson were appointed to procure arms 
from the State or the National Government, and to do all such 
acts as may be necessary for the defence and protection of the 
town against the attacks of the enemy. Two thousand dollars 
were placed at the disposal of the committee. September 3d, 
The town appropriated $5,469.82 for payment of soldiers' 
bounties, in compliance with the 9th section of an act approved 
April 29, 1863 ; also voted, that the same provision be made 
in aid of the families of men who may be drafted as is now paid 
to the fiimilies of volunteers. 



48 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1864. February 8th, The town voted to assume the payment 
of money contributed by individuals to fill the quota of the town, 
under the last call of the President, " provided any act of the 
Legislature legalizes the same." April 12th, An act having been 
passed, the town voted to reimburse to individuals the money 
they had advanced, provided that the amount should not exceed 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each volunteer enlisted. 

Provincetown must have furnished for the army and navy 
about three hundred and fifty men, although the selectmen re- 
turned, in 1866, only two hundred and forty-seven ; as at the 
end of the war the town had filled its quota on every call of the 
President, and had a surplus of fifty-seven men over and above 
all demands. Three were commissioned officers in the military 
service. The whole amount of money appropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was thirty-seven thousand 
four hundred and fifty-two dollars ($37,452.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended for State aid dur- 
ing the four years of the war, and which was afterwards reim- 
bursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $57.54 ; 
in 1862, $327.98; in 1863, $775.21 ; in 1864, $3,070.59; m 
1865, $3,136.92. Total amount reimbursed, $7,368.24. It 
will be observed, however, that Provincetown paid to the 
families of volunteers double the amount reimbursed by the 
State. 

The ladies of Provincetown organized a " Soldiers' Aid So- 
ciety" and a "Soldiers' Relief Society" in 1862. During the 
war, the first-named furnished clothing and other articles for the 
soldiers to the value of $1,226.75, and the last-named con- 
tributed to the value of $1,064.90. Most of the articles were 
sent to the Sanitary and Christian Commissions, though a part 
was sent direct to Lieutenant-Colonel Ryder, a citizen of Prov- 
incetown, of the Thirty-third Regiment Massachusetts Volun- 
teers. 

Provincetown, which is situated on the extreme end of Cape 
Cod, was one of the most exposed places on the coast. During 
the war, earth-works were erected by the Government, which 
were garrisoned by a company of volunteers. 



SANDWICH. 49 

Sandwich. — Incorporated Sept. 3, 1639. Population in 
1860, 4,479; in 1865, 4,105. Valuation in 1860, $1,644,- 
433; in 1865, $1,699,105. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Mason White, 
Seth B. Wing, Isaiah Fish ; in 1864, H. G. O. Ellis, Seth 
B. Wing, Isaiah Fish ; in 1865, H. G. O. Ellis, Paul Wing, 
Isaiah Fish. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, 
was David C. Freeman ; from June, 1863, and during 1864 and 
1865, David C. Percival. 

The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating 
to the %war, was held on the 11th of May ; * at which Messrs. 
Theodore Kern, Jonathan Leonard, Charles Southack, Benja- 
min F. Brown, and Charles Dillingham were chosen a commit- 
tee, *' to see what action the town should take in regard to war 
matters." The committee reported as follows : — 

First, That the treasurer of the town be authorized, with 
the assent and at the discretion of the selectmen, to borrow a 
sum not exceeding four thousand dollars, ^Mn sums as shall be 
needed " for the benefit of the families of those in this town 
who may enlist " in the service of the Government, in defence 
of our constitutional liberties." Second, That the money so 
borrowed shall be disbursed by the selectmen " in the following 
manner : " "A man that leaves a wife shall receive two dollars 
a week ; a wife and child, three dollars a week ; and fifty cents 
a week for each additional child under fourteen years of age." 



* It is proper to state that a public meeting was held in April in tlie Town 
Hall, notice of which had been given hy posters and' the ringing of church-bells, 
an account of which we find in the " Sandwich Eepublican " of April, 1861. 
" Several gentlemen made speeches, among whom was Major S. B. Phinny, 
editor of the 'Barnstable Patriot,' a democratic paper. He was frequently in- 
terrupted by the spontaneous and hearty applause of the audience whenever 
any allusion was made to our Flag, the Constitution, and the Union. On motion 
of Theodore Kern, Esq., it was voted that the sum of $20 be immediately 
raise<l by subscription, as a bounty for each man who would enUst in the cam- 
paign. Six hundred and twenty dollars were pledged in the course of the even- 
ing in sums varying from $5 to $70, — Major Phinny contributing the seventy 
dollars, and promising a stand of colors to the company when fonned.'' The 
Sandwich company was formed, and was among the first three-years companies 
that went to the war. 

4 



50 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Third, That the selectmen be authorized and instructed to 
assist such families as are dependent upon any volunteer for 
their support, to whom in their judgment the above rule does 
not apply. Fourth, That the town furnish the military com- 
pany of Sandwich, "when called for and officially accepted, a 
suitable uniform." 

The report was accepted. It was then voted that all citi- 
zens of Sandwich ** volunteering in companies in other towns, 
having families, and also all persons from other towns volun- 
teering in the Sandwich company, having families, be included 
in the above appropriation ; provided, there shall not be an ap- 
propriation for them by the towns from which they came, or in 
which our citizens have volunteered." Voted, that the families 
of volunteers " receive their money once in two weeks ; " also 
voted, "to raise five hundred dollars to defray the expense of 
purchasing uniforms for the Sandwich company." At a special 
meeting held on the 6th of July, it was voted "to ratify and 
continue the above action of the town as allowed by act of May 
23d, 1861." 

1862. At the annual town-meeting held March 3d, a suffi- 
cient sum of money was appropriated to continue the pay of 
State aid to the families of volunteers during the year. A 
special town-meeting was held on the 2d of August, at which 
it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each vol- 
unteer who enlists for three years' military service and is mustered 
in and credited to the quota of the town, and fifty dollars 
additional to each man who shall enlist and be credited within 
seven days. Another meeting was held on the 23d of Decem- 
ber, at which the selectmen were authorized to appoint persons 
to assist them in recruiting volunteers, and extending the amount 
of bounty to each volunteer to one hundred and fifty dollars. 
December 9th, The town voted to enlist volunteers for three 
years' service and not for nine months, and to pay to each volun- 
teer for that term a bounty of two hundred dollars. 

1863. Several " war-meetings " were held during this year : 
recruiting, the payment of bounties to volunteers, and aid to 
their families were continued ; but no special action was taken 
by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war. 



TRURO. 51 

1864. A legal town-meeting was held on the 9th of April, 
at which seventy-eight hundred dollars were appropriated " to 
fill the quotas of the town " under the calls of the President for 
men, Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864. 

Mr. Colly, the town-clerk, writes : — 

** I have sent you all the votes of importance relating to the war. 
Many other votes were passed, and much excitement existed during 
these years of trial ; but they were so similar to the within, that to 
repeat them would be useless." 

Sandwich must have furnished for the army and navy about 
four hundred men, although the return made by the selectmen 
in 1866 gives the number of two hundred and ninety-two. 
At the end of the war, after having filled its quota upon 
every call of the President for volunteers. Sandwich had a sur- 
plus of two, over and above all demands. Twelve were com- 
missioned ofiicers in the military service, the most distinguished 
of whom was Charles Chipman, Major of the Twenty-ninth 
Massachusetts regiment, who was mortally wounded Aug. 7, 
1864, and died the next day. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was thirty-three thousand and eighty-one 
dollars and ninety-nine cents ($33,081.99). 

The amount raised and expended by the town during the 
four years of »the war, for aid to the families of volunteers, and 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $1,852.71; in 1862, $5,018.31; in 1863, $5,742.63; 
in 1864, $4,874.91; in 1865, $2,450.00. Total amount in 
four years, $19,938.56. 

The ladies of Sandwich " were actively engaged in their part 
of the work, but am unable to give you details of the matter." 

Truro. — Incorporated July 16, 1709. Population in 
1860, 1,583; in 1865, 1,448. Valuation in 1860, $381,429; 
in 1865, $361,717. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Solomon Davis, Wil- 
liam T. Newcomb, Asa Sellew; in 1863, Abraham C. Small, 
Solomon Davis, Amasa Paine ; in 1864, John Kenny, James 



52 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Collins, Nathan K. Whorf ; in 1865, John Kenny, James Col- 
lins, Sears Rich. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years 
was Samuel C. Paine. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate character, during this year in regard to matters 
relating to the war. 

1862. At a legal town-meeting held on the 25th of July, 
the following resolution was adopted by a unanimous vote : — 

Resolved, That there be allowed and paid by the town to each of 
the dependants of the four volunteers who have enlisted to make up 
the quota of Truro, the sum of one dollar a week, in addition to the 
sum allowed by the State, so long as the men are in the service of the 
United States ; provided it shall not exceed the sum of twelve dollars 
a month for the dependants of any one volunteer. 

The selectmen were authorized to draw " orders on the town 
treasury for the sum of one hundred dollars, to be paid to each 
and any to the number of four of the inhabitants of Truro, 
who, as the quota of said town, may volunteer and be duly 
mustered into the volunteer service of the United States.** 
August 30th, Voted, that there be paid " to each single man ** 
the sum of two hundred dollars, who shall volunteer to make 
up the quota of nine-months men ; " and to each married man 
who shall thus volunteer the sum of one hundred dollars ; and 
to the dependants of said married man an additional sum equal 
to that granted by the State." December 2d, Voted, "that the 
town of Truro make all the effort that is in its power to raise 
volunteers to fill its quota of nine-months men for the military 
service of the United States," and that Frederick A. Gross, 
Amasa Paine, and A. H. Newton "be a committee to draft 
some plan for raising the aforesaid volunteers," This committee 
reported that the selectmen be authorized to offer a bounty of 
two hundred dollars to any of the citizens of the town who 
would volunteer to make up said quota, and in case they fail to 
procure the required number within a reasonable time, then 
they may use their own discretion in obtaining them elsewhere. 
The report was accepted. "Voted, that we, as a town, disap- 
prove of a draflt." 



TRURO. 53 

1863. February 4th, The following resolutions were 
adopted : — 

Resolved, At this town -meeting, that we do take means and meas- 
ures to bring home the remains of Edward Winslow, one of our sol- 
diers who went forth in the defence of his country and to maintain one 
of the best governments on earth. 

Resolved^ That the selectmen be instructed to cause the remains of 
Edward Winslow to be removed to this town at the town's expense. 

It was also voted to pay the widow and orphan children of 
Edward Winslow a gratuity of one hundred dollars. April 
6th, '* Voted, that the town assume the responsibility that those 
persons took upon themselves, of paying a bounty to Samuel 
Knowles and Hezekiah P. Hughes, in July last, as volunteers." 
August 7th, Voted, to pay the same State aid to the families of 
men who may be drafted " and actually enter the service of the 
United States as has been furnished to the families of volun- 
teers." December 11th, A committee of twenty-five was chosen 
to assist the selectmen in recruiting volunteers to fill the quota 
of the town ; also voted, " to sanction the doings of the select- 
men in using all discretionary means in their power for raising 
volunteers, and that the town be responsible for their compen- 
sation." 

1864. February 4th, Voted, "to allow town aid to the de- 
pendants of volunteers who have enlisted in our town under 
the call of the President, Oct. 17, 1863, in amount to what 
is received by them for State aid ; also to the widows, like town 
aid." * April 25th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer who shall enlist prior to March 1, 1865, for three years, 
and be credited to the town. 

Truro furnished one hundred and forty-four men for the war, 
which was a surplus of fourteen over and above all demands. 
One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 

* This vote was in effect to give aid to the families of volunteers in twice the 
aznoant that was allowed by law and reimbursed to the towns by the State. It 
I literal voluntary gratuity by the town. 



1 



54 MASSACHUSETTS CT THE BEBELUOK. 

exclusive of State aid to soldiers' families, was four thousand 
seven hundred and eighty-six dollars and ten cents ($4,786.10). 
In addition to this sum, four thousand dollars were contributed 
bj private citizens of their own means to paj bounties and 
encourage recruiting. 

The amount of money raised for the payment of aid to sol- 
diers' families, and afterwards refunded by the State, was as fol- 
lows : In 1861, $6.00; in 1862, $383.46; in 1863, $877.96; 
in 1864, $802.80 ; in 1865, $258.58. Total amount in four 
years, $2,328.81. 

Wellfleet. — Incorporated June 16, 1763. Population in 
1860, 2,322 ; in 1865, 2,298. Valuation in 1860, $617,596 ; 
in 1865, $700,165. 

The selectmen from February, 1861, to February, 1864, were 
Edward Hopkins, Robert G. Paine, Jeremiah Hawes. In 
1864, Mr. Ilawes retired from office ; and Jonathan Chipman 
was elected in his place, who with the others remained in office 
until February, 1865. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the 
war was Xoah Swett. 

1861. Several members of the Third Regiment Massachu- 
setts Militia, which left the State April 17th and arrived at 
Fortress Monroe, Va., on the 20th, belonged to Wellfleet. On 
the — of ^lay, a meeting was held, at which a vigilance com- 
mittee was appointed; and a vote was passed to request the 
Governor to furnish arms for a military company then being 
organized in the town.* June 3d, The town appropriated 
seven hundred dollars, subject to the order of the Governor, 
^ to sustain the credit of the State," and three hundred dollars 
"for the benefit of Wellfleet soldiers then at the front." 

1862. July, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dol- 
lars to each volunteer for three years' service, when mustered 
in and credited to the quota of the town, and aid not to exceed 
twelve dollars a month to each of their families. August 14th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each of seven 

* At this time a large proportion of the young men belonging to Wellfleet 
were engaged in sea service. 



YARMOUTH. 55 

men who will enlist for three years to complete the quota of 
the town. 

1863. November 24th, A committee to recruit volunteers 
to fill the quota of the town under the pending call of the 
President was elected, and twenty-five hundred dollars were 
appropriated to pay the expenses. 

1864. April 16th, The bounty to volunteers for three years' 
service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and 
the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 
Several other meetings were held, at which money was raised 
for war purposes, and measures adopted to fill the contingent of 
the town. 

Wellfleet furnished two hundred and twenty-one men for the 
"war, which was a surplus of twenty-five over and above all 
demands. None were commissioned officers in the military ser- 
vice. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended 
by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid to 
soldiers' families, was eighteen thousand three hundred and 
twenty-four dollars and sixty-seven cents ($18,324.67). Mr. 
Swett, the town-clerk, wrote to us, " that there was contributed 
firom public and private sources about twenty thousand dollars 
for the prosecution of the war. Many of the older citizens 
procured substitutes to represent them in the field." 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to the families of soldiers, and reimbursed by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $27.28; in 1862, 
$271.25; in 1863, $161.00; in 1864, $297.20; in 1865, 
$382.00. Total in four years, $1,138.73. 

The ladies of Wellfleet established a Soldiers' Aid Society 
early in the war, to work for the sick and wounded in hospitals. 
At the end of the war they had an unexpended balance in their 
treasury, which was given in aid of erecting ^*a beautiful marble 
monument to the men of Wellfleet who had died in defence of 
their country in the military and naval service." 

Yarmouth. — Incorporated Sept. 3, 1639. Population in 
1860, 2,752; in 1865, 2,465. Valuation in 1860, $1,162,- 
120; in 1865, $1,440,641. 




56 MASSACnUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Elisha Taylor, Thatcher Taylor, 
Zadock Crowell ; in 1862 and 1863, the same ; in 1864, Zadock 
Crowell, Elisha Taylor, Samuel Matthews ; 1865, Samuel Mat- 
thews, Bniddock Matthews, Zadock Crowell. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer from 1844, and all through 
the Rebellion to the present time, was William P. Davis. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters relat- 
ing to the Rebellion, was held on the 2d of May ; at which the 
following resolutions were presented by Charles F. Swift, and 
unanimously adopted : — 

Resolved^ Ist, That wo feel duly mindful of the sacrifices that were 
made by our fathers to establish the Constitutioa, and per|>etuate the 
Union of the States, and that we remember with especial pride and 
pleasure the patriotic and elRcient part taken by this ancient town in 
the great struggle which resulted in the formation of our existing insti- 
tutions of government. 

2d, That, as citizens of Yarmouth, in common with patriotic men 
everywhere in the country, we feel a profound interest in the struggle 
now convulsing the land; that our earnest sympathies are entirely with 
the administration in its efforts to sustain the Government, and defend 
the Hag of the nation ; and that, as in days of yore, we are ready to 
contribute our personal efforts and material aid to uphold and main- 
tain the national honor untarnished by sea and land. 

3d, That, inasmuch as the head of the rebel organization of the 
South has indicated liis design to send out upon the ocean piratical 
crafts for the purposes of spoliation and plunder upon the commerce of 
the country, thus perilling the lives and property of those who follow 
the seas for a livelihood, it is especially incumbent upon the citizens 
of this community, who have so much at stake, to lend efficient and 
cheerful aid in bringing these pests of the ocean to condign punish- 
ment ; and we hereby recommend that the best energies of our people 
be especially directed to strengthening the maritime arm of our national 
service, to which their pursuits and training so peculiarly fit them to 
lend efficiency and strength. 

The town voted to give each citizen who should enlist, either 
in the army or navy, twenty- five dollars a month while in ser- 
vice ; and five dollars additional to his wife, if he has one, and 
three dollars additional to each child under fifteen years of age. 



YARMOUTH. 57 

Three thousand dollars waa voted to equip each volunteer who 
should enlist in the military service.* 

1862. July 3d, Frederick Dunbar, Matthew C. Hallet, N. 
C. Fowler, E. B. Pemler, Isaiah Sherman, and Theodore Drew 
were appointed to procure enlistments, and to pay each volun- 
teer for three years' service a bounty of one hundred dollars 
when mustered in, and one hundred dollars when honorably dis- 
charged, and a further sum of fifteen dollars upon his enlisting. 
The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding thirty-five 
hundred dollars '* for the foregoing purposes." Seven persons 
immediately enlisted. August 14th, Voted, to pay a bounty of 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting 
to the credit of the town for nine months' service. The treasurer 
was authorized to borrow money. December 4th, The select- 
men were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of 
the town, " and more if necessary." The treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow money to pay bounties. 

1863. December 1st, The town chose Nathaniel C. Fowler, 
Oliver Gorham, and David Matthews to co-operate with the 
selectmen in raising the town's quota of volunteers under the late 
call of the President for more men. The selectmen were author- 
ized to draw upon the town- treasurer " for such reasonable sums 
as they shall deem necessary for recruiting purposes." Decem- 
ber 10th, Freeman Howes was added to the above committee. 

1864. April 2 2d, Voted, to raise six thousand dollars, " to pay 
each recruit who enlisted to fill the quota of the town under the 
last two calls of the President one hundred and twenty-five dol- 
lars each." One thousand dollars was also voted to pay boun- 
ties to men who had enlisted to the credit of the town and had 
received no bounty. The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money to procure volunteers '* under any call which the Presi- 
dent might issue." August 6th, The selectmen were authorized 
to deposit fifteen hundred dollars with the State treasurer " to 
procure recruits." December 19th, Voted, that the selectmen 



* It was subsequently ascertained that the town had no authority to raise 
money for the purposes mentioned, and the selectmen declined to act thereon. 






58 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

be authorized to procure recruits ^* in anticipation of a call for 
five hundred thousand men.*' 

Yarmouth must have furnished about two hundred and fifty 
men for the war, which was a surplus of five over and above 
all demands, none of whom were commissioned officers in the 
military service. There were fifteen who were volunteer offi- 
cers in the navy, and three of the principal pilots on the South- 
Carolina coast were citizens of Yarmouth. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town for war pur- 
poses, exclusive of State aid to soldiers' families, was seventeen 
thousand and seventeen dollars ($17,017). This does not 
include $3,592.10, voluntarily contributed by private citizens 
to pay bounties. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
aid to soldiers' families, and afterwards reimbursed by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $506.43; 
in 1863, $1,475.04; in 1864, $1,309.93; in 1865, $1,223.31. 
Total in four years, $4,514.71. 



CHAPITER III. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 



Berkshirb is the most westerly county in the Commonwealth. 
It is bounded north by Bennington County, Vermont ; west 
by Rensselaer and Columbia Counties, New York; south by 
Litchfield County, Connecticut ; and east by Franklin, Hamp- 
shire, and Hampden Counties, Massachusetts. In parts it 
is rough and hilly, but has many beautiful and picturesque 
streams and valleys. The Housatonic and Hoosick are its 
chief rivers ; the former empties into Long Island Sound, and 
the latter into the Hudson River. The Hoosack and Grey- 
lock, which are partly in the town of Adams, are its chief 
mountains. Under the former, a tunnel for a railroad, four 
miles in length, is being made ; and the latter is the highest land 
in Massachusetts. Its largest towns are Pittsfield, the county- 
seat ; and Adams, in which there are many large and flourishing 
manufactories. The largest portion of the people, however, 
are agriculturists. The Boston and Albany Railroad passes 
through the centre of the county, east and west, connecting it 
with Boston and the Hudson River. There are several other 
railroads in the county, which centre at Pittsfield. 

Thete are thirty-one towns in Berkshire, but no city. The 
entire population in 1860 was 55,120, and in 1865 it was 
56,960, an increase in five years of only 1,846. The valuation 
in 1860 was $24,186,962, and in 1865 it was $27,937,444, 
being an increase in five years of $3,750,482. 

According to returns made by the selectmen in 1866 from all 
the towns in the county, it appears that the whole number of 
Dfien furnished by Berkshire for the war was five thousand 
three hundred and fifty-six, which is not far from the exact 



60 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

number required to be furnished ; but it cannot have included the 
surpluses to the credit of which they were entitled. These sur- 
pluses amount to three hundred and eighty-eight men. Every 
town in the county furnished its full quota of men upon every 
call made by the President, and each had a surplus at the end 
of the war, with the exception of Mount Washington and Tjrr- 
ingham, and these had the exact number required of them. No 
town in Berkshire, nor in the State, fell short of its contingent. 

The aggregate expenditure of all the towns in the county 
on account of the war, exclusive of the money raised and ex- 
pended for State aid to the families of volunteers, was five 
hundred and ninety thousand six hundred and ninety-seven dol- 
lars and nineteen cents ($590,697.19). The amount raised 
and expended by all the towns for State aid to the soldiers' 
families during the four years of the war, and which was reim- 
bursed by the Commonwealth, was two hundred and sixty-two 
thousand forty-nine dollars and sixty-one cents ($262,049.61), 
making a grand total of $852,746.80. 

The war records of the towns are as follows : — 

Adams. — Incorporated Oct. 15, 1778. Population in 1860, 
6,924; in 1865, 8,298. Valuation in 1860, $2,543,095; in 
1865, $3,350,551. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Alpheas Smith, Elisha Kings- 
ley, John W. Richmond ; in 1862 and 1863, Lysander Johnson, 
Luther C. Hosmer, John W. Richmond ; in 1864, Lysander 
Johnson, A. G. Plumb, William H. Wilkinson ; in 1865, John 
F. Arnold, A. G. Plumb, John W. Richmond. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was A. J. Ray ; in 1862 and 1863, 
Mark F. Adams; in 1864 and 1865, H. S. Millard.' The 
town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was W. W. Freeman; in 
1863, George A. Lapham; in 1864, C. H. Ingalls; in 1865, 
E. W. Wilkinson. 

1861. Adams is one of the prominent towns in Massachu- 
setts, and the mere ofiicial record of its doinors durins: the 
four years of the war gives no adequate conception of the spirit 
of the people. A great many public meetings were held, 
and many prominent citizens said many and did many wise and 



ADAMS. 61 

patriotic things, which do not all appear upon the official 
records of the town. 

The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to 
the war, was held on the 29th of April ; at which a committee 
of seven was appointed, with authority " to use the funds of the 
town to the amount of twenty thousand dollars, to furnish aid 
to such military companies from the town as may be called into 
the service of the United States, and to aid their families when 
not otherwise provided for." On the 22d of June the town held 
a meeting, and voted that the care of the families of volunteers 
be intrusted to the selectmen, and that they be authorized " to 
use the moneys of the town as may in their opinion be needed ; " 
with the distinct and separate understanding ** that such aid is 
in no sense a charity, but what of right belongs to families of 
volunteers." 

1862. A regular town-meeting was held on the 22d of July, 
at which it was voted " that one hundred dollars be paid from 
the town treasury to each person who shall enlist under the call 
of the Governor as one of the quota of the town." [This was 
the call of the President for 300,000 three-years volunteers.] 
The call for three hundred thousand men for nine months' ser- 
vice followed in August. When that call was received, and 
Adams was informed of the number of men which it was to 
provide to meet its contingent, on recommendation of the town 
authorities " all business in the town was suspended for three 
days, and the time was devoted to raising the quota of the 
town : S. W. Bowerman was the leading person in the work." 

1863. From the transcript of the town records which we 
have received from Adams, it does not appear that any official 
action was taken by the town during this year ; although we 
doubt not that recruiting was continued all the time, and State 
aid continued to be paid to the families of the soldiers. 

1864. At a legal town-meeting held on the 2d of July, it 
was voted to pay henceforth a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for three 
years' military service, and be mustered in and credited to the 
quota of the town ; the selectmen were also instructed to con- 
tinue recruiting after the present demand for men was filled, 



62 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

"in anticipation of a future call." There appears to have been 
no further action taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, 
during the war. 

The selectmen in 1866 reported that Adams had furnished 
nine hundred and forty-five men for the war, which we believe 
to have been an error of at least one hundred ; for, had that 
number been furnished, the surplus of men would have been at 
least one hundred more than it was. Adams filled its iiill quota 
upon every call made by the President, and at the end of the 
war had a surplus of forty-three over and above all demands. 
Twenty-nine were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred and twelve 
thousand one hundred and three dollars ($112,103.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families 
of soldiers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,338.73; in 1862, 
$9,410.17; in 1863, $11,270.23; in 1864, $14,690.38; in 
1865, $10,000.00. Total in four years, $47,759.51. 

A Ladies' Aid Society was organized very early in the war, 
of which Mrs. Miles Sanford was president, and Mrs. J. T. 
Robinson secretary. The society held weekly meetings, and 
their disbursements ^^ amounted to more than ten thousand 
dollars." 

Alford. — Incorporated Feb. 16, 1773. Population in 
1860, 542; in 1865, 461. Valuation in 1860, $320,018; 
in 1865, $340,490. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William Stoddard, Stephen M. 
Church, Horace S. Fitch; in 1862, Jonathan Baldwin, Orville 
J. Brusil, Russell Prindle ; in 1863, Ezra C. Ticknor, Jonathan 
Baldwin, Orville J. Brusil; in 1864, Ezra C. Ticknor, Henry 
W. Smith, E. K. Williams ; in 1865, William Stoddard, Elihu 
Church, Horace S. Fitch. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was Henry W. Smith; in 1862, 
William K. Calkins ; in 1863, Elihu Church ; in 1864, William 
K. Calkins ; in 1865, Giles S. Halett. The town-treasurer in 



ALFORD. 63 

1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Ezra C. Ticknor; in 1865, 

James H. Edwards. 

• 

1861. There does not appear to have been any action taken 
by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war 
during this year. 

1862. There having been a call made, July 4th, for 300,000 
men, by the President, of which Massachusetts was to furnish 
fifteen thousand, each town was assigned its quota ; therefore, 
on the 21st of July, a legal town-meeting was held, to consider 
the means which the town should take to fill its quota ; and it 
was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dol- 
lars to each volunteer (*' or seventy -five dollars to each drafted 
man, in event of a draft ") who shall enlist for three years, and 
be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. Nine 
men immediately enlisted, and each received a bounty of one 
hundred and thirty-five dollars, ten dollars having been added 
to the town bounty "by some of the loyal men of the town." 
Another meeting, properly called, was held on the 26th of 
August, at which the town "Voted, to authorize the select- 
men to pledge the credit of the town to any amount that may 
be necessary, to pay to each volunteer soldier required of this 
town, under the late call of the President for 300,000 nine- 
months men, the sum of three hundred dollars." Under this 
vote, nine men enlisted, and each received a bounty of three 
hundred dollars. November 4th, The selectmen were in- 
structed "to furnish aid to the families of volunteers from 
Alford in the United-States military service." 

1863. On the 19th of December a town-meeting was held, 
and Ezra C. Ticknor was appointed " to be an agent to procure 
volunteers to fill the quota of the town." He enlisted two men, 
to each of whom was paid a bounty of one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars. 

1864. April 7th, The town voted, "to pay one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer to the extent of its quota 
under the late call of the President for 200,000 men. Under 
this vote, no volunteer was procured ; but nine men were drafted, 
each of whom paid three hundred dollars commutation money.** 
Another legal town-meeting was held on the 2d of July. The 






64 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

selectmen were authorized " to borrow money sufficient to pay 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, not to 
exceed ten," who would enlist and be credited to the quota of 
the town. [" Under the above vote, the selectmen procured, by 
voluntary subscription, eleven hundred and twenty-five dollars; 
and they procured three volunteers, paying two of them $550 
each, and the other $500. The $1,125 with the $375 allowed 
by the town made $1,500, leaving the agent (H. W. Smith), 
who procured the men, $100 out of pocket, besides a liberal 
contribution towards the $1,125. The town, by a vote, refused 
to refund to its agent the $100 advanced by him, to save them 
from another draft."]* December 27th, The selectmen were 
authorized " to procure five volunteers, and pay to each a bounty 
of one hundred and twenty-five dollars." " Five were procured, 
and received the bounty." 

Alford furnished thirty-three men for the war, as reported 
by the selectmen in 1866. It must have furnished at least fifty- 
five. At the end of the war, after having furnished its quota 
upon every call of the President, Alford had a surplus of four 
over and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. 
The whole amount of money appropriated and expended on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was five thousand 
three hundred and forty-eight dollars ($5,348.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the to^vn to 
aid the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, 
and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861,00; in 1862, $669.47; in 1863, 
$1,316.00; in 1864, $646.68; in 1865, $302.66. Total 
amount in four years, $2,934.81. 

In regard to the work done by the ladies of Alford, we make 
the following quotation from a letter : — 

" It is impossible to tell what was done by the ladies, as no record 
was kept; but I would say that three boxes of bedding, shirts, drawers, 
bandages, and hospital supplies, sent to our wounded heroes, proved 



* The words in brackets we do not fully comprehend : we have given tliem 
as we found them. 



BECKET. 65 

well their sympathy in our struggle for national life ; and many a poor 
wounded soldier blessed the unknown giver, as he shared in those com- 
forts our ladies knew so well how to supply." 

Becket. — Incorporated June 21, 1765. Population in 
1860, 1,578 ; in 1865, 1,393. Valuation in 1860, $431,652 ; 
in 1865, $478,120. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Stephen W. Carter, 
Milton Barnes, Almeron Edwards ; in 1863 and 1864, Timothy 
F. Snow, Stephen W. Carter, James N. Cross ; in 1865, 
Stephen W. Carter, Miner Chaffee, Nathan W. Harris. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Mark 
P. Carter. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Nathan 
W. Harris; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Mark P. Carter. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 7th of May ; at which it 
was voted to appropriate two thousand dollars, for the benefit of 
volunteers who may enlist in the military service from Becket ; 
and a committee, consisting of Wright Barnes, Miner Chaffee, 
and J. Norcott, was elected to have charge of the disbursement 
of the money. On the 20th of June another town-meeting was 
held, at which the treasurer was authorized to borrow such 
sums of money as may be necessary to pay State aid to the 
families of volunteers, residing in Becket, as limited by law, and 
bounties to volunteers who may enlist from this town. 

1862. A properly warned town-meeting was held on the 
26th of June, at which it was voted to .luthorize the town- 
treasurer to borrow money for the payment of State aid to the 
soldiers* families. Another meeting was held on the 24th of 
July, at which the treasurer was directed to borrow three thou- 
sand dollars, " to make up the amount paid by subscription to 
twenty volunteers, for three years' service, who had enlisted 
and been credited to the quota of the town." The town also 
voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer 
who should enlist to the credit of the town. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in 
its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year, 

5 



66 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

although bounties were continued to be paid, and also State 
aid to the families of volunteers. 

1864. On the 8th of July a town-meeting was held, at 
which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars to each volunteer for three years* service, who 
should enlist and be credited to the town, " under the present 
call of the President, or under any future call he may make." 
On the 6th of December the selectmen were directed to procure 
as many volunteers '* as they may deem necessary," and on the 
27th the treasurer was authorized to borrow " whatever amount 
of money should be necessary to fill the contingent of the 
town." This policy appears to have been continued until the 
end of the war. 

The selectmen in 1866 report that the towij furnished one 
hundred and two men for the war ; but as Becket furnished its 
full quota on every demand made by the President for men, 
and at the end of the war had a surplus of seven over and 
above all demands, it must have furnished at least one hundred 
and fifty men. One was a commissioned officer. The whole 
amount of money appropriated by the town, and expended on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was sixteen thousand 
three hundred and eighty-seven dollars ($16,387.00). This 
includes what was raised by private subscription, and allowed 
for commutation. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war, for State aid to soldiers' 
families, and afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows : In 1861, $242.88 ; in 1862, $2,297.84 ; in 1863, 
13,044.57; in 1864, $2,721.34; in 1865,11,300.00. Total 
amount in four years, $10,606.63. 

Cheshire. — Incorporated March 14, 1793. Population in 
1860, 1,533; in 1865, 1,650. Valuation in 1860, $646,- 
771; in 1865, $675,997. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were 
George W. Fisher, John Burt, Orin Martin. 

The town-clerk during the same years was E. F. Nickerson, 



GHESHIBE. 67 

and the town-treasurer during the same period was R. M. 
Cole. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 18th of May ; at which 
it was voted to authorize the selectmen to ** borrow or raise 
money " sufficient to carry out the provisions of the recent act 
of the Legislature in relation to the payment of State aid to the 
fBmilies of volunteers. 

1862. On the 28th of July a special meeting was held, to 
consider the best means to fill the quota of the town under the 
late call of the President for three hundred thousand volunteers 
for three years' service. The selectmen were authorized to pay 
each volunteer who enlists and is credited to Cheshire a bounty 
of one hundred dollars. September 10th, By vote of the town 
the selectmen were directed .to pay the same bounty to volun- 
teers for nine months' service, who enlist and are credited to the 
quota of the town. 

1863. At the annual meeting held on the 2d of March, the 
town voted to place the whole matter of paying State aid to 
soldiers' families with the selectmen, who were to act according 
to their discretion ; and on the 26th of September they were 
directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the 
same as to volunteers. 

1864. On the 5th of April a town-meeting was held, at 
which the selectmen were authorized to borrow money, and to 
pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each 
volunteer who shall enlist for three years' military service, and 
be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town ; and at 
another meeting, held on the 16th of December, they were 
directed to continue recruiting and the payment of bounties, " to 
fill the anticipated quota of the town " under another call of the 
President for volunteers; and to borrow, not exceeding ten 
thousand dollars. 

By the return made by the selectmen in 1866, Cheshire 
claims to have furnished one hundred and fourteen men for the 
war. The real number furnished was doubtless about one hun- 
dred and fifty, as at the end of the war Cheshire had a surplus 
of sixteen, after having filled its quota upon every call made by 



i 



68 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLIOK. 

the President for men. Three were commissioned officers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town 
on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifteen thou- 
sand seven hundred and fifteen dollars ($15,715.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid 
to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards refunded 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $260.40 ; in 
1862, $2,132.23; in 1863, $3,314.03; in 1864, $1,774.41; 
in 1865, $1,000. Total amount in four years, 8,220.77. 

The ladies of Cheshire " furnished a large amount of material 
for the soldiers, which was forwarded by them to the army." 

Clarksburg. — Incorporated March 2, 1798. Population 
in 1860, 420; in 1865, 530. Valuation in 1860, $107,505; 
in 1865, $133,234. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Dennis Thayer, James Mixer, 
Hiram Brown ; in 1862, Waterman Brown, John Page, Joseph 
Miner; in 1863, Waterman Brown, Joseph Miner, Hiram 
Brown ; in 1864, Joseph D. Clark, Ezra W. Gleason, Joseph 
Miner, Jr. ; in 1865, Richard Shattuck, Laban Clark, Henry 
Worthy. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Waterman 
Brown ; in 1864, William W. Gallup ; in 1865, Charles W. 
Briggs. The town- treasurer in 1861 was Joseph Clark ; in 
1862 and 1863, Joseph B. Wheeler; in 1864, Waterman 
Brown; in 1865, Eleazer Ketchum. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this 
year. 

1862. The first meeting to act upon war matters was held 
on the 22d of July ; at which five hundred dollars were appro- 
priated to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of five 
men who would enlist in the military service for three years, to 
fill the quota of the town. August 18th, Voted, to pay a 
bounty of fifty dollars to each volunteer who enlists for nine 
months and is credited to the town ; and to pay " to any man 
five dollars who procures a volunteer that is accepted." 



DALTON. 69 

1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the 
town during this year to keep its quota filled. 

1864. June 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for 
three years' military service, and be accepted and credited to the 
town. This bounty was continued to be paid until the end of 
the war. 

Clarksburg furnished forty-two men for the war, which was 
a surplus of two over and above all demands. None were com- 
missioned oflScers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid to soldiers' families, was six thousand three hundred 
and thirty-three dollars and seventy-three cents ($6,333.73). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during the four years of the war, 
and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $153.48; in 1862, $953.35; in 
1863, $1,361.48; in 1864, $1,102.30; in 1865, $400.00. 
Total amount, $3,970.61. 

Dalton. — Incorporated March 2, 1798. Population in 
1860, 1,243 ; in 1865, 1,137. Valuation in 1860, $733,646 ; 
in 1865, $988,160. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Charles O. Brown, Henry A. 
Hale, David Smith; in 1862, David C. Smith, Henry A. 
Hale, Henry A. Burton ; in 1863 and 1864, David C. Smith, 
Henry A. Burton, William K. Cleveland; in 1865, David C. 
Smith, Austin S. Pease, Wells A. Laflin. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Henry 
Ferre; in 1865, H. M. Parker. The town-treasurer in 1861, 
1862, 1863, and 1864, was Burr Chamberlain ; in 1865, Wil- 
liam H. Wharficld. 

Whatever was done by the citizens of Dalton during the 
years 1861 and 1862 in relation to the war was done without 
the action of the town in its corporate character, as there is 
no entry upon the town records during those years having 
relation to the war. 

1863. At a regular legal town-meeting held on the 9th of 



70 MASSA0HUSETT8 IN THE REBELLION. 

March, the town voted to raise one thousand dollars ^towards 
paying part of the expense for volunteers." It was also — 

Voted^ That the town approve of the course pursued by our select- 
men last year, in offering bounties for volunteers for the military ser- 
vice of the United States, so as to fill up the quotas of this town, as 
made out by our State authorities, and in answer to each of the calls 
made by the President for volunteers in July and August, 1862. 

VotecL, That the town assume the responsibilities of the selectmen 
for the expenses incurred by them in borrowing money to pay the 
aforesaid bounties; provided, the bounties paid to each volunteer 
actually accepted and sworn into service does not exceed one hundred 
dollars. 

Voted, That the present board of selectmen be instructed to renew, 
with interest, the notes given by the past board of selectmen for such 
borrowed money, or otherwise take such action as will secure the de- 
sired result 

On the 30th of September another town-meeting was held, 
at which the selectmen were authorized ^ to borrow such sums 
of money as may be necessary to be paid to the Treasurer of 
the Commonwealth, under an act to provide for the reimburse- 
ment of bounties paid to volunteers." 

1864. A town-meeting was held on the 5th of July, at 
which it was voted " to raise by tax and pay the sum of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars as a bounty to each volunteer 
who shall enlist from the town of Dalton for the term of three 
years, under the anticipated call of the President. It was 
also — 

Resolved, That each citizen of Dalton, liable to do military duty 
under the late enrolment, who will subscribe and pay to the chairman 
of the selectmen the sum of forty dollars as a fund to procure volun- 
teers or substitutes, shall, if drafted, be entitled to enough money to 
provide a substitute, in case a sufficient sum be raised for each man 
called for ; otherwise, shall receive pro rata from the fund. 

Resolved, That the selectmen be a committee, with authority to 
appoint a sub-committee, who shall call on every citizen tax-payer, with 
a proper subscription paper pledging each subscriber to pay his pro- 
portion ; provided, three-fifths of the taxable property of the town be 
represented by the subscribers, the proportion to be made from the 



EGREMOKT. 71 

assessors' valuation of a certain sum, not to exceed eight hundred dol- 
lars to each man called for, as part of the fund for procuring volunteers 
or substitutes to fill the quota of the town under the anticipated call 
of the President 

• 

Another meeting was held on the 28th of July, when David 
C. Smith and Wells Laflin were appointed a committee " to go 
to Springfield, and try to get the names from the list." 

The selectmen in their return in 1866 claim that Dalton 
furnished eighty-one men for the war ; but as the town filled its 
quota on every call of the President for men, and had a surplus 
of seven at the end of the war, over and above all demands, it 
probably furnished about one hundred and twenty-five men, 
including those who paid commutation-money. One was a 
commissioned oflScer. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town on account of the war, ex- 
clusive of State aid, was three thousand seven hundred and 
sixty-two dollars and eighty-one cents ($3,762'81). This does 
not include the money raised by subscription, of which there 
must have been at least ten thousand dollars. 

The amount raised and expended by the town during the four 
years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and after- 
wards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, 00; in 1862, $416.60; in 1863, $998.40; in 1864, 
$1,018.81 ; in 1865, $891.66. Total in four years, $3,325.47. 

Egremont. — Incorporated Feb. 13, 1760. Population in 
1860, 1,079; in 1865,928. Valuation in 1860, $452,030 ; 
in 1865, $587,619. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Milo Talmadge, Edmund 
Crippen, Milan Brown ; in 1862, Benjamin Baldwin, Calvin 
Benjamin, Samuel B. Goodale; in 1863, Samuel B. Goodale, 
George C. Benjamin, Seymour B. Dewey ; in 1864 and 1865, 
Seymour B, Dewey, James H. Rowley, Joshua R. Layton, Jr. 

The town-clerk and town- treasurer during all of these years 
was Joseph A. Benjamin. 

1861. The first meeting, to act upon matters relating to 
the war, was held on the 30th of May ; at which it was voted to 
instruct the treasurer to borrow one thousand dollars for aid and 



72 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

assistance to the families of the inhabitants of the town who 
had entered, or might afterwards enter, the military service of 
the United States to fiojht ao^ainst the Rebellion. 

1862. July 21st, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer who should enlist for three years, and be mustered into the 
military service, and be credited to the quota of Egremont. To 
which was added whatever bounty allowed by the Government. 
The treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay said 
bounty. Nine persons immediately enlisted. Another meeting 
was held on the 28th of August, at which it was voted to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' 
service, to fill the quota of the town. Seventeen men immedi- 
ately stepped forward in the meeting, and signed the enlistment- 
roll. An adjourned meeting was held on the 16th of Septem- 
ber, when six more men signed the enlistment-rolls. During 
these two meetings, many gifts and premiums were oflfered by 
citizens to encourage recruiting, such as watches, money, and 
other valuables, "for the next volunteer." October 13th, It 
was resolved, "that the town indemnify, and save harmless, the 
selectmen and town-treasurer from all suits, actions, claims, 
costs, charges, and expenses arising, or which may arise, against 
each or all of them, by reason of any thing done by them in 
the discharge of their duties as oflScers of said town in aiding 
to subdue the Rebellion." This resolution was unanimously 
adopted, and eight more names were added to the enrolment- 
list. 

During the years 1864 and 1865, several meetings were held, 
to devise ways and means by which to recruit volunteers, pay 
bounties, and keep the quota of the town filled. The select- 
men were given full power to recruit, and the treasurer was 
authorized to borrow whatever money was required to pay 
bounties and State aid to the soldiers' families. 

Egremont reported in 1866 to have furnished ninety-three 
men for the war ; most probably about one hundred and thirty, 
as it had a surplus of six over and above all demands at the 
end of the war. Three were commissioned oflScers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 



FLORIDA. 73 

account of the war, exclusive of State aid to the families of 
volunteers, was twelve thousand two hundred and ninety-four 
dollars ($12,294). 

The amount of money raised and expended by Egremont for 
State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of 
the war, and which was reimbursed to the town by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $55.14; in 1862, 
$648.56; in 1863, $1,428; in 1864, $1,192; in 1865, $800. 
Total, amount, $4,124.70. 

Florida. — Incorporated June 15, 1805. Population in 
1860, 645 ; in 1865, 1,173.* Valuation in 1860, $119,316; 
in 1865, $152,523. 

The selectmen in 1861 were S. A. Kemp, William White, 
E. W. Thatcher; in 1862, S. A. Kemp, E. W. Thatcher, 
E. M. Vincent; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, S. A. Kemp, 
Sylvanus Clark, H. W. Burnett. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was W. P. 
Brown. The town-treasurer during the same period was 
Nathan White. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in 
its corporate capacity, on matters relating to the war during 
this year. 

1862. July 21st, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bountv of one hundred dollars to each volunteer to the number 
of six who should enlist for three years, and be mustered in 
and credited to the quota of the town. They were also 
authorized to borrow six hundred dollars to pay the same. 
October 13th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to 
volunteers for nine months' service. 

1863. January 26th, The selectmen were directed to pro- 
cure substitutes to complete the town's quota of nine-months 
men. 

1864. January 18th, The bounty to recruits for three years' 
service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars ; and 
the selectmen were directed to recruit volunteers to fill the 

* This increase of population was chiefly caused by the recommencement of 
work on the Hoosac Tunnel. 



74 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

quota of the town, and to borrow money for that purpose. 
They were also instructed " to open a recruiting office, and to 
advertise the same." 

1865. March 6th, The selectmen were authorized to keep 
on recruiting, and to pay the same bounty, ''to fill all quotas 
of the town on any future call of the President for volun- 
teers." 

We have been unable to ascertain the exact number of men 
which Florida furnished for the war, but probably it was about 
seventy-five. We know, however, that at the end of the war 
the town had completed, in full, all demands made upon it for 
men, and had a surplus of five over and above these demands. 
None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was four thousand nine hundred and 
eighty dollars ($4,980). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of 
the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $40 ; in 1862, $402.60 ; 
in 1863, $975; in 1864, $600.27; in 1865, $300.51. Total 
amount, $2,328.38. 

Great Barrington. — Incorporated June 30, 1761. Popu- 
lation in 1860, 3,871 ; in 1865, 3,920. Valuation in 1860, 
$1,843,798; in 1865, $2,177,071. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Walter W. HoUens- 
beck, Henry Foote, John Burgherst; in 1863, John M. Seeley, 
George Church, B. F. Gilmore ; in 1864 and 1865, John M. 
Seeley, George Church, Charles J. Taylor. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war, and for many 
years previous thereto, was Isaac Seeley. The town-treasurer 
in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, was Egbert Hollister. 

1861. On the 22d of April, three days after the Sixth Mas- 
sachusetts Kegiment had been attacked in Baltimore, and the 
first blood had been shed in the Bebellion, a call for a public 
meeting was issued, inviting " the inhabitants of Great Barring- 
ton, and the adjoining towns, to attend a public meeting at the 



GREAT BARRINGTON. 75 

town-hall, on the 24th, at 3 o'clock, p.m., for the purpose of 
adopting prompt measures to aid the Government of the United 
States in sustaining the Constitution, executing the laws, and 
suppressing the traitorous rebellion now existing in the South- 
em States." The meeting was largely attended by ladies and 
gentlemen of Great Barrington, " and by a few persons from 
the adjoining towns." Joseph Tucker — who soon afterwards 
went out first lieutenant in the Forty-ninth Kegiment Nine- 
months Volunteers, and who lost a leg in the service, and is now 
Lieutenant-Governor of the Commonwealth — was chosen tempo- 
rary chairman. The meeting was opened with prayer by Rev. 
Horace Winslow. David Leavitt was made permanent chair- 
man, and was assisted by several vice-presidents and secretaries. 
Hon. Increase Sumner presented and read a preamble and reso- 
lutions, which were unanimously adopted. The preamble set 
forth the fact of the Kebellion, " one of the results of which has 
been the shedding of Massachusetts blood, thereby consecrating 
the 19th of April, 1861, with the immortal memories of April 
19th, 1775." The first resolution sets forth: Ist, That the 
crisis demands the exertion of every American patriot to arrest 
the progress of treason and rebellion. 2d, We pledge, " in the 
spirit of loyalty, our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor, 
in maintaining the authority of the Government ; " " that we go 
for upholding and sustaining the flag of our Union for ever, and 
will protect it against insults and indignities from foes with- 
out, and from traitors within." The third urges the organiza- 
tion of one or more military companies in Great Barrington, 
for active and immediate service, and that money be raised to 
aid the volunteers and their families. The fourth we copy 
entire : — 

Resolved^ That, as citizens of this great American CoDfederacy, 
participating in the commou history and glories of the American 
Revolution, our chief desire is peace, the general welfare, and the 
blessiDgs of liberty, in all the States, and among all the kindred and 
races within that Confederacy ; and that harmony and good fellowship, 
without more bloodshed, may be speedily restored. But if it be other- 
wise ordered, and traitors and rebels persist in their deeds of treason 
and rebellion, then, trusting in the favor and strength of Almighty 



76 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Grod, who sustained our Fathers in their sufferings and battles for 
freedom, we will contribute all our might to conquer and punish the 
offenders. 

A committee of thirteen was appointed, to carry out 
" promptly and energetically ^ the purpose of the third resolu- 
tion. This committee presented, " forthwith," an enlistment 
paper ; and several young men immediately signed it, " amidst 
great applause." A subscription paper was also drawn up, and 
presented ; " and, in a few minutes, forty-seven hundred dollars 
were subscribed, all of which, with the exception of thirty 
dollars, by citizens of Great Barrington." 

The first legal town-meeting was held on the 8th of June, at 
which liberal measures were adopted to provide for the payment 
of State aid to the families of the volunteers, in accordance 
with the act of the Legislature passed at the late extra session ; 
and the treasurer of the town was authorized to borrow two 
thousand dollars, " to serve as a fund for that purpose." 

1862. A call having been made by the President for an 
additional three hundred thousand men July 4th, a legal town- 
meeting was held on the 1 9th of July ; at which it was voted 
"that it is our bounden duty, now, henceforth, and for ever, to 
give our obedient, ready, and earnest response to the call ; and 
we do respond accordingly." The selectmen were authorized 
to recruit volunteers, and to pay each a bounty of one hundred 
dollars who enlists for three years, and shall be mustered in and 
credited to the quota of the town. David Leavitt, Edwin 
Hurlbert, and Mark Humphrey were chosen to assist the select- 
men in recruiting ; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow 
forty-eight hundred dollars, to meet the expense. Another 
meeting was held on the 28th of August, at which it was voted 
to pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months' service. 
The treasurer was again directed to borrow money. 

1863. On the 22d of August a town-meeting was held, at 
which it was voted to pay State aid to the families of men 
who may be drafted. On the 8th of December, Dr. David 
Campbell was appointed recruiting agent for the town, receiv- 
ing: a vote of thanks for his former services, and "for the 
fidelity and patriotism he has exhibited, ever since the com- 



HANCOCK. 77 

mencement of the war, In procuring volunteers for the ser- 



• 9> 

Vice. 



1864. On the 18th of June a town-meeting was held, at 
which it was voted to fix the bounty to each volunteer, for three 
years' service, at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. Several 
other meetings were held during the year, to encourage enlist- 
ments, at which nothing of especial interest was done. 

Great Barrington was reported by the selectmen in 1866 as 
having furnished four hundred and thirty men for the war, 
which is about the number the town furnished, and which was a 
surplus of eight over and above all demands made upon it 
during the war. Seventeen were commissioned oflScers. The 
total amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty- 
five thousand six hundred and ninety-one dollars and eighty- 
two cents ($25,691.82). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid 
to the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards reim- 
bursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$651.48; in 1862, $3,854.97 ; in 1863, $6,422.58 ; in 1864, 
$5,371.26; in 1865, $3,200. Total amount in four years, 
$19,500.29. 

The ladies of Great Barrington formed a Soldiers' Aid 
Society on the 2d of May, 1861, which met once a week, to do 
soldiers' work, until the close of the war. We have not been 
able to procure a detailed account of their labors, but this fact 
may be taken as an illustration of their entire course. Immedi- 
ately after the battle of the Wilderness, in May, 1864, they 
raised twenty-two hundred and eighty-two dollars for the 
benefit of the sick and wounded. 

Hancock. — Incorporated July 2, 1776. Population in 
1860, 816; in 1865, 967. Valuation in 1860, $494,484; in 
1865, $490,299. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Gardner Eldridge, H. H. 
Whitman, C. P. Lapham ; in 1862, H. H. Whitman, D. H. 
Gardner, J. C. Gorton; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, H. H. 
Whitman, B. L. Mason, James R. Whitman. 



78 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Charles 
B. Wells. The town-treasurer during the years 1861, 1862, 
and 1863, was Thomas E. Hadsell; in 1864, M. L. White; 
in 1865, Silas G. Danley. 

1862. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 25th of July ; at which, on 
motion of Calvin P. Lapham, seconded by Rufus L. Mason, it 
was — 

Resolved^ That the selectmen be authorized to borrow, on the credit 
of the town, nine hundred dollars, to pay nine volunteer soldiers one 
hundred dollars each, as a bounty ; that being the number of volunteers 
called for by the State authorities. 

This bounty was to be paid when the men were mustered in 
and credited. The town also authorized the selectmen to draw 
from the treasury money to pay State aid to the soldiers' 
families, as provided by law. September 3d, The selectmen 
were authorized to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each 
volunteer for nine months' service, and to borrow money for that 
purpose. 

1863. March 2d, The acts of the selectmen, in borrowing 
money to pay aid to the soldiers' families, were approved. 

1864. August 16th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years' mili- 
tary service, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the 
town ; and the same amount ^ to any person who shall, before a 
draft takes place, procure a substitute, and who shall be credited 
to the town." The selectmen were also authorized to employ 
an agent to recruit volunteers. This system was continued 
until the end of the war. 

Hancock furnished seventy men for the war, which was a 
surplus of five over and above all demands. One was a com- 
missioned oflScer. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was nine thousand four hundred and fifty-five dollars 
($9,455). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 



HINSDALE. 79 

soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $244; in 
1863, $327.79; in 1864, $293:57; in 1865, $275. Total 
amount, $1,140.41. 

The ladies of Hancock were busy during the whole of the 
war ^Mn devising means, and sending to the soldiers articles for 
their comfort, in the field, hospital, or wherever they could be 
found." 

Hinsdale. — Incorporated June 21, 1804. Population in 
1860, 1,511 ; in 1865, 1,517. Valuation in 1860, $557,661 ; 
in 1865, $801,775. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were William H. Carson, 
Clark Prince, Ezra B. Tracy ; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Wil- 
liam H. Carson, Lysander M. Francis, Ezra B. Tracy. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was John 
Cady ; the town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was 
Henry A. Deming; in 1865, Ameroy E. Taylor. 

1861. We regret that the returns we have received from 
Hinsdale are not so full and complete as we wish they might 
have been. We find, however, that the first legal town-meeting, 
to act upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 10th 
of May, at which the town appropriated two thousand dollars, 
** to be used by the selectmen as might be required by the Gov- 
ernment of the United States, for war purposes." 

1862. A legal town-meeting was held on the 9th of October, 
at which four thousand one hundred and fifty dollars were 
appropriated for the payment of bounties to volunteers, — " the 
selectmen having expended that amount in furnishing men, in 
obedience to the call of the President of the United States." 

1863. At a town-meeting held on the 6th of April, thirteen 
hundred dollars were appropriated " for the payment of ex- 
penses of recruiting volunteers." 

1864. On the 4th of April the town voted one thousand 
two hundred and eighty-five dollars for the same purpose. 

1865. April 29th, Four thousand two hundred and eighty- 
nine dollars and three cents were appropriated to reimburse 
citizens ^* who had subscribed and paid money for raising volun- 
teers." 



80 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The selectmen In 1866 reported that Hinsdale had furnished 
eighty-five men for the war, and the town-clerk in 1870 
reports that Hinsdale furnished but seventy-three men, when 
the fact is, that Hinsdale furnished at least one hundred and 
fifty men; for it furnished its full quota on every call of the 
President for men, and at the end of the war had a surplus of 
fifteen over and above all demands. None were commissioned 
officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was nineteen thousand and ninety-nine dollars and eighty- 
two cents ($19,099.82). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 
enlisted men, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $103.14 ; in 1862, 
$860.64 ; in 1863, $1,682 ; in 1864, $2,000 ; in 1865, $1,400. 
Total amount in four years, $6,045.78. 

The ladies of Hinsdale contributed in garments and money 
for the soldiers, independent of their own labor, to the value of 
three hundred and fifty dollars. 

Lanesborough. — Incorporated June 21, 1765. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 1,308; in 1865, 1,292. Valuation in 1860, 
$641,549; in 1865, $661,048. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Stephen T. Whipple, William 
A. Talcott, Ezra H. Sherman ; in 1862 and 1863, Stephen T. 
Whipple, Ezra H. Sherman, Luther H. Washburn ; in 1864, 
Stephen T. Whipple, Jared D. Northale, William H. Meade. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was William 
A. Fuller. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was 
Jedediah W. Newton; in 1864, William A. Fuller; in 1865, 
Charles B. Whitney. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 10th of December ; at 
which the selectmen were authorized to expend such sums from 
the treasury as they may deem necessary for the relief of the 
families of volunteers, who are in the military service, and 
belong to Lanesborough, as the law in relation thereto pro- 
vides. 



LEE. 81 

1862. August 28, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who would 
enlist in the military service, either for three years or for nine 
months, and be credited to the quota of the town. 

1863. No meeting of the town, in its corporate capacity, 
appears to have been held during this year, at which votes were 
passed having relation to the war. 

1864. April 11th, The town voted to pay a bounty of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who would 
enlist in the military service of the country for three years, and 
be credited to the quota of Lanesborough ; and the treasurer was 
authorized to borrow whatever sums of money were necessary 
to pay the same. This was continued until the end of the 
war. 

The selectmen, in 1866, reported that Lanesborough fur- 
nished one hundred and thirty men for the war, which was 
about its proportion, and which was a surplus of seven over 
and above all demands. None were commissioned officers. 
The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of that raised for State 
aid, was twelve thousand nine hundred and forty-seven dollars 
and ninety-one cents ($12,947.91). A considerable amount 
was also raised by private means, which is not included in the 
foregoing. 

The money raised and appropriated by the town for State aid 
to the families of soldiers during the four years of the war, and 
afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $50.40 ; in 1862, $629.08 ; in 1863, $1,292.00 ; in 1864, 
$1,104.00; in 1865, $780.17. Total amount, $3,856.45. 

Lee. — Incorporated Oct. 21, 1777. Population in 1860, 
4,420; in 1865, 4,034. Valuation in 1860, $1,731,778; in 
1865, $1,682,411. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were William G. Merrill, 

Edwin Morgan, Sylvester S. May ; in 1863, Sylvester S. May, 

John Stallman, George K. Sturges ; in 1864, Sylvester S. 

May, William G. Merrill, James Bullard; in 1865, James 

Bullard, William G. Merrill, Alonzo Bradley. 

6 



82 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Thomas A. Omar ; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, Jonathan F. Cook. The town-treasurer 
in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Otis S. Lyman; in 1864 and 
1865, Joseph C. Chaffee. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider war matters, 
was held May 4th, which was opened with prayer by Rev. 
Nahum Gale, D.D. Voted, that a military company of at 
least sixty-four men be enrolled " to hold themselves in readi- 
ness for a call into active service." On motion of Marshall 
Wilcox, Esq., it was — 

Resolved, That the inhabitants of Lee deem it important that the 
Grovernment of the United States should have the hearty and earnest 
encouragement and active assistance of every loyal citizen in suppress- 
ing the treasonable rebellion which aims at the overthrow of our laws 
and the Constitution of the land ; and that as citizens of Lee, actuated 
by a love of our country and of universal liberty, we are ready to 
share in the common effort of sustaining our Government ; and, as a 
town, we assure those of our citizens who shall enter into the service 
of the Government as volunteer soldiers, that their families dependent 
upon them shall be well and honorably provided for and sustained 
during their entire absence. 

The resolution was unanimously adopted, and the selectmen 
were authorized to borrow three thousand dollars. Isaac C. 
Ives, William Taylor, Harrison Garfield, and John Branning 
were joined with the selectmen in the expenditure of the money. 
The selectmen were also authorized to procure a suitable room 
for drilling purposes. 

1862. April 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money for the payment of aid to the families of volunteers. 
July 2l8t, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to 
each volunteer for three years' service who has enlisted, or who 
may enlist, to the number of thirty-seven, — said bounty to be 
paid when properly mustered in and credited ; and the select- 
men were authorized to borrow thirty-seven hundred dollars 
to pay the same. August 28th, It was voted to pay the same 
amount of bounty to volunteers for nine months' service, to be 
paid by notes running for nine months with interest ; but if any 
volunteer ^Hhus raised be dishonorably discharged, said note 



LEE. 83 

to be void." October 11th, It having been found that the 
notes thus given could not be negotiated, and were therefore 
unsuited for the purpose, the town voted to pay the bounty in 
money. 

1863. July 25th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money to pay State aid to the families of drafted men. Sep- 
tember 26th, Voted, to raise seven thousand two hundred and 
forty-seven dollars and fifty-two cents to settle bounty money, 
as provided in section 9th of chapter 218 of the Acts- of 1863. 

1864. April 9th, The bounty for volunteers for three years' 
service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, which 
was the amount paid to each uutil the end of the war. Several 
meetings were held during the year to appropriate money for 
State aid and recruiting purposes, and power was given to the 
selectmen to recruit men, borrow money, and pay bounties. 

The town of Lee, according to the return made by the select- 
men in 1866, furnished two hundred and ninety-five men for 
the war ; but as the town furnished its full quota of men upon 
every call of the President, and had a surplus of fifteen at the 
end of the war, over and above all demands, it is clear that the 
number furnished must have been at least four hundred, includ- 
ing those who paid commutation-money. Fifteen were com- 
missioned oflScers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was twenty-one thousand six hundred and fifty-four 
dollars and fifty-six cents ($21,654.56). This is exclusive 
of the money contributed by citizens to encourage recruiting, 
which was quite large in amount. 

The sum raised and expended by the town during the four 
years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers , and 
which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, $1,367.71; in 1862, $4,905.59; in 
1863, $6,253.61; in 1864, $5,149.55; in 1865, $3,100.00. 
Total amount in four years, $20,776.46. 

In regard to the work done by the ladies of Lee, William 
J. Bartlett, Esq., writes, "that $1,005.17 in cash was sent to 
the Christian Commission during 1863 and 1864, of which 
the ladies of Lee contributed $470.10; they also sent four 




84 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

boxes of comfortable things to the soldiers, valued at $175." 
A lady informs us that, "besides the four boxes sent by 
the ladies of Lee to the Christian Commission, several other 
boxes, far more valuable, were sent by them to the hospitals, 
of which no record has been preserved. I remember one worth 
one hundred dollars, sent to Miss Dix at Washington. As to 
the value and destination of the other boxes, or their number, 
I cannot speak definitely." 

Lenox. — Incorporated Feb. 26, 1767. Population in 
1860, 1,711 ; in 1865, 1,667. Valuation in 1860, $821,416; 
in 1865, $827,539. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Phineas Cone, Luther Sears, 
Luther S. Butler ; in 1862, Henry W. Taft, Luther S. Butler, 
William Deming, Jr. ; in 1863, William Deming, Jr., Luther 
S. Butler, Chauncey E. Dewey ; in 1864, William Deming, 
Jr., Phineas Cone, Chauncey E. Dewey; in 1865, Albert G. 
Belden, Chauncey E. Dewey, Luther S. Butler. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was William S. Tucker; 
in 1863, WUlis C. Cook ; in 1864 and 1865, David E. Bangs. 
The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was George J. Tucker; 
in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Josiah C. Arnold. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 6th of May ; at which the 
following preamble and resolutions were read, and unanimously 
adopted : — 

Whereas, The rebellion, which has been for many months in progress 
in the Southern portion of the country, has, through the forbearance 
of the Government, and in the hope of a peaceful solution of existing 
difficulties, been allowed to assume formidable and dangerous propor- 
tions, and its leaders, aiming at nothing less than the subversion of the 
Grovernment, have inaugurated an offensive war; And whereas, it is 
the duty of all citizens in this time of peril to stand together for the 
support of the Constitution and the Union, and to be ready for any 
sacrifice and any duty which the defence and preservation of our free 
institutions may require; And whereas, the citizens of the town of 
Lenox, in the preparation for and conflict of the American Revo- 
lution, manifested a zeal and devotion worthy of emulation by their 
sons and successors, therefore — 



LENOX. 85 

Resolved, That the sum of one thousand dollars be, and it hereby is, 
appropriated for the purpose of disciplining the militia of the town, 
fiirnishing them with arms and equipments, and for the aid and equip- 
ment of such inhabitants of the town as shall engage in actual service 
in the militia of the Commonwealth, or of the United States. 

Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed, who shall be au- 
thorized to expend a sum of one thousand dollars, or any part thereof 
as they shall deem advisable ; and that they be authorized to expend 
thereof a sum not exceeding fise hundred dollars, in furnishing arms, 
equipments, and military instruction to the militia of the town, under 
such rules and regulations as they may prescribe. 

Resolved, That the town will pay to any inhabitant thereof, being 
a non-commissioned officer or private, who shall voluntarily engage in 
the service of the United States, the sum of five dollars per month 
in addition to the pay allowed by the Government, upon the produc- 
tion of a certificate from the aforesaid committee that he is an inhabit- 
ant, and of his said service, payable at such time as the committee shall 
deem proper. 

It was then voted that Henry W. Taft, Albert Langdon, 
William Deming, Jr., William D. Sedgwick, and Luther S. 
Butler " be the aforesaid committee." An adjourned meeting 
was held on the 13th of May, at which the first resolution was 
amended *'by inserting $2,000 instead of $1,000." 

1862. At a legal meeting held on the 3d of March, five 
hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid 
to the families of soldiers. On the 2 2d of July the town voted 
to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of eighteen 
men who would volunteer for three years in the military service 
to fill the quota of the town, the bounty to be paid when mus- 
tered in and credited ; and Albert Langdon, James H. Collins, 
David E. Bangs, and Chauncey Sears were appointed to assist 
the selectmen in recruiting the volunteers. At a meeting held 
on the 25th of August, it was voted to pay the same amount of 
bounty to volunteers enlisting to fill the quota of the town on 
the call for ni^e-months men. The selectmen were authorized 
to borrow, not exceeding thirty-five hundred dollars, for the 
payment of bounties and for State aid. 

1863. On " the first Monday in April " the town appropri- 
ated fifteen hundred dollars for State aid to soldiers' families. 



86 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

On the 5th of October, several of the citizens having been 
drafted, and each having paid three hundred dollars commuta- 
tion-money, the town voted " that it is right and just that this 
burden should be equally and ratably divided among the in- 
habitants of the town, and not be permitted to fall upon a 
few individuals, some of whom are ill able to bear it." It was 
then voted that three hundred dollars be paid to each of the 
drafted men who had paid commutation to that amount. 

1864. On the 11th of April twelve hundred dollars were 
appropriated for the payment of State aid. On the 31st of 
May the selectmen were authorized to borrow money, and to 
pay to each person who furnishes a substitute, and has him 
credited to the quota of Lenox, the sum of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars. June 16th, The selectmen were authorized 
to borrow money to reimburse citizens for money contributed 
by them to encourage enlistments to fill the quotas of the town 
under the last two calls of the President for men. December 
17th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow three thousand 
dollars to pay bounties. 

1865. Two meetings were held April 3d and 15th, at which 
thirty-eight hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment 
of State aid to soldiers' families. June 20th, The selectmen 
were authorized to raise money, and pay each citizen the money 
which he had contributed to pay bounties and encourage recruit- 
ing during the war. 

The selectmen in 1866 reported that Lenox furnished one 
hundred and sixty men for the war, which, exclusive of those 
who paid commutation, is about the correct number. Lenox 
at the end of the war had a surplus of sixteen, over and above 
all demands. Seven were commissioned oflScers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fourteen thou- 
sand six hundred and forty-two dollars and fifty-seven cents 
($14,642.57). 

The amount raised and expended during the four years of 
the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which was 
afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, 00 ; in 1862, $982.89 ; in 1863, $2,516.55 ; in 1864, 



MONTEREY. 87 

$2,936.71 ; in 1865, $2,200.00. Total amount in four years, 
$8,636.15. 

" The ladies of Lenox organized a Soldiers' Aid Society in 

1861, and were constantly sending on boxes of clothing and 
other articles until the close oft the war." 

Monterey. — Incorporated April 12, 1847. Population in 
1860, 758; in 1865, 737. Valuation in 1860, $306,184; in 
1865, $292,117. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Newton Brewer, 
Merrick D. Mansir, Daniel A. Garfield ; in 1863, Lemuel J. 
Townsend, Beuben R. Brewer, Orin H. Munson ; in 1864, 
Albert Eewey, Orin H. Munson, Amos E. Langdon ; in 1865, 
Orin H. Munson, Norman S. Sears, Virgil S. Abbott. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was A. J. 
Fargo. The town-treasurer in 1861 was W. C. Langdon ; in 

1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, John G. Mansir. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town 
concerning the war during this year. 

1862. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 31st of July ; at which the 
selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
ten dollars to each volunteer to the number of ten, who would 
enlist for three years and be credited to fill the quota of the 
town. They were to recruit the men " in such manner as they 
might select," and to pledge the credit of the town for the 
amount of money they might require. Mr. John D. Bidwell 
paid of his own means a gratuity of ten dollars to each of the 
ten men who subsequently enlisted. October 2l8t, The town 
ratified the action taken by the selectmen in filling the quota of 
the town, under the call for volunteers for nine months ; they 
having paid to each volunteer who enlisted for that term of ser- 
vice, and was credited to Monterey, a bounty of one hundred 
dollars. It was also voted to pay that amount of bounty to 
any one who should thereafter enlist to the credit of the town, 
either for three years or nine months, and an additional sum of 
five dollars " to any persons who will now enlist to fill a sup- 
posed deficiency of four." 




88 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1863. March 2d, The selectmen were directed to continue 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers, as 
heretofore. November 3d, The payment of State aid to the 
families of such volunteers as had died in the service of their 
country was directed to be continued the same as hitherto ; also 
to the families of drafted men. 

1864. June 14th, Twenty-five hundred dollars were appro- 
priated for recruiting purposes to fill the quota of the town ; and 
the selectmen were authorized to employ, if necessary, agents 
to aid them in their work. They were also authorized to pay 
two hundred and fifty dollars to each person who would procure 
a substitute, said amount to be paid when the substitute was 
mustered in and credited to the town. Five persons availed 
themselves of this offer. 

Monterey was reported in 1866 as having furnished fifty- 
eight men for the war, which is less than the actual number. 
It had a surplus of eight at the end of the war, over and above 
all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was three thousand 
eight hundred and forty-eight dollars and forty-four cents 
($3,848.44). 

The amount raised and expended by the town during the 
four years of the war for State aid to the families of volunteers, 
and which was subsequently refunded by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows : In 1861, $35.19 ; in 1862, $377.13 ; in 1863, 
$1,079.00; in 1864, $988.33; in 1865, $550.00. Total 
amount, $3,030.65. 

Of the ladies of Monterey, the town-clerk says, " All through 
the war they prepared clothing and other necessary articles for 
the soldiers." 

Mount Washington. — Incorporated June 21, 1779. Popu- 
lation in 1860, 221; in 1865, 233. Valuation in 1860, 
$79,294; in 1865, $87,676. 

The selectmen in 1861 were D. P. Turner, Isaac Spurr, Milo 
Smith; in 1862, Orrin C. Whitlock, Gilbert Race, Cyrus Lamp- 
son ; in 1863, Robert Campbell, Samuel Slater, D. P. Turner ; 



MOUNT WASHINGTON. 89 

in 1864, D. P. Turner, Isaac Spurr, Samuel Slater, Jr. ; in 
1865, Orrin C. Whitlock, Isaac Spurr, Samuel Slater. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1864, was Ira Shutt; in 

1863, H. S. Goodale ; in 1865, Samuel Slater, Jr. The town- 
treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Milo Smith ; in 1863 and 

1864, Ira Shutt. 

1861. No legal town-meeting appears to have been held, to 
act upon matters relating to the war, during this year. 

1862. At a regular town-meeting, held on the 30th of 
August, it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty 
dollars to each volunteer who should enlist in the military ser- 
vice of the United States and be credited to fill the quota of 
Mount Washington. 

1863. The only action by the town, in its corporate capacity, 
which had reference to the war during this year, was at a town- 
meeting held on the 9tb of August ; at which the selectmen were 
authorized to borrow whatever money might be necessary to 
pay during the year State aid to the families of soldiers. 

1864. On the 4th of April the selectmen were authorized to 
borrow money for aid to the soldiers' families. August 25th, 
The selectmen were authorized to pay to each volunteer, who 
should enlist for three years' service, and be credited to the town, 
a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars ; and they were 
directed " to enlist troops for this purpose." 

1865. April 3d, Voted, to raise money to pay State aid to 
the families of volunteers during the year. 

Mount Washington furnished twenty men for the war, which 
was in exact fulfilment of all demands made upon it. None 
were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of money ap- 
propriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was one thousand eight hundred and 
eighty-five dollars ($1,885.00). 

The amount of money raised by the town for the payment of 
State aid to the families of soldiers during the four years of the 
war, and which was afterwards reimbursed to it by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $236.95; 
in 1863, $245.00; in 1864, $609.00; in 1865, $150.66. 
Total amount, $1,241.61. 




90 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

New Ashford. — Incorporated Feb. 26, 1781. Population 
in 1860, 239 ; in 1865, 178. Valuation in 1860, $112,993 ; 
in 1865, $108,662. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Elihu Ingraham, Jr., Alfred 
Jordon, Jotham Beach; in 1862 and 1863, Elihu Ingraham, 
Jr., William B. Dewey, Van Ness Mallory; in 1864, Elihu 
Ingraham, Jr., Van Ness Mallory, Quincy A. Roys; in 1865, 
Elihu Ingraham, Jr., Hosea Beach, Phinehas Harmon. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Phinehas 
Harmon ; the town-treasurer for the same period, Hosea 
Beach. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters in 
relation to the war, was held on the 5th of November ; at which 
it was voted ** to pay the family of Charles Goodell fifty dollars, 
he having volunteered in the military service of the United 
States." 

1862. August 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of seventy-five 
dollars to each volunteer " who has already enlisted " in the 
military service, and been credited to the quota of the town. 

1863. At a meeting held on the 2d of March it was voted 
to pay to each volunteer, who shall enlist and be credited to the 
quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred dollars. On the 
6th of August this bounty was increased twenty-five dollars. 

1864. February 18th, The bounty to each volunteer who 
should enlist and be credited to the town was fixed at one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end 
of the war. The money to pay which was to be raised by 
taxation. 

New Ashford furnished twenty-three men for the war, which 
was a surplus of one over and above all demands. None were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of that paid for State aid to soldiers' families, was one thou- 
sand three hundred and eighty-five dollars ($1,385.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
aid to the families of soldiers during the four years of the 
war, and which was afterwards repaid to it by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows : In 1861, $52.00; in 1862, $76.00; in 



NEW MARLBOROUGH. 91 

1863, $144.00 ; in 1864, $68.40 ; in 1865, 00. Total amount, 
$340.40. 

New Marlborough. — Incorporated June 15, 1759. 
Population in 1860, 1,782; in 1865,1,649. Valuation in 
1860, $616,976; in 1865, $616,727. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Harry Rhodes, Martin E. 
Sheldon, James Andrew ; in 1862, Martin E. Sheldon, J. 
Andrew, Grove Gaylord ; in 1863, J. Andrew, Aaron Smith, 
Warren Walker ; in 1864, Warren Walker, Nathan A. Chapin, 
Henry Sisson; in 1865, Warren Walker, Nathan A. Chapin, 
William C. Kasson. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was Salmon K. Norton ; in 1862, 
1863, 1864, and 1865, Seth Pease. The town-treasurer in 
1861 and 1862 was Dyer Stanard; in 1863, Theron Warner; 
in 1864 and 1865, Benjamin Wheeler, Jr. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 2d of December, with 
special reference to the act of the extra session of the Legis- 
lature respecting the payment of State aid to the families of 
soldiers; at which, after proper consideration, it was voted 
that the selectmen be instructed to provide every volunteer's 
family, belonging to the town, with all the aid named in the 
act referred to ; also that they have authority to borrow what- 
ever money they may require for that purpose. 

1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 23d of July, 
to take action in regard to furnishing the quota of men required 
of the town in the recent call of the President for three hun- 
dred thousand volunteers, for three years' military service ; at 
which it was voted that the selectmen be authorized to direct 
the town-treasurer to borrow a sum of money sufficient to pay 
to each volunteer the sum of one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars, to be paid when such volunteer has been accepted and 
sworn into the service ; provided the number does not exceed the 
quota of the town. To this amount, George Stevens, Esq., a 
citizen of the town, added, from his own means and of his own 
accord, the sum of five dollars to each of the bounties. Another 
meeting was held on the 29th of August, at which the selectmen 




92 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each 
person who shall volunteer for nine months' service, and be 
mustered in and credited to the quota of the town ; and to 
authorize the treasurer to borrow money sufficient to pay the 
same. 

1863. A meeting was held on the 22d of September, at 
which the following vote was passed : — 

Voted, To raise the sum of two thousand seven hundred and 
thirty-five dollars and ninety cents, as the proportion of the town of 
New Marlborough, for reimbursing the Commonwealth for bounty 
money, assumed by said Commonwealth ; and appropriate the same 
for the payment of said proportion, in accordance with section 9, 
chapter 218, of the Acts of the Legislature of 18G3. 

1864. At the town-meeting held April 4th, five thousand 
seven hundred and fifty dollars were appropriated " to pay 
bounties to volunteers who have enlisted, or may enlist," to fill 
the quota of the town, — said bounty to be paid when the volun- 
teer is mustered in and credited ; and ^^ to reimburse those who 
have paid money on subscription for the above purpose." 
Another meeting was held on the 4th of June, at which the 
town voted to instruct the selectmen to enlist thirty men, " in 
anticipation of a future call of the President of the United 
States for more men for the military service ; " and the town- 
treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay the same. On 
the 5th of December, Grove Gaylord and Warren Walker 
were chosen a committee " to procure men enough for the mili- 
tary service to clear the town from draft, in anticipation of a 
future call from the President." The treasurer was authorized 
to borrow money. 

1865. At a town-meeting held on the 6th of March, it was 
voted to ''raise twenty-seven hundred dollars, to be paid to 
those who have paid, or help to pay, commutation-money ; and 
that said money be paid by the treasurer of the town to said 
persons, on the 1st of January, 1866." 

New Marlborough furnished, according to the returns made 
by the town-clerk in 1870, one hundred and fifty-nine men for 
the war, which, including the men who paid commutation, is 



OTIS. 93 

about its exact proportion ; but which does not include twenty- 
four men who enlisted in Connecticut regiments, and for which 
the town received no credit. New Marlborough filled all of its 
quotas, and at the end of the war had a surplus of twenty-two 
over and above all demands. Three were commissioned officers. 
The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was 
twenty-five thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight dollars 
and fifty-two cents ($25,778.52). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for aid to soldiers' families, 
and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $61.20; in 1862, $1,050.53; in 
1863, $2,527.52; in 1864, $1,757.20; in 1865, $1,500.00. 
Total in four years, $6,896.45. 

Otis. — Incorporated June 13, 1810. Population in 1860, 
998 ; in 1865, 962. Valuation in 1860, $256,822 ; in 1865, 
$311,595, 

The selectmen in 1861 were Elam P. Norton, Samuel A. 
Jones, Pardon Perry; in 1862, Samuel A. Jones, Nathaniel J. 
Kenyon, Pardon Perry; in 1863, Alanson Crittenden, Marcus 
Phelps, Lorenzo Webb ; in 1864, Alanson Crittenden, Isaac J. 
Norton, Amos D. Cotton; in 1865, Elam P. Norton, Samuel 
Hamilton, John Hunter. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was Joseph L. Waters. 

1861. May 11th, The town voted to pay each soldier seven 
dollars a month while in the service, and State aid to each 
family ; provided " the Legislature does not make the pay of the 
soldiers as good as the foregoing." 

1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to pay 
State aid to the families of volunteers. July 19th, Voted, to 
pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who 
shall enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of the 
town. August 26th, The selectmen were authorized to pay 
the same bounty to volunteers for nine months' service. 

1863. April 6th, Voted, to raise by tax fifteen hundred 




94 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

dollars for State aid to soldiers' families. November 3d, The 
selectmen were instructed to use whatever money may be 
received from the State, as the proportion of Otis of bounty- 
money paid to volunteers, "to cancel the indebtedness of the 
town for the same, and for no other purpose." 

1864. March 7th, The selectmen were directed to pay ''the 
same bounty to colored men enlisting to the credit of the town, 
as we pay to white men." May 9th, The bounty for three- 
years volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars. The selectmen were authorized to borrow two thou- 
sand dollars for recruiting purposes, ** and to refund to the ten 
drafted men who entered the service or paid commutation- 
money, each, the sum of one hundred dollars." June 24th, 
The selectmen w^ere authorized to borrow three thousand dollars 
for recruiting purposes. August Slst, Voted, " that the agents 
of the town for recruiting be directed to pay four-tenths of the 
cost of a substitute to any enrolled militia-man of said town 
who will put a substitute into the army, said substitute to 
answer on the present quota of the town ; said payments not 
to exceed four hundred dollars for a three-years man, three 
hundred for a two-years man, and one hundred for a one-year 
man." Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated for this 
purpose. December 1st, The treasurer was instructed to 
borrow two thousand dollars for recruiting purposes, provided 
the men subject to draft raise five hundred dollars.* 

1865. March 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
whatever money was necessary to pay State aid to the soldiers' 
families. 

Otis ixirnished one hundred and thirteen men for the war, 
which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands* 
One was a commissioned oflSccr. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was thirteen thousand seven hundred 
and forty-one dollars and seventy-four cents ($13,741.74). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 

* This amount waa raised by them, and paid over to the proper authorities. 



PERU. 95 

four years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid to it by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, 
$700.73; in 1863, $1,590.00; in 1864, $2,073.40; in 1865, 
$1,030.80. Total amount, $5,394.93. 

Peru. — Incorporated July 4, 1774. Population in 1860, 
499; in 1865, 494. Valuation in 1860, $218,200; in 1865, 
$214,930. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Turner Joy, Dwight Rockwell, 
B. J. Geer; in 1862, B. J. Geer, E. W. Pierce, J. M. 
Stowell ; in 1863, E. W. Pierce, J. M. Stowell, S. Shamway ; 
in 1864, E. W. Pierce, S. Shamway, James Barnes ; in 1865, 
E. W. Pierce, J. M. Stowell, J. S. Barnes. 

The town-clerk during the years 1861, 1862, and 1863, 
was S. B. Fench ; in 1864 and 1865, S. S. Bowen. The town- 
treasurer during all the years of the war was Ebenezer Haskell. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held May 13th ; at which it was voted 
that ^ the treasurer borrow five hundred dollars to be appropri- 
ated to the benefit of volunteers in our country's service, and 
their families, if needy ; that each volunteer shall receive eight 
dollars a month aid, or such sum as the district convention may 
agree upon. All of said appropriations are to be subjected to a 
committee of three." 

1862. July 19th, Voted, "that the treasurer borrow the 
sum of five hundred dollars to pay bounties offered to the four 
volunteers, as far as it will go.'* September 17th, Voted, "to 
pay all the nine -months volunteers that have been, and that 
hereafter may be, secured for our present quota, one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars each." Voted, "that each of the above- 
named volunteers shall receive twenty-five dollars in hand as 
soon as sworn into service, and that Mr, Edwards * shall receive 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars at that time." 

1863. September 21st, Voted, "to adopt the measures con- 
tained in section 9, chapter 218, of the Acts of 1863, and raise 
money as there provided." 

* We do not exactly understand this TOte in regard to Mr. Edwards. 



96 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1864. March 22d, Voted, *'that the selectmen be instructed 
to procure as many volunteers as may be thought necessary to 
fill our quota, by appropriating for each what money the law 
allows ; and the sum that may be expended beyond the one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars, or the limit of the law, be, and is 
hereby voted, and the selectmen be instructed to assess on the 
polls and estates of the inhabitants of Peru said sum.'' The 
selectmen were authorized to use the credit of the town to pay 
bounties. August 1st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer " to fill the present 
call." The treasurer was authorized to borrow six hundred and 
twenty-five dollars. One man in each school district was chosen 
to canvass the town for recruits. December 5th, The selectmen 
were directed to raise as many recruits as possible in anticipa- 
tion of other calls, ^* without limiting the amount of bounty 
paid*^ 

Peru furnished forty-four men for the war, which was a sur- 
plus of three over and above all demands. None of them were 
commissioned ofiScers. The whole amount appropriated and 
expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive of State aid, 
was three thousand three hundred and sixty dollars ($3,360.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the to^Ti for 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the 
four years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid to it by 
the Commonwealth, is as follows : In 1861, $72.83 ; in 1862, 
$311.03; in 1863, $319.50; in 1864, $240.00; in 1865, 
$225.00. Total amount, $1,168.36. 

PiTTSFiELD. — Incorporated April 21, 1761. Population in 
1860, 8,045 ; in 1865, 9,679. Valuation in 1860, $5,059,907 ; 
in 1865, $6,378,878. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were 
John C. West, Henry Colt, and Chauncey Goodrich. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was James 
Warriner; in 1865, James M. Barker. The town-treasurer 
during all of these years was Josiah Carter. 

1861. A large meeting of the citizens of Pittsfield was held 
on the 18th of April ; at which a committee was appointed to 



PITT8FIELD. 97 

aid the volunteers of the Pittsfield company, which had been 
ordered to join the Eighth Regiment at Springfield and proceed 
to Washington for a service of three months ; and to make suit- 
able provision for the comfort of their families during their 
absence. At a legal town-meeting, held on the 22d of May, 
the action of the citizens' committee was approved ; and the 
committee were authorized to continue in the performance of 
their duties. 

1862. March 3d, The selectmen were directed to pay State 
aid to the families of volunteers according to the statutes of the 
Commonwealth, and two thousand dollars were appropriated for 
that purpose. August 2d, The selectmen were directed to 
recruit men to fill the quota of the town, and to ^ ^^« bounty 
of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for 
three years and be credited to Pittsfield. The following resolu- 
tion was adopted : — 

Resclvedy That the forces of the United States should be adequate 
to suppress domestic insurrection and to repel foreign invasion ; and 
that, in order to maintain the authority of this Government and the 
integrity of the Union, the militia of the United States ought at once 
to be placed upon a war footing, so that a million of soldiers, if neces- 
sary, in addition to the Federal armies now in the field, may be in 
readiness to respond immediately to any draft which may be made by 
the Grovernment of the United States. 

August 25th, The bounty to each volunteer was raised to one 
hundred and fifty dollars. The treasurer was authorized to 
borrow money. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town in 
regard to bounties during this year. The selectmen continued 
to recruit men as before. 

1864. March 7th, A vote of thanks was passed to the gen- 
tlemen who had made a record of the volunteers belonging to 
Pittsfield, and compensation was allowed "to the recruiting 
officers." June 27th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer 
enlisting to the credit of the town, and the treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow money to pay the same. December 7th, The 

7 



98 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

bounty was increased to one hundred and fifty dollars, and so 
remained until the end of the war. 

Pittsfield furnished twelve hundred and one men for the 
war, which was a surplus of eighty-two over and above aU 
demands. Fifty-eight were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred 
and twenty thousand and ten dollars and seventy-two cents 
($120,010.72). 

The amount of money raised and expended for State aid to 
the families of volunteers during the four years of the war, and 
afterwards reimbursed to the town by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $976.12; in 1862, $5,161.34; in 1863, 
$8,162.00; in 1864, $1,200.00; in 1865, $10,781.53. Total 
amount, $36,980.99. 

Richmond. — Incorporated June 21, 1765. Population in 
1860, 914; in 1865, 913. Valuation in 1860, $489,346; in 
1865, $502,277. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Martin Slosson, H. B. Stevens, 
John Fairfield ; in 1862, Martin Slosson, Alanson E. Gaston, 
John Fairfield ; in 1863, Lewis C. Sherrill, Alanson E. Gaston, 
E. S. Rowley; in 1864 and 1865, E. S. Rowley, John Fair- 
field, George Cook. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was E. Williams ; in 1863 
and 1864, John Sherrill, 2d; in 1865, H. B. Stevens. The 
town-treasurer in 1861 was E. Williams ; in 1862, John A. 
Sharp ; in 1863, Rufus L. Hall ; in 1864, John Sherrill, 2d ; 
in 1865, H. B. Stevens. 

We have been unable to obtain a full and consecutive abstract 
of the votes passed at the various town-meetings, in relation to 
the war during the four years of its existence. Several were 
held each year, at which money was appropriated for the pay- 
ment of bounties to volunteers, and State aid to their families. 

In 1866 the selectmen made a return, in which they stated 
that the number of men fiirnished by Richmond for the war was 
seventy-two, which was probably the number of enlisted men who 



8ANDISFIELD. 99 

were inhabitants of the town, and did not include those who were 
enlisted in other places, or who paid commutation-money, and 
were credited to Richmond ; for the to\>ni must have furnished at 
least ninety-five men, as it filled its quota upon every call made 
by the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of five 
over and above all demands. Two were commissioned officers. 
The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was seven 
thousand six hundred and ninety dollars ($7,690.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 
volunteers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $231.15; in 
1863, $594.19; in 1864, $624.50; in 1865, $300.00. Total 
amount in four years, $1,749.84. 

**The ladies of Richmond sent several boxes of clothing, 
books, dried fruits, sweetmeats, and other necessaries and com- 
forts, to the soldiers in the field and hospitals, at different times 
during the war." 

Sandisfield. — Incorporated March 6, 1762. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 1,589; in 1865, 1,411. Valuation in 1860, 
$544,922 ; in 1865, $612,943. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Lucian Hotchkiss, 
Edward C. Wolcott, Milton Abbey ; in 1863, Lucian Hotch- 
kiss, Edward Phelps, Joshua M. Sears ; in 1864 and 1865, 
Samuel C. Parsons, Orlow Wolcott, Edward Ingham. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was W. W. 
Langdon. The town-treasurer during the same period was 
John O. Barker. 

Sandisfield is one of the very few towns in the Common- 
wealth from which we have failed to obtain a full and consecu- 
tive narrative of its proceedings during the war. We know, 
however, in general terms, that meetings were held during each 
year, at which money was appropriated for the payment of 
bounties to volunteers, and State aid to their families. 

By the return made by the selectmen in 1866, they claim to 
have fiimished one hundred and sixty-eight men for the war, 



'jiMt 



100 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

which we believe to be almost, if not exactly, correct ; for Sandis- 
field filled its quota upon every call made by the President for 
men, and at the end of the war had a surplus of thirteen over 
and above all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty 
thousand one hundred and forty-four dollars ($30,144.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, 
and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, $25.42; in 1862, $515.01; in 1863, 
$1,636.90; in 1864, $1,532.34; in 1865, $1,450.00. Total 
in four years, $5,159.67. 

Savoy. —Incorporated Feb. 20, 1797. Population in 1860, 
904; in 1865, 866. Valuation in 1860, $268,439; in 1865, 
$273,400. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Willis W. Barnett, Emerson L. 
Mason, Orin Tower ; in 1862, Melvin Bowker, Caleb Brown, 
Edward Mason ; in 1863, Melvin Bowker, George Hall, 
Ambrose B. Perkins ; in 1864, Emerson L. Mason, Henry P. 
Tyler, Willis W. Barnett; in 1865, Harrison Snow, Henry 
P. Tyler, Ambrose B. Perkins. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Harrison 
Snow. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, 
was William Sherman; in 1865, Henry F. Bliss. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 21st of September ; at 
which " the town, by a yea and nay vote, twenty-three yeas to 
seven nays," voted ** to hire a sum not exceeding one thousand 
dollars, in anticipation of money that may be reimbursed by the 
State, to pay aid to the families of soldiers." 

1862. At a town-meeting held on the 23d of July, it was 
voted to raise, by assessment ^^upon the inhabitants of the 
town, according to what they are actually worth," a sufficient 
amount of money to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to 
each volunteer who shall enlist for three years' military service, 
and be mustered in and credited to the town ; also, to exempt 



SAVOY. 101 

from taxation their property, while in the service ; also, to 
assess a tax of one dollar upon each poll, ^^for the benefit of the 
volunteers, in addition to their bounty ; " also, to pay each 
volunteer " ten dollars in advance, and the balance when 
mustered in and credited." At a meeting held on the 8th of 
September, it was voted to pay the same amount of bounty to 
volunteers who enlist^ and are credited, in the nine months' 
service ; and on the 15th of November the selectmen were 
authorized to pay the same amount of money to men w^ho may 
be drafted, belonging to the town. 

1863. At the town-meeting held on the 11th of April, it was 
voted to raise one thousand dollars for the payment of State aid 
to the families of volunteers ; and on the 13th of November the 
selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to 
the families of deceased soldiers. 

1864. At a meeting held on the 28th of March, " the chair- 
man of the selectmen was directed to go to Boston and ascer- 
tain if the quota of the town on the previous calls had been 
£Iled ; " and that " he be authorized to secure volunteers to fill all 
calls up to the present time, if they can be obtained at a reason- 
able rate." On the 6th of June the town voted to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars ** to each recruit 
who enlists to the credit of the town, up to March next." 

1865. At a meeting held on the 13th of March, the town 
voted to raise one thousand dollars for the payment of State 
aid to the families of soldiers ; and the selectmen were directed 
to continue recruiting, " to keep the quota of the town always 
full." 

Savoy furnished about ninety-five men for the war, which 
was a surplus of ten over and above all demands. None were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, and including $2,466.84 raised by 
private subscription, was nine thousand two hundred and forty- 
one dollars and sixty-three cents ($9,241.63). 

The amount of money raised and expended during the four 
years of die war for the payment of State aid to the families of 
soldiers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Common- 



102 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

wealth, was as follows : In 1861, $60.69 ; in 1862, $669.47 ; 
in 1863, $1,175.95; in 1864, $651.00; in 1865, $500.00. 
Total amount in four years, $3,058.11. 

Sheffield. — Incorporated June 22, 1733. Population in 
1860, 2,621; in 1865, 2,461. Valuation in 1860, $1,103,- 
728; in 1865, $1,206,820. 

The selectmen in 1861 and the four succeeding years were 
E. E. Callender, Abner Roys, Henry Burtch. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was W. B. Saxton ; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, John D. Burtch. The town-treasurer 
in 1861 was W. B. Saxton ; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, and 
1865, John D. Burtch. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider war matters, 
was held May 4th. Oliver Peck was chosen moderator. It 
was voted that the moderator and clerk of the meeting petition 
the Governor, in behalf of the town, for " the immediate assem- 
bling of the Legislature of this Commonwealth." " On motion 
of E. F. Ensign, a resolution passed at a legal meeting of the 
inhabitants of the town of Sheffield, held on the 18th day of 
June, 1776, was read, and ordered to be put on file." A com- 
mittee of five was appointed ** to report a series of resolutions." 
The committee were G. A. Root, E. F. Ensign, Z. Candee, 
Archibald Taft, and Leonard Tuttle. They reported, Ist, That 
two thousand dollars be raised for the proper equipment and 
pay of citizens who may volunteer in the military service ; 2d, 
That each volunteer be paid by the town nine dollars a month 
while in the service ; 3d, That the families of soldiers shall 
receive comfortable assistance ; 4th, That G. A. Boot, Samuel 
H. Bushnell, Leonard Tuttle, T. B. Strong, and H. D. Train 
be a committee with full powers to expend the money ; 5th, 
That said committee be authorized to borrow, not exceeding 
four thousand dollars, on the faith and credit of the town ; 6th, 
That said committee shall receive no compensation for services, 
''and that their charges for necessary expenses shall be sub- 
mitted to the selectmen for approval ; " 7th, The town-treasurer 
was instructed to pay all drafts made upon him by said commit- 
tee ; 8th, The committee was ^ to proceed immediately to form 



/ 



SHEFFIELD. 103 

a military company." The report was accepted, with only one 
dissenting vote. The four thousand dollars was to be raised by 
a tax ; and the treasurer was directed to keep a separate and dis- 
tinct account " of all money raised and expended in conformity 
with the foregoing resolutions." November 5th, Voted, that 
the sum of five hundred dollars, ** or such part thereof as may 
be deemed necessary, is hereby appropriated to the payment of 
such bounty, and allowances to the wives, children, and parents 
of volunteers, as is allowed by the laws of this Common- 
wealth." 

1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit 
of the town. A committee of one from each school district 
was appointed ^*to solicit enlistments, and to report to the chair- 
man of the selectmen weekly." The treasurer was authorized 
to borrow money, and the committee already appointed was ''to 
solicit subscriptions of money to be given volunteers." August 
23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each 
volunteer for nine months' service, and the selectmen to borrow 
money for the purpose. A committee of five was appointed 
to procure volunteers. November 4th, Voted, to borrow, not 
exceeding two thousand dollars, for aid to the families of 
soldiers. 

1863. September, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of 
men who have been drafted. December 2Gth, Voted, to pay the 
selectmen and recruiting oflicers fifteen dollars for each new re- 
cruit, and twenty-five dollars for each veteran recruit, enlisting 
to the credit of the town ; voted, to pay their expenses, and 
three dollars a day while engaged in recruiting. 

1864. April 4th, Voted, to raise three thousand dollars to 
procure volunteers, and to fix the bounty at one hundred and 
fifty dollars. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money 
to pay the same. May 4th, The sum to be borrowed was 
increased to four thousand dollars. June 18th, The selectmen 
were authorized to recruit thirty-five men to fill the quota of the 
town " at the cheapest possible rate," and to borrow " such sums 
of money " as may be required for that purpose. August 13th, 
Voted, to recruit five men, and to pay each a bounty of one 



i 



104 MASSACHUSETTS IK THE REBELLIOX. 

hundred and twenty-five dollars ; voted, that there be de- 
posited with the State Treasurer " one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars each for ten men for recruits." Henry Burtch was 
chosen " to investigate in regard to re-enlistments for tins town." 
December 13th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow four 
thousand dollars, to pay bounties for thirty-two men to fill the 
quota of the town. 

1865. April 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. A vote 
of thanks was passed to the selectmen who had served through 
the years of the war, and who declined a re-election, for their 
services in procuring recruits during the Rebellion. 

Sheffield furnished two hundred and sixty-nine men for the 
military service, which was a surplus of eight over all demands. 
Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
raised and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive 
of State aid, was thirty thousand and thirty-three dollars and 
sixty-eight cents ($30,033.68). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the four years of the war, and afterwards reimbursed by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $80.36 ; in 1862, 
$1,867.56 ; in 1863, $4,859.71 ; in 1864, $4.300.00 ; in 1865, 
$3,400.00. Total amount, $14,507.63. 

Stockbridge. — Incorporated June 22, 1739. Population 
in 1860, 2,136 ; in 1865, 1,967. Valuation in 1860, $976,256 ; 
in 1865, $1,323,883. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Daniel Fairchild, William Darbe, 
Reuben Lynch; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Henry M. Burrell, 
William Darbe, Henry D. Palmer; in 1865, M. Warner, 
Mason Van Deusen, Carlton Curtis. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was E. Sey- 
mour. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Nathan A. Waters ; 
during the years 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, E. Seymour. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 3d of May ; at which it was 
voted to borrow, not exceeding two thousand dollars, for the 



STOGKBRIDOE. 105 

purchase of suitable clotlies and equipments for the volunteers 
M'ho shall go into the military service from "that town and 
yicinity.** The selectmen were also directed to take charge of 
the arms and equipments " now on their way from the Adjutant- 
General, that they may be properly kept and returned when 
demanded." June 15th, The selectmen were directed to pay 
State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the laws 
of the Commonwealth. 

18 62. April 7th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow, 
not exceeding one thousand dollars, for the payment of State aid 
to the soldiers' families during the year. July 26th, Voted, to 
pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each 
volunteer for three years, when mustered into the military ser- 
vice, and credited to the quota of the town. The selectmen 
were authorized to immediately open a recruiting-office, and to 
borrow money to pay the bounties. August 25th, Voted, to 
pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine 
months' service, and to borrow money to pay the same. 

1863. August 1st, The selectmen were directed to pay State 
aid to the families of drafted men the same as to the families of 
volunteers ; also, the expense of transportation of the drafted 
men from Stockbridge to the military camp at Springfield, and 
to borrow money, if necessary, for that purpose. November 3d, 
The selectmen were appointed to solicit subscriptions to pay 
bounties to volunteers who may enlist to fill the quota of the 
town "under the last call of the President." Voted, to abate 
the poll-taxes of all soldiers in the service belonging to Stock- 
bridge. 

1864. May 21st, Voted, to raise and assess the sum of three 
thousand one hundred and sixty dollars, in addition to the eight 
hundred appropriated April 4th, to fill the quota of the town, 
and to pay what has already been paid by subscription. June 
1st, The selectmen were instructed to recruit twenty-five more 
volunteers, " to apply to the next call for men." 

1865. November 7th, Eev. A. H. Dashiell, Charles Good- 
rich, and Professor F. Hoffman were appointed to "take into 
consideration the subject of erecting a monument to the memory 
of the soldiers of Stockbridge who had fallen in the war." 




106 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Stockbridge furnished about two hundred and thirty-six men 
for the war, including those who belonged to other places, and 
those who paid commutation-money, which was a sur{)lu8 of 
twenty-six over and above all demands. Eight were commis- 
sioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and 
expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was fifteen thousand and twenty-nine dollars and fifty-six 
cents ($15,029.56). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during the four years of the war, 
and afterwards repaid to it by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $378.64; in 1862, $2,049.53; in 1863, 
$3,450.19; in 1864, $3,263.62; in 1865, $2,000.00. Total 
amount, $11,141.96. 

The ladies of Stockbridge organized a Soldiers' Aid Society, 
and " held meetings almost every week during the war to do 
soldiers' work, and forwarded at different times large quantities 
of under-clothing and other valuable articles to the army and 
hospitals, to the money value of several thousand dollars." 

A very handsome brown-stone monument has been erected 
to the memory of the men of Stockbridge who died for their 
country in the war of the Rebellion. The cost of the monu- 
ment was twenty-six hundred dollars. It is erected near the 
centre of the village, to which it is an ornament, as well as an 
honor to the memory of those who fell. 

Tyringham. — Incorporated March 6, 1762. Population 
in 1860, 730; in 1865, 650. Valuation in 1860, $293,228; 
in 1865, $299,594. 

The selectmen in 1861 were E. G. Hale, J. M. Northup, 
J. G. Garfield; in 1862, E. G. Hale, J. G. Garfield, A. G. 
Sweet; in 1863, J. M. Garfield, G. W. Garfield, C. E. Slater; 
in 1864, E. G. Hale, H. Clark, Orson Webster ; in 1865, 
E. G. Hale, Daniel Clark, John Canon. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was J. W. 
Wilson; in 1865, Albert C. Heath. The town-treasurer in 
1861 was Elijah Garfield; in 1862, Charles E. Slater; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, A. C. Heath. 



TTRINOHAM. 107 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
connected with the war, was held on tlie 1st of July ; at which 
the selectmen were authorized to borrow money for the payment 
of State aid to families of volunteers. 

1862. April 7th, "Voted, that the selectmen borrow and 
pay over to tlie families of volunteers, at the end of each month, 
the amount the State allows." July 23d, Voted, to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall 
enlist within ten days for three years' service, and be credited 
to the quota of the town. August 21st, Voted, to pay three- 
years volunteers a bounty of two hundred dollars, and those for 
nine months one hundred dollars. 

1863. April 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money for the payment of State aid to the families of volun- 
teers. 

1864. April 4th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years' service. 
S. D. Thatcher was appointed recruiting agent for the town, 
with authority to pay, if necessary, a bounty of three hundred 
dollars to three-years volunteers, under any future call of the 
President for men ; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money for that purpose. Voted, to assess a tax of thirty-two 
hundred dollars. 

1865. April 3d, Voted, to pay the expenses heretofore 
incurred in recruiting volunteers to fill the quota of the town ; 
and to raise fifteen hundred dollars by taxation, for recruiting 
purposes in the future, and commutation-money to drafted men. 
The amount of commutation to free a man from service who had 
been drafted and accepted was three hundred dollars. The 
town allowed to each drafted man in Tyringham, who had been 
accepted, two hundred and fifty dollars for commutation-money ; 
the remaining fifty dollars he was to provide himself. 

Tyringham furnished about seventy-four men for the war, 
which was the exact number required to fill its quotas under 
the several calls of the President for volunteers. One was a 
commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was six thousand nine hundred and sixty dollars 
($6,960.00). 



108 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELtlOX. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to 
the families of soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid to it 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $310.14 ; in 
1862, $564.37 ; in 1863, $656.00 ; in 1864, $160.00 ; in 1865, 
00. Total amount, $1,681.51. 

Washington. — Incorporated April 12,1777. Population 
in 1860, 948; in 1865, 859. Valuation in 1860, $299,622; 
in 1865, $289,398. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Charles Crosier, Edmund 
Spencer, James M. Chapel ; in 1862, D. W. Dunham, Qiarles 
Crosier, Alanson S. Pomeroy ; in 1863, Charles Crosier, 
Alanson S. Pomeroy, John M. Crane; in 1864 and 1865, 
D. W. Dunham, Simpson Bell, Charles Coates. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, was 
J. S. Brooker. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was 
John M. Crane; in 1863, D. W. Dunham; in 1864, Samuel 
O. Brooker; in 1865, George Abbott. 

1861. There does not appear to have been any formal town- 
meeting held during this year, to act upon matters relating to the 
war ; although a number of popular meetings were held, at 
which addresses were made by prominent gentlemen of the 
county, among whom were Charles M. Emerson, of Pittsfield, 
Judge Page, William M. Walker, and others. 

1862. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 1st of September ; at 
which it was voted to pay a bounty " of seventy-five dollars 
to each of the seven volunteers who enlisted for three years, 
and one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' 
service." 

1863. There appears to have been no action taken by the 
town in regard to the war, in its corporate capacity, during this 
year ; none probably having been necessary. • 

1864. On the 11th of April a town-meeting was held, at 
which it was voted " to raise one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
for each volunteer under the last call of the President; " also, 
" that the selectmen be instructed to go to Boston, and, if pos- 



WEST STOCKBRIDOE. 109 

sible, ^procure a sufficient number of men to fill the quota of the 
town." A gentleman for wliom we have a high regard, and 
who knew '^all about it," writes : '' War-meetings were held to 
encourage enlistments, to help the noblest and best of govern- 
ments the sun ever shone upon ; and young men volunteered, 
in cases not a few, where their parents refused granting their 
requests to join the Union army, and being under age were 
thus kept at home." 

Washington furnished about one hundred men for the ser- 
vice, and filled its quota upon every call made by the 
President for men, and at the end of the war had a surplus of 
one, over and above every demand made upon it. Two were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was six thousand dollars ($6,000.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 
four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed to 
it by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $94.85; 
in 1862, $662.08; in 1863, $1,298.39; in 1864, $977.21 ; in 
1865, $600.00. Total amount, $3,632.53. 

" The ladies of Washington met on various occasions, 
and prepared lint and bandages for the wounded soldiers in 
hospitals." 

West Stockbridge. — Incorporated Feb. 23, 1774. Popu- 
lation in 1860, 1,589; in 1865, 1,621. Valuation in 1860, 
$602,010: in 1865, $613,816.. 

llie selectmen in 1861 were Franklin B. Cone, Daniel A. 
Treat, Charles E. Rees ; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, George 
W. Kniflfen, Henry T. Ford, Thomas W. Barnes; in 1865, 
Henry T. Ford, Charles S. Piatt, John P. Pomeroy. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was William C. Spaulding. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters re- 
lating to the war, was held on the 18th of November ; at which 
the selectmen were authorized to pay State aid to the families of 
volunteers, as provided by law. The treasurer was directed to 



110 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

keep a separate account of the money so expended, and to report 
the amount at the next annual meeting. 

1862. March 10th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appro- 
priated for State aid to the families of volunteers residing in 
the town ; and the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of 
one hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for the 
term of three years, and be mustered into the military service, 
and credited to the quota of the town. The treasurer was aur 
thorized to borrow money to pay said bounties. It was also 
voted to remit the payment of poll-taxes assessed and paid by 
persons who have enlisted, or who shall afterwards enlist, in the 
military ser\dce. August 18th, The selectmen were authorized 
to borrow money, and pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to 
each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months' service, and be 
credited to fill the quota of the town. 

1863. March 10th, Seventeen hundred dollars were appro- 
priated for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers 
during the year. July 27th, The selectmen were directed to 
pay the same amount of State aid to the families of men who 
may be drafted as is paid to the families of volunteers. Decem- 
ber 29th, The selectmen were authorized "to draw from the 
treasury fifteen dollars for every new recruit, and twenty-five 
dollars for every veteran recruit, enlisting to the credit of the 
town, to be paid in advance of the premiums allowed by 
Government.** 

1864. March 7th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated 
for the payment of State aid during the year to the families of 
soldiers residing in West Stockbridge. March 28th, Voted, to 
raise fifteen hundred dollars by taxation for recruiting purposes. 
The selectmen were authorized to borrow that amount, in antici- 
pation of the tax, "as they may require;" also, to raise one 
thousand dollars by taxation, to pay fifty dollars to each volun- 
teer " who has not received that amount of local bounty ; " and 
to refund to citizens money which they have voluntarily con- 
tributed to encourage enlistments. The selectmen were directed 
to make such arrangements as they might judge expedient to 
procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town. April 8th, 
The selectmen were authorized to take such action " as they 



WILLIAMSTOWN. Ill 

may deem proper under the act of the Legislature approved 
March 28th, 1864 ; "which act allowed money to be raised by 
taxation to pay bounties to volunteers, but limited the amount 
to be paid to each volunteer to one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars." On the 9th of July, the town voted to avail itself of 
the provisions of this act. August 9th, The selectmen were 
authorized to pay the bounty prescribed by the act of March 
28th, 1864, in gold. 

1865. March 6th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated 
for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during 
the year. May 13th, Voted, to raise by taxation sixty-five 
hundred dollars, to refund money subscribed and paid by citi- 
zens to encourage recruiting. 

West Stockbridge furnished one hundred and sixty men for 
the war, which was a surplus of eight over and above all 
demands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid paid to soldiers' families, 
was seventeen thousand and twenty-six dollars and thirty-two 
cents ($17,026.32). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for the pajrment of State aid to 
the families of soldiers, and afterwards reimbursed to it by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $22.63; in 1862, 
$1,217.02; in 1863, $2,097.86; in 1864, $2,161.04; in 
1865, $1,800.00. Total amount, $7,298.55. 

WiLLiAMSTOWN. — Incorporated June 21, 1765. Popu- 
lation in 1860, 2,611 ; in 1865," 2,563. Valuation in 1860, 
$1,173,222; in 1865, $1,160,587. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John E. Bulkley, 
William E. Johnson, Nathan Field ; in 1863 and 1864, Harvey 
T. Cole, William E. Johnson, Daniel Dewey ; in 1865, Calvin 
K. Taft, Daniel Dewey, William E. Johnson. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Daniel 
Dewey; in 1865, Samuel T. Mather. The town-treasurer in 
1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Harvey T. Cole; in 1865, 
J. H. Whipple. 



112 MASSACHUSETTS IX THE BEBELLION. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters in 
relation to the war, was held on the Sd of June ; at which five 
thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to the families 
of volunteers helon5:in<2: to Williamstown. 

1862. March 10th, The selectmen were directed " to con- 
tinue to assist the families of volunteers." Voted, to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist 
for three years' service, and be credited to the quota of the 
town. Messrs. St. E. Hoxey, Harvey T. Cole, Calvin R. 
Taft, and Daniel Dewey were chosen a committee, with author- 
ity to borrow thirty-one hundred dollars to procure volunteers 
and pay bounties. Two hundred dollars were allowed for the 
personal expenses of said committee while in the performance 
of their duties. September 6th, The same bounty was directed 
to be paid to volunteers for nine months' service. 

1863. January 6th, The selectmen were directed to recruit 
volunteers to fill the quota of the town, and to pay each man, 
when properly credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of 
one hundred and fifty dollars. March 14th, "Voted, to pay 
State aid to the families of all persons belonging to Williams- 
town in the military and naval service of the United States." 

1864. August 8th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer for three years' service, when credited to the quota of the 
town ; and to appoint " a recruiting agent to be nominated by a 
meeting of the enrolled men of the town." A recruiting agent 
was appointed. December 20th, The same bounty was directed 
to be paid to volunteers under the new call of the President for 
more men ; and the selectmen were authorized to borrow money 
to pay said bounties and the expenses of the recruiting agent. 
December 30th, " Voted, that the selectmen vigorously prose- 
cute the work of enlistment until there shall be forty men en- 
listed." 

1865. March 13th, The selectmen were directed to continue 
the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families during the 
year. 

Williamstown furnished two hundred and sixty men for the 
war, which was a surplus of eighteen over and above all 



WINDSOR. 113 

demands. Six were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifteen thousand four 
hundred and fifteen dollars ($15,415.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the four years of the war, and afterwards reimbursed to it by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $451.64; in 
1862, $2,045.27; in 1863, $2,734.01; in 1864, $4,300.00; 
in 1865, $2,400.00. Total amount, $11,930.92. 

Windsor. — Incorporated July 2, 1771. Population in 
1860, 839; in 1865, 753. Valuation in 1860^ $337,275; in 
1865, $303,324. 

The selectmen in 1861 were James Whitmarsh, Reuben 
Pierce, H. L. Allen ; in 1862, Ellison Axtell, A. L. Clark, 
A. W. Warren ; in 1863 and 1864, C. Baldwin, H. N. Wins- 
low, James Whitmarsh ; in 1865, James Whitmarsh, H. N. 
Winslow, George Hathaway. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Chapin 
Converse. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1864, and 1865, 
was Norman Miner; in 1863, Solomon Capen. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 10th of May, at which a 
committee was appointed to canvass the town for recruits for 
military service. Another committee was appointed to confer 
with the authorities of the adjoining towns to agree upon some 
uniform plan of recruiting. The town voted to pay each volun- 
teer credited to Windsor, while in the service, eight dollars a 
month, and to furnish him with a uniform and equipments, not 
to exceed in cost twenty-five dollars ; also, to provide for the 
comfortable support of his family. 

The town records do not give farther particulars in regard 
to the ways and means used by the town to raise money and 
furnish recruits, as the practice was to leave these matters with 
a committee, with full powers to act as they thought best for the 
interest of the service and the best good of the town. 

Windsor furnished ninety-eight men for the war, which was 

8 



114 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

a surplus of thirteen over and above all demands. None were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town on account of the w^ar, 
exclusive of State aid, was nine thousand six hundred and eiorhtv- 
seven dollars and seventy-one cents ($9,687.71). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years of 
the war, and afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, $27.34; in 1862, $647.91; in 1863, 
$1,194.83; in 1864, $1,139.00; in 1865, $800.00. Total 
amount, $3,809,08. 



CHAPTER IV. 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 



The county of Bristol is bounded north by Norfolk County, 
east by Plymouth, south-east by Buzzard's Bay, and west 
by the counties of Providence, Bristol, and Newport, Rhode 
Island. It is divided into nineteen municipalities, of which 
New Bedford, Fall River, and Taunton are cities. The entire 
population of the county in 1860 was 93,794, in 1865 it was 
89,339 ; being a decrease in five years of 4,455. The popu- 
lation in 1870 was 102,886, being an increase in five years 
of 13,191. The total valuation of the county in 1860 was 
$66,294,526, in 1865 it was $87,428,503; being an increase 
in five years of $21,133,983. 

This county gives rise to several streams, which fall into 
Massachusetts and Narragansett Bays, the most important of 
which is "Taunton Great River," that in times past was 
famous for its herring fisheries. New Bedford and Dartmouth 
are well known as being the chief seats of the whale-fishery. 
Fall River and Taunton are largely engaged in manufactures of 
various kinds. The aggregate value of articles manufactured 
in the county in 1865 was $55,038,314. The surface of tlie 
county "is somewhat broken, but generally level ; its soil in 
many parts is of an inferior quality. It has a maritime coast 
of considerable extent, indented with numerous headlands, small 
bays and harbors ; " and its people are extensively engaged in 
navigation and the fishery, though of late years the attention of 
its capitalists has been more generally given to manufacturing. 
The county is also well provided with railroad accommodations. 

Brbtol County furnished full nine thousand men for the army 
and navy during the four years of the war. Every city and 



116 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

town filled its quota upon every call for men made by the 
President ; and each one had a surplus at the end of the contest, 
which, in the aggregate, amounted to fifteen hundred men, of 
which number eleven hundred and ten belonged to New Bed- 
ford. This large surplus, in a good degree, was occasioned by 
the navy credits, which were allowed by act of Congress passed 
July 4th, 1864. 

The aggregate of war expenses incurred by the cities and 
towns in the county during the four years of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was $904,175.03. The amount of private contri- 
butions in aid of recruiting were $50,500.00. The total 
amount of money raised and expended by the entire county for 
State aid to the families of volunteers in the army and navy 
during the four years of the war, and which was repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was $553,043.12. 

AcuSHNET. — Formerly part of Fairhaven ; incorporated 
Feb. 13, 1860. Population in 1860, 1,387; in 1865, 1,251. 
Valuation in 1860, $784,837 ; in 1865, $656,500. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Cyrus E. 
Clark, Benjamin Wilson, Benjamin White ; in 1864 and 1865, 
Cyrus E. Clark, Walter Spooner, Pardon Tabor. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during each year of the 
war was Jabez Wood. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in 
its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year. 

1862. At a legal town-meeting, held on the 19th of July, 
the town voted to pay each person who shall enlist in the mili- 
tary service for three years, and be mustered in and credited to 
the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and fifty 
dollars. George S. Kussell, Rodolphus Swift, and James 
Hammet were chosen a committee to assist the selectmen in 
recruiting volunteers to fill the contingent of the town. The 
selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the bounties. 
Another meeting was held on the 19th of August, at which it 
was voted to increase the bounty fifty dollars ; and, at an 
adjourned meeting held on the 28th of November, it was voted 
to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who 



ACUSHNET. 117 

shall enlist for nine months' service, and be credited to the quota 
of the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money 
to pay the same. Godfrey C. Macomber, Charles G. Davis, 
Joseph R. Davis, and Adoniram Gilmore were added to the 
recruiting committee. On the 29th of December the select- 
men were authorized to borrow whatever sums of money may be 
necessary for the payment of State aid to the families of volun- 
teers belonging to Acushnet. 

1863. No action appears to have been necessary for the 
town, in its official capacity, to fill its quota and pay bounties 
and State aid during this year. 

1864. A meeting was held on the 4th of April, at which it 
was voted " to raise eight hundred dollars for the payment of 
bounties, and to reimburse citizens who had advanced money to 
assist in filling the quotas of the town." It was further voted, 
that the selectmen furnish a statement of the amount of money 
raised by individuals by voluntary contribution, to encourage 
volunteers to enlist; and where they have fully obtained the 
whole amount so paid, they shall hand it over to the assessors," 
who shall assess the amount upon the property of the town. 
At a meeting held on the 6th of June, the selectmen were 
authorized to make a contract with the city authorities of New 
Bedford, to have a portion of their surplus of volunteers trans- 
ferred to Acushnet, under the pending call.* The town voted 
to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each 
volunteer who should enlist prior to March 1, 1865, and be 
credited to the town. The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money to pay the same. It was also voted "that so much as 
may be necessary to furnish our town's quota under the present 
call be assessed at the next annual assessment." 

The selectmen in 1866 reported that Acushnet had furnished 
one hundred and six men for the war, which is probably thirty 
less than the actual number ; as the town furnished its full quota 
on every call made by the President, and at the end of the war 
had a surplus of twenty over and above all demands. None 

♦ The arrangement was made ; but it was subsequently ascertained that the 
men so transferred rightly belonged to Acushnet, tliey having enlisted in the 
nary from that town. 



118 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was eleven thousand two hundred and 
fifty one dollars, and fifty-two cents ($11,251.52). 

The whole amount of money raised and expended by the 
town, during the years of the war, for State aid to the families 
of volunteers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows: In 1861, $21.14; in 1862, $783.35; 
in 1863, $1,250.09; in 1864, $764.66; in 1865, $600.00. 
Totsil amount, $3,419.24. 

Attlebokough. — Incorporated Oct. 19, 1694. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 6,066; in 1865, 6,200. Valuation in 1860, 
$2,466,316; in 1865, $2,206,660. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Handel W. Daggett, A. H. 
Robinson, Lewis L. Kead ; in 1862, Handel W. Daggett, A. 
H. Robinson, Joseph A. Perry ; in 1863 and 1864, II. N. 
Richardson, A. H. Robinson, Joseph A. Perry; in 1865, Wil- 
lard Blackinton, A. H. Robinson, Joseph A. Perry. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Shepard VV. Carpen- 
ter; in 1863 and 1864, H. A. Richardson; in 1865, Willard 
Blackinton. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Georfje 
Price; in 1863 and 1864, George D. Hatch; in 1865, Handel 
AV. Daggett. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 3d of May ; at which it 
was — 

Voted, That the treasurer be authorized to borrow ten thousand 
dollai*s, to be used for military purposes as fast as required ; that from it 
those men who enlist in this town and are called into actual service shall 
be paid a bounty of fifteen dollars a month, in addition to the Govern- 
ment pay ; and that each man who is accepted for service shall be paid 
ten dollars a month while drilling, and shall be furnished such uniform 
as the military authorities require. 

Voted, To present a vote of thanks to the ladies of Attleborough 
for their kind oifer to prepare clothing for those who may leave this 
town to serve their country, and record in the town-books the fol- 
lowing letter received from them: — 

" The ladies of Attleborough wait only an opportunity of testifying 



ATTLEBOROUGH. 119 

their deep interest in the cause of freedom, and their earnest faith that 
our flag shall be kept unsullied. They rejoice that the present crisis has 
proved, beyond doubt, that brave, unselfish heroism still exists in our 
land, roused by no pulse of passion, but beating with the calm, deter- 
mined will that treachery has roused, and only victory shall appease. 
Their wishes and sympathies are with our brave troops ; and in pre- 
paring clothing for those who go from their midst, they offer speedy, 
cheerful, and zealous hands." 

This communication was signed by Mrs. Cherra M. Blackinton, 
and thirty-three others of the most respectable and influential 
ladies of Attleborough. Another town-meeting was held on 
the 25th of May, at which it was voted that the selectmen have 
full charge of the expenditure of the military fund appropriated 
at the last town-meetino:. At a meetinor held on the 12th of 
June, it was voted " to instruct the selectmen to furnish such 
additional items of uniform as they may legally do under the 
appropriation of May 3d for such purposes ; also, that they pay 
to our volunteers for drilling the sum of ten dollars, or such 
part thereof as corresponds with the vote referred to ; " and 
authority w^s given them to draw upon the fund to pay the 
same. At a meeting held on the 5th of September, the treas- 
urer was authorized to borrow such sums of money as may be 
required, in anticipation of the same being raised by taxation, 
to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. 

1862. At a special town-meeting held on the 21st of July, 
the following resolutions were read by Hon. John Daggett, and 
unanimously adopted : — 

Resolved^ That we, the inhabitants of Attleborough, fully appreciating 
the value of the free institutions under which we have so long lived 
and prospered, and alive to the dangers which threaten their existence 
and the dismemberment of the Republic, are ever ready to do our 
part in sustaining those institutions, and transmitting them unimpaired 
to those who shall come after us. 

Resolved^ That we deem it our duty to tiike immediate measures to 
furnish the quota of volunteers for this town, under the recent call of 
the President of the United States ; therefore — 

Resolved^ That the selectmen be, and they hereby are, authorized 
to pay from the treasury of the town a bounty of one himdred dollars 
to each person who shall enlist in this town as a volunteer, and shall 
be duly enrolled and accepted. 




120 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Resolved, That the treasurer of the town be, and he is hereby, 
authorized to borrow the sura of six thousand three hundred dollars 
for this purpose, and give his notes therefor. 

Several other votes were passed at this meeting in regard to 
bounties ; and one appointing a committee of nine, " three from 
each part of the town, to aid the selectmen in recruiting." The 
selectmen were also directed " to extend aid to the sick soldiers 
who have been discharged from service," and a committee was 
chosen to have the proceedings of the meeting ** published in the 
* Union Gazette and Democrat.' " At a meeting held on the 6th 
of August it was voted to appropriate "the sum of two hundred 
dollars, in addition to the sum appropriated at the last meeting, 
for the encouragement of enlistments ; and to authorize the 
treasurer to borrow money to carry the same into effect." This 
bounty was to be paid "to all volunteers who enlist on or be- 
fore the 15th of August, and to pay no bounty after that date." 
It was voted, also, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to 
each person who would enlist for nine months' service on or 
before September Ist, and be mustered in and credited to the 
quota of the town. August 23d, The vote not to pay bounties 
after the 15th of August was reconsidered ; and the selectmen 
were directed to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to volun- 
teers for nine months' service, who would enlist and be credited 
to the quota of the town before the 1st of September. The 
treasurer was authorized to borrow money for bounties and 
recruiting expenses. The following resolutions were read and 
adopted : — 

Resolved, That we, the citizens of Attleborough, in town-meeting 
assembled, do highly appreciate the military services of the members 
of Company I, Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers ; that we 
remember with gratitude that they promptly responded to the call of 
our country when the shrill clarion of war sounded to arms for the 
purpose of crushing out a wicked rebellion. 

Resolved, That we hold in grateful remembrance the sacrifices 
which they made when they left behind them the loved ones at home, 
and all the endearing associations that cluster around the domestic 
altar, and exchanged those comforts and pleasures for the stern duties 
of the camp and the battle-field ; and that we will do what we can, by 



ATTLEBOROUGH. 121 

our influence and means, to encourage their hearts, and awaken in 
their souls the true fire of patriotism, which they rightfully inherit 
from a noble ancestry. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be transmitted to the 
acting Captain of Company I, and published in the ** Taunton 
Gazette." 

1863. At a special meeting on the 3d of August, the town 
voted to pay its proportion of money to the State treasurer, in 
accordance with section 9 of chapter 116 of the Acts of 1863. 
Also to pay State aid to the families of drafted men. 

1864. On the 29th of March the town voted to refund to 
citizens the money they had contributed to pay bounties and 
encourage recruiting to fill the quota of the town on the last 
call of the President for volunteers. The treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow the money. On the 5th of April the bounty to 
each volunteer who should enlist to the credit of the town was 
fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

Several other meetings were held during the year, to raise 
money and means to obtain volunteers, pay State aid to sol- 
diers* families, and to reimburse citizens who had advanced 
money to encourage recruiting. 

The selectmen in 1866 reported that the town had furnished 
five hundred and twenty-four men for the war ; but the real 
number was probably about six hundred and twenty-five, as the 
town at the end of the war had a surplus of twenty-six, after 
having filled its quota upon every call made by the President for 
men. Twenty were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was sixty-five thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-two dollars and fifty cents ($65,882.50). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to 
the soldiers' families, and which was afterwards repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $3,876.80 ; in 1862, 
$11,092.47; in 1863, $12,853.56 ; in 1864, $12,050.81; in 
1865, $6,500.00. Total amount in four years, $45,873.64. 

The ladies of Attleborough, in their labors in behalf of the 
soldiers during the war, nobly fulfilled the promise made by 
them at the beginning. 



il 



122 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Berkley. — Incorporated April 18, 1735. Population in 
1860, 825; in 1865, 888. Valuation in 1860, $317,290; in 
1865, $306,002. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Walter D. Nichols, John C. 
Crane, Benjamin Luther; in 1862 and 1863, Simeon Briggs, 
Walter D. Nichols, William Babbitt; in 1863 and 1865, Wal- 
ter D. Nichols, William Babbitt, Thomas C. Dean. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Ephraim 
French ; in 1864 and 1865, Daniel S. Briggs. The town- 
treasurer during all these years was Abiel B. Crane. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 30th of April ; at which 
it was decided to sustain at all hazards the institutions of this 
nation ; and, as an evidence of this determination, it was voted 
to make up the pay of all volunteers in the military service 
from that town, and to all who might afterwards enlist in the 
same, to a sum sufficient to make the monthly pay of each twenty- 
six dollars, to continue to be paid while in the service ; also, 
to pay to each a bounty of fifteen dollars, and to furnish him 
with a uniform, not to exceed in value ten dollars. 

1862. July 21, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars ''to any person who may enlist within thirty days" 
for the term of three years, when mustered into the military 
service and credited to the quota of the town. The treasurer 
was authorized to borrow eleven hundred dollars for the pay- 
ment of the same. The following resolution was unanimously 
adopted : — 

Resolved, That we have confidence in the Govemraent of the 
United States, and we are of opinion that it should prosecute the war 
in the most vigorous manner, by making use of all justifiable means 
which God has placed iti its hands to put down this wicked rebellion. 

August 13th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dol- 
lars " to the next five men who shall enlist and be accepted," 
and a bounty of one hundred dollars "to all others who may 
afterwards enlist to fill the quota of the town." The treasurer 
was directed to borrow thirteen hundred dollars to pay the same. 
Another meeting was held on the 30th of August, to take 



BERKLEY. 123 

means to fill the quota of the town upon the call of the Presi- 
dent for three hundred thousand men for nine months' service. 
The treasurer was authorized to borrow eight hundred dollars. 

1863. July 27th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
five hundred dollars for the payment of State aid to the families 
of volunteers. 

1864. April 2d, Voted, to raise two thousand dollars to 
refund to citizens money which they had subscribed and paid 
to aid recruiting and to fill the quotas of the town. The 
assessors were directed to assess a tax for that purpose. The 
treasurer was authorized to borrow eight hundred dollars '* to 
complete the quota of the town under the last call of the Presi- 
dent for more men." June 25th, The bounty to each volunteer 
who should enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota 
of the town, was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 
The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not exceeding twenty- 
five hundred dollars, to pay the same. August 3d, Voted, to 
borrow an additional sum of twenty-five hundred dollars for the 
payment of bounties. 

1865. At a special meeting held on the 19th of June, the 
town voted to refund the money which had been contributed by 
individual citizens to encourage recruiting ; and, "the war being 
over," voted that the sum be raised by direct taxation. 

The selectmen in 1866 reported that Berkley had furnished 
sixty-eight men for the war ; but as the town furnished its quota 
upon every call of the President, and at the end of the war had 
a surplus of six over and above all demands, the number fur- 
nished was probably about eighty-three. One was a commis- 
sioned oflficer. The whole amount of money appropriated and 
expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was ten thousand six hundred and seventy-five dollars and 
fifty-nine cents ($10,675.59). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' fam- 
ilies, and which was refunded by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $287.14; in 1862, $981.50; in 1863, 
$1,191.43; in 1864, $938.66; in 1865, $434.18. Total 
amount in four years, $3,832.91. 




124 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The ladies of Berkley made generous contributions to the 
soldiers during the war. The exact amount of these contribu- 
tions we have not been able to ascertain : we know, however, 
that they realized upwards of one hundred dollars at one time, 
by means of a " Soldiers' Fair*' held by them. 

Dartmouth. — Incorporated June 8, 1664. Population 
in 1860, 3,883 ; in 1865, 3,434. Valuation in 1860, $2,948,- 
785 ; in 1865, $2,434,270. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Jireh Sherman, Abraham C. 
White, John W. Baker ; in 1862, Jireh Sherman, Calvin K. 
Turner, 2d, Richard Lapham; in 1863, Jireh Sherman, Rich- 
ard Lapham, Loring Ashley; in 1864 and 1865, Jireh Sher- 
man, Calvin K. Turner, 2d, Richard Lapham. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years 
was William Barker, Jr. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 16th of May ; at which the 
following preamble and resolutions were read, and unanimously 
adopted : — 

Whereas the Government of the United States is now engaged in a 
struggle for national existence, popular liberty, the perpetuity of the 
Constitution, and the supremacy of the laws against the myrmidons of 
slavery, and the enemies of popular liberty, therefore — 

Resolved^ That as patriots, and friends of the Constitution and the 
National Government and our righteous institutions, we, the people of 
Dartmouth, in town-meeting assembled, do recognize to the full extent 
the perilous position of our once happy, but now belligerent and dis- 
tracted country, and also the duty which we owe to that Constitution 
and flag under which we have lived in happiness and prosperity for 
more than eighty years ; and that we proffer unreservedly, and with 
cheerfulness, our aid and co-operation in defence of our liberties and 
national flag. 

1862. July 21st, A committee appointed for the purpose 
reported as follows : " That the selectmen name a committee of 
two to serve with themselves as a committee of five, to raise a 
number of volunteers, not exceeding twenty-seven, without 
regard to territory or sum of money, and the treasurer be 



DIGHTON. 125 

authorized to pay the bills." This report was adopted, and 
remained in force until afler the passage of the act in 1864 
restricting towns in the payment of bounties ; when the town 
voted tliat the selectmen should only pay one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years' service, 
which rule continued until the end of the war. 

The selectmen of Dartmouth reported in 1866 that the 
town had furnished three hundred and fifty-five men for 
the war, which was very nearly the exact number ; but as the 
town had a surplus of thirty-eight at the end of the war, after 
having filled its quota upon every call of the President, the 
number of men furnished must have been at least three hun- 
dred, and seventy. Three were commissioned oflicers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was forty 
thousand five hundred and seventy-one dollars and twenty-nine 
cents ($40,571.29). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
the four years of the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, 
and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $103.56; in 1862, $1,758.72; in 1863, $3,398.90; 
in 1864, $2,385,83 ; in 1865, $1,700.00. Total amount in five 
years, $9,347.01. 

We have been unable to get a satisfactory statement, one 
that would do justice to the ladies of Dartmouth for their good 
works during the war ; but we have a general statement, which 
ia highly honorable to them. 

DiGHTON. — Incorporated May 30, 1712. Population in 
1860, 1,733; in 1865, 1,815. Valuation in 1860, $711,454; 
in 1865, $776,779. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Jeremiah P. Edson, Zebina 
Wilmarth, Oliver P. Simmons ; in 1862, Oliver P. Simmons, 
George F. Garitt, Nathan Walker; in 1863, George E. 
Gooding, Weston Earle, Charles H. Gooding ; in 1864, Jere- 
miah P. Edson, Noah Chace, James H. Codding; in 1865, 
Jeremiah P. Edson, Noah Chace, Allen Talbot. 

The town-clerk during all these years was William Wood. 




126 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Noah 
Chace : in 1865, Oliver P. Simmons. 

1861. A day or two after the President issued his first call 
for troops, in April, 1861, a meeting of the citizens of Digh- 
ton was held, and initiatory steps were taken to form a military 
company ; and a petition was signed, requesting the selectmen to 
call an informal town-meeting, to be followed by a legal meet- 
ing, " as soon as the proper notice could be given." At the in- 
formal meeting, " patriotic and stirring speeches were made by 
several of our ministers and a num'ber of citizens ; and a com- 
mittee was chosen to present a series of resolutions at the coming 
town-meeting. The greatest enthusiasm prevailed throughout 
the town, and flag-staffs were erected in many quarters." At 
the legal town-meeting held April 29th, the committee presented 
a preamble and resolutions, which were unanimously adopted. 
The resolutions were: 1st, "We, the citizens of Dighton, do 
hereby pledge to Liberty and our country our property, our 
lives, and our sacred honor, and will give our united and hearty 
support to the Government of the United States, and will hold 
ourselves in readiness to contribute according to our means, for 
the defence of our common country, against the dangers now 
impending over us." 2d, That we will encourage enlistments of 
volunteers ; and, whenever they shall be called into service, "it 
is incumbent on us to see that the families dependent on them 
for support are well provided for." 3d, " That we will make 
ample provision for all expenses necessarily incurred in drilling, 
equipping, and uniforming the volunteers from this town." It 
was also voted to give to each volunteer fifteen dollars a month 
while in service, a uniform, "and a first-rate revolver, if its use 
will be permitted by the commanding officer ; " also, to give 
three dollars a week to each person who will drill " one hour on 
three several days of each week for three months." The adjoin- 
ing towns of Somerset and Berkley were invited to join with 
Dighton in raising a military company. Three thousand dollars 
were appropriated for war purposes. August 10th, Voted, to 
pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the 
act of the Legislature. 

1862. July 9th, Voted, to pay each volunteer a bounty of 



E ASTON. 127 

one hundred dollars. August 19th, The bounty was increased 
to three hundred and twenty-five dollars to three-years volun- 
teers ; and on August 28th it was voted to pay a bounty of two 
hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' service. 

1863. August 29th, Voted, to pay aid to the families of 
drafted men. September 23d, Voted, to assess a tax to refund 
to citizens the money they had individually paid for recruiting 
purposes, and which amounted in the aggregate to sixty-three 
hundred dollars. 

1864. March 28th, Voted, to raise by taxation a sufficient 
amount of money to repay to citizens money advanced by 
them for recruiting purposes, " not exceeding one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars for each man enlisted." On the 9th of April 
a town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to raise an 
amount not exceeding one hundred and twenty-five dollars, for 
bounty to each volunteer who should enlist for three years and 
be credited to the quota of the town, under the recent call of 
the President for more troops. 

The selectmen in 1866 reported that the town had furnished 
one hundred and ninety-four men for the war, which was doubt- 
less the exact number which the town did furnish. It filled its 
full quota upon every call made by the President for men, and 
at the end of the war had a surplus of twelve over and above 
all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-one thou- 
sand four hundred and eleven dollars and fifty-three cents 
($31,411.53). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for State aid to the fiimilies of 
soldiers, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $457.83; in 1862, $1,391.43; in 1863, 
$1,713.00; in 1864, $1,893.12; in 1865, $1,167.24. Total 
amoimt in four years, $6,622.62. 

Easton. — Incorporated Dec. 21, 1725. Population in 
1860, 3,067; in 1865, 3,087. Valuation in 1860, $1,064,- 
221; in 1865, $1,930,900. 



128 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The selectmen during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, 
and 1865, were John Kimball, Horace D. Howard, Joseph 
Barrows. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during the same period 
was John Kimball. 

1861. Under the first call of the President for militia for 
three months' service, April 14, 1861, Company B, of the 
Fourth Regiment Massachusetts Militia, which belonged to 
Easton, was ordered to join the Regiment ; and with it imme- 
diately left the State for Fortress Monroe, at which place it 
arrived on the morning of the 20th of April, being the first 
loyal regiment which reached Virginia in the war. 

The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to 
the war, was held on the 29th of April, at which it was voted 
to pay to each inhabitant (except commissioned ofiicers) of 
Easton, when called into the military service of the country, 
fifteen dollars as a gift, ** and fifteen dollars a month for each 
month he shall remain in said service." A committee was ap- 
pointed with authority to pay aid to the soldiers' families resid- 
ing in Easton, "at their discretion." July 11th, The town 
voted to raise by taxation three thousand dollars, to defray any 
expense already incurred, and to fulfil any contract heretofore 
made with any of its inhabitants, who, as members of the Vol- 
unteer Militia, may have been, or may hereafter be, mustered into 
the service of the United States. Three thousand dollars were 
also appropriated for the payment of State aid to the soldiers* 
families, as provided by the law of the Commonwealth. 

1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay to each volunteer who shall 
enlist for three years' service, and be credited to the quota of the 
town, a bounty of one hundred dollars, "in addition to the pay 
and bounty of the Government." The following resolutions 
were read at the meeting, and adopted : — 

Resolved^ That the brilliant successes that have attended our efforts 
in crushing out this wicked rebellion inspire our hearts with gratitude, 
and nerve our hands to strike heavier blows for the triumph of Free- 
dom. 

Resolved, That we heartily respond to the call of the President for 
volunteers, believing that au overwhelming force, now put into the 



E ASTON, 129 

field, will make short work with the Rebellion, cover our army with 
glory, and make our Republic the strongest, as well as the freest, 
government of the world. 

Resolved^ That we, the inhabitants of Easton, deeply sensible of the 
importance of a speedy compliance with the President's late call, 
although we have already made heavy contributions to the army, yet 
we will spare no efforts to place our quota promptly in the field. 

Resolved^ That the preservation of the Union and the Constitution, 
and the crisis of the hour, call upon us to sacrifice, with a military 
heart, our lives and our fortunes upon the altar of our country. 

August 11th, Voted, to pay to each volunteer for three years' 
service seventy-five dollars, in addition to the one hundred dol- 
lars already voted to be paid. August 19th, Voted, to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for 
nine months' service who enlists and is credited to the quota of 
the town. December 6th, The bounty was raised to two hun- 
dred dollars to each volunteer, to fill the quota of the town, 
^ whether he is an inhabitant of the town of Easton or other- 
wise. 

1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the 
town, in its corporate capacity, to fill its quota of volunteers 
during this year. 

1864. April 18th, The town voted to refund to the con- 
tributors three-fourths of the money paid by them to assist in 
filling the quotas of the town, of volunteers for military service, 
under the calls of the President of October, 1863, and February, 
1864 ; also, to raise by taxation ten thousand dollars for 
recruiting expenses, and the payment of bounties to volunteers 
to fill the quota of Easton, under the recent calls of the Presi- 
dent for more men.. July 26th, Voted, to raise money by tax- 
ation, and to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dol- 
lars to each volunteer who shall enlist to fill the quota of the 
town, under the call of the President dated July 18, 1864. 

1865. June 17th, Voted, to refund all money contributed 
by individuals during 1864, in aid of recruiting men to fill the 
quota of the town, provided the claim shall be presented in 
vrriting to the selectmen before the first day of January next ; 

9 




130 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

and persons who have served one year in the military service 
shall not be taxed to pay any part of said amounts. 

The selectmen of Easton reported in 1866 that the town had 
furnished three hundred and thirty-four men for the war,* which 
is more than the number that was required of it. The surplus 
of men at the end of the war, after the town had filled its quota 
upon every call made by the President, was thirty-four. Four- 
teen were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was forty thousand five hundred and three 
dollars ($40,503.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' fam- 
ilies, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $2,052.53; in 1862, $5,947.40; in 
1863, $4,905.56 ; in 1864, $4,800.00 ; in 1865, $2,800.00. 
Total amount in four years, $20,505.59. 

"The ladies of Easton deserve* honorable mention, and great 
credit, for important and valuable services rendered to their 
country in the time of its great peril, not merely by their in- 
tense patriotism, but by their labors. They organized societies 
and circles for preparing lint, garments, and many other things 
necessary for the comfort of the sick and wounded. They were 
ingenious and indefatigable in their efforts to find ways and 
means to aid the cause, and mitigate the inevitable evils of war. 
Their contributions amounted to a very large sum.^ 

Fairhaven. — Incorporated Feb. 22, 1812. Population in 
1860, 3,118 ; in 1865, 2,548. Valuation in 1860, $3,596,609 ; 
in 1865, $1,778,217. t 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Rodolphus W. Dexter, 

Jonathan Co wen, Bartholomew Taber ; in 1863, Bartholomew 
Taber, Jonathan Cowen, George H. Taber; in 1864, Bar- 

* Forty-six of whom died in the service. 

t This large falling off of the valuation during these five years is to be ac- 
counted for by the danger to which whaling vessels were exposed during the 
war, in which business the citizens of Fairhaven were chiefly interested. 



FAIRHAVEN. 131 

tholomew Taber, Edwin R. Alray, Ellery T. Taber; in 1865, 
Bartholomew Taber, Isaiah West, Frederick Taber. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was Tucker Damon, Jr. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
connected with the war, was held on the 4th of May ; at which 
the selectmen were authorized to raise five thousand dollars to 
projierly equip a guard for the protection of the harbor and 
coast, and to pay each volunteer who shall enlist from that 
town into the military service of the United States a sufficient 
sum to make his pay twenty-five dollars a month, " exclusive of 
rations." B. Ewer, Jr., John A. Hawes, and I. F. Ferry 
were appointed a committee to obtain from the Commonwealth 
arms and equipments for coast and harbor defence. July 20th, 
The selectmen were authorized to borrow five thousand dollars to 
defray any expenses incurred, or which may be incurred, for the 
organization and maintenance of an armed police to guard against 
an attack from sea ; said police to be discontinued whenever the 
selectmen of Fairhaven and the mayor and aldermen of New 
Bedford shall deem it advisable. September 21st, The select- 
men were authorized to borrow fifteen hundred dollars for the 
benefit of a military company to be raised in the town, and to 
pay each member fifteen dollars when mustered into the service. 

1862. April 7th, The selectmen were directed to continue 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. July 
19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each 
volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited 
to the quota of the town ; and the selectmen were given full 
power to act in raising the men. August 23d, The bounty to 
three-years volunteers was increased fifty dollars, and the bounty 
to nine-months men was fixed at one hundred dollars. Arthur 
Cox, William H. Whitfield, George Atwood, Horace Scott, 
and Isaac Ferry were chosen to aid the selectmen in enlisting 
men. 

1863. April 6tb, An appropriation was made for State aid 
to soldiers' families for the year. 

1864. April — , The selectmen were authorized to pay such 
bounties as they might think proper to volunteers enlisting to 



132 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

fill the quota of the town, provided that not more than one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars be paid to each person ; and to 
each citizen or resident of the town who enlisted since Oct. 
17, 1863, "who had received a less sum than others," be paid 
seventy-five dollars. July 30th, The selectmen were authorized 
to borrow five thousand three hundred and seventy-five dollars 
to recruit the quota of the town under the recent call of the 
President for five hundred thousand men. 

1865. April 3d, The payment of State aid to the families 
of volunteers was continued for the year; and the selectmen 
were directed to continue to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three 
years to the credit of the town, and so continued to the end of 
the war. 

The selectmen reported in 1866 that the town had furnished 
two hundred and fifty-seven men for the war ; but it must have 
furnished about three hundred, as it filled each of its quotas, and 
at the end of the war had a surplus of seventeen over and above 
all demands. Ten were commissioned oflScers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-one thou- 
sand four hundred and eleven dollars and fifty-three cents 
($31,411.53). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 
soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $49.56; in 1862, $1,555.75; in 
1863, $2,784.39; in 1864, $2,703.27; in 1865, $1,700.00. 
Total in four years, $8,792.97. 

The ladies of Fairhaven held several fairs during the war to 
raise money for the benefit of the soldiers. Several were also 
held by the young misses and the children for the same good 
purpose. The whole amount raised by them was about ten 
thousand dollars, most of which was expended in the purchase 
of material for under-clothing and hospital stores, which were 
forwarded weekly to the Sanitary Commission. 

In 1867 the town appropriated seventeen hundred dollars to 
erect a suitable monument to commemorate the services and 



FALL RIVER, 133 

sacrifices of the soldiers and sailors of Fairhaven who had died 
in the service during the war. 

Fall River. — Incorporated as a town Feb. 26, 1803; 
as a city, April 12, 1854. Population in 1860, 14,026 ; in 
1865, 17,525. Valuation in 1860, $10,923,746; in 1865, 
$12,632,419. 

The mayor of the city in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, 
was Edward P. Buffinton. The aldermen were as follows : In 
1861, George W. Eddy, Nathaniel B. Borden, Asa Petty, Jr., 
John Mason, Jr., James Ford, Job B. Ashbury ; in 1862, Joseph 
Borden, Nathaniel B. Borden, Asa Petty, Jr., John Mason, 
Jr., James Ford, Job B. Ashbury; in 1863, Samuel Hatha- 
way, Joseph Borden, Nathaniel B. Borden, Benjamin Covel, 
Charles O. Shove, Walter Paine, 3d ; in 1864, Weaver Osborn, 
Joshua Kemington, Nathaniel B. Borden, Daniel Still well, 
Walter Paine, 3d, Philip D. Borden; in 1865, James Henry, 
Joshua Remington, Nathaniel B. Borden, Daniel Still well, 
Walter Paine, 3d, Philip D. Borden. 

The city-clerk and city-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, 
was Alvan S. Ballard; in 1864 and 1865, George A. Ballard. 

1861. A citizens' meeting was held on the 19th of April, 
Hon. Nathaniel B. Borden chairman ; at which it was voted, 
" that the Government of the Union shall be preserved." The 
city government was requested to appropriate ten thousand 
dollars to provide outfits for volunteers and support for their 
families ; and also to pay each volunteer, or his family, twenty 
dollars a month, in addition to Government pay. April 24th, 
The committee of the city council, to whom the above resolu- 
tions were referred, reported as follows : — 

Whereas, in the Southern section of our country public law is disre- 
garded, the authority of the United States set at defiance, and armed 
forces have been, and are, organizing, with the avowed purpose of over- 
throwing the Government as formed by our Revolutionary Fathers, and 
of establishing a new government, in which freedom of the press, of 
speech, and of the individual man, shall be more restricted, — in a 
word, a government for the perpetuation of slavery ; and — 

Whereas, for the repelling of such forces, the standing army being 




134 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

inadequate, the President of the United States has made requisition 
on the several States for militia ; therefore, to the end that said requi- 
sition may he more readily answered, — 

Ordered^ That to each of our citizens, who may join a militia com- 
pany of our city, organized according to law, pledged to render mili- 
tary service, whenever and wherever required, whether by authority 
of the State or the United-States Government, there be paid from the 
city treasury the sum of fifteen dollars for outfit, when such company 
shall be mustered into service, and thereafter, for a term not exceeding 
three months, fifteen dollars a month, the latter to be applied for sup- 
port of the family or dependants, as the soldier may direct ; and if, at 
the expiration of the service, a balance, or the whole, shall remain un- 
paid, then payment to be made to the soldier in person [or his legal 
representatives] ; these payments to be in addition to compensation 
that may be realized from the United-States Government. 

These were adopted, and ten thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated in accordance therewith. April 29th, The mayor was re- 
quested to apply to the State authorities to furnish two hundred 
muskets for two companies organized in the city. Uniforms for 
the militia were paid for by the city. Bailey H. Borden sent his 
check to the mayor for one hundred dollars for the benefit of 
volunteers. June 5th, Twelve dollars were voted to each volun- 
teer of a new company " not wanted at this time." September 
10th, A bounty of fifteen dollars was authorized to be paid 
each volunteer "who shall join the new company." 

1862. May 28th, "Voted, that as a mark of respect to the 
memory of the first Fall-River soldier who has fallen in the 
present struggle for the maintenance of our liberties, that we 
attend the funeral of the late Nathaniel S. Gerry, a private 
of Company A, Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, in 
a body." June 30th, A similar vote was passed in regard to 
the death of Lieutenant Jesse D. Bullock, the first Fall-River 
oflScer who had fallen in the war.* The President of the 
United States having called for three hundred thousand more 
men, a public meeting was held July 11th ; at which it was 



♦ Lieutenant Bullock belonged to the Seventh Regiment Massacliiisetts 
Volunteers, and died June 25, 18C2, of wounds received at the battle of Fair 
Oaks, Va. 



FALL RIVER. 135 

recommended to pay each volunteer for three years' service 
a bounty of one hundred dollars. The following resolution, 
among others, was adopted : — 

Resolved^ That our old men contribute of their substance, and our 
healthy young men tender their services ; remembering that, if in an- 
cient times ** for a good man some would even dare to die," surely for 
the necessary support of a righteous cause there should be no hesi- 
tancy because life would be attended with hazard. 

July 12th, The resolutions of the citizens' meeting were 
adopted by the city government, and the mayor was directed 
to make arrangements for enlisting men. Another citizens' 
meeting was held on the 14th of August, at which it was 
resolved, that the patriotism of Massachusetts will sustain the 
Government in putting down this Rebellion at any cost of men 
and money. It was also voted to raise, by subscription, money 
sufficient to*add one hundred dollars to each volunteer's bounty. 
A resolution was passed to aid the Rev. Elihu Grant to raise a 
military company for active service. September 1st, The city 
government voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to 
each volunteer for nine months' service, when credited to the 
quota of the city ; and forty-five thousand dollars were appro- 
priated to pay the same. 

The following letter, addressed to the mayor, was read, and 
a vote of thanks to the writer was passed : — 

New Orleans, La., Sept. 21, 1862. 
My dear Sir, — I shipped to your address yesterday a small can- 
non that was captured in this State by a detachment of Company G. 
Twenty-sixth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, from your city, and 
to whom General Butler gave it as a mark of his appreciation of their 
conduct ; and they now turn it over to the city of Fall River as a trophy 
from rebeldom. And as the rebel Jackson is now on his way to Bun- 
ker Hill, he may possibly come by the Bay-State line. In that event, 
you will blow him to pieces with it, if he dares to set his foot on Mas- 
sachusetts soil. 

Respectfully yours, 

James Brady, Jr., Lt. Co. G, 26th Reg. 

1863. March 2d, The mayor was directed to carry into 
effect the act of the Legislature in relation to the payment of 



136 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBEIXIOI 

State nid to soldiers' famities. November IGtV 
of the city hall was granted to Mra. Kichard R 
Mary A. Brayton " for the purpose of lectures, 
the proceeds to be given to the soldiers." I 
A lot in Oak-Grove Cemetery, directly in front < 
was set apart as a soldiers' burial-place.* 

1U64. February 20th, A committee was ap^^ 
arrangements for the reception of Company C 
Keglment. Two thousand dolliirs were appro 
expenses attending enlistment services." } 
bounty to volunteers for three years' service w 
hundred and twenty-five dollars. June 8tli, J 
appointed to make arrangements for the recepti' 
"A" and "B" of the Seventh Ilegiment Ma 
untecrs. 

1865. May 17th, It was voted as follows : 

WhfTeat the President of the United States hn 
recommended the oleervance of tlie first day of 
mourning, in consequence of the death of our late bf 
Chief Magistrate, Abiiaham Lincoln; therefore — 

Ordered, That we do take measures for an appi 
of the day as recommended by the I'reaident, and i 
appointed to procure nn orator for llie owaaion, i- 
arrangements ; and the sum of one hundred dolla 
priated. 

Fall Giver furnished eighteen hundred and 
the war, which was a surplus of twenty-om. 
all denmnds. Thirty-seven were commissioi 
whole amount of money appropriated and ex[ 
on account of the war, exclusive of State aid 
and seven thousand eight hundred and twenty 
three cenu ($107,828,03). 

The amount of money raised and expendc 
ing the four years of the war for State aid ti 
and which was repaid by the Comnionwealt) 
In 1861, 17,262.25: io 1862, $29,771.67 

■ Colonel RiclinnI Bc)r<len lias crcc:(c<l a eplcndid ni: 
lot, with tablets and military emblems. 



FREETOWN. 137 

476.10; in 1864, $34,000.00; in 1865, $20,000.00. Total 
amount in four years, $127,510.02. 

The ladies of Fall River in April, 1861, formed a ^ Soldiers' 
Aid Society," which held its first meeting for work on the 1st 
of May. For six weeks they met daily, and worked from 
morning until evening. After that, they usually met for the 
same purpose one afternoon in each week. Many other meet- 
ings were held for work and consultation : several ladies did 
their work for the society at their own dwellings. The society 
retained its organization, and continued its Christian and patri- 
otic labors from April, 1861, to July 28, 1865; during the 
whole of which time Mrs. Richard Borden was president, 
" whose ceaseless devotion " to the interests of soldiers merits 
their warmest acknowledgments, as does also the services of 
Mrs. Ames, first vice-president, Mrs. William Munday, Mrs. 
Mary Durfee, Mrs. Arnold, and Miss Caroline Borden, the 
secretary and treasurer of the society. The society received 
during the period of its existence $3,347.76 in cash, which 
was properly expended for materials to be made up for the use 
of the soldiers. Among the articles furnished were 200 sol- 
diers' uniforms, 231 bed-sacks, 131 bed-quilts, 365 bed-com- 
forters, 87 blankets, 355 sheets, 262 pillows, 307 pillow-cases, 
167 cushions for wounds, 90 dressing-gowns, 380 cotton shirts, 
292 flannel do., 284 shirts, 209 drawers, 1,164 pairs woollen 
socks, 1,365 handkerchiefs, 2,246 towels, 5,589 yards, 323 
rolls, 1 box and 4 bundles of bandages, 127 boxes of lint ; and 
a great number and variety of other articles, including pin- 
cushions, wines, jellies, pictures, newspapers, books, dried 
apples, &c. These articles were generally sent to the front 
through the agents of the Sanitary and Christian Commis- 
sions. A large number of valuable donations were sent to 
Portsmouth Grove Hospital, in Rhode Island, including a 
Thanksgiving dinner. At the close of the war, in testimony of 
her valuable services in behalf of the soldiers, Mrs. Richard 
Borden, the president of the society, was presented with a hand- 
some silver goblet. 

Freetown. — Incorporated July 21, 1683. Population in 




138 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1860, 1,521 ; in 1865, 1,484. Valuation in 1860, $802,214; 
in 1865, $706,117. 

The selectmen in 1861 were John D. Wilson, James Prec- 
ket, Paul M. Barnes; in 1862, John D. Wilson, Granville S. 
Allen, Edmund D. Hathaway ; in 1863, John D. Wilson, 
Edmund D. Hathaway, Elijah D. Chase ; in 1864, John D. 
Wilson, Elijah D. Chase, John W. Peabody; in 1865, John 
D. Wilson, Ruel Washburn, Philip Evans. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Silas P. Richmond; 
in 1863, George W. Hall; in 1864 and 1865, Don. C. H. 
Hathaway. The town-treasurer in 1861 was John D. Wilson ; 
in 1862, 1863, and 1864, James Burr; in 1865, Guilford 
Hathaway. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
connected with the war, was held on the 9th of May, at which 
one thousand dollars were appropriated to assist the families of 
volunteers living in the town ; and John H. Macomber, Thomas 
Leeburn, and James W. Hathaway were appointed to disburse 
the same in an equitable and proper manner. 

1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years' mili- 
tary service, and be mustered in to fill the quota of the town. 
The selectmen were authorized to borrow the money to pay the 
same ; and Marcus M. Rounsville and David B. Hill were 
chosen "to attend to the business of recruiting." August 7th, 
The bounty was increased to two hundred dollars, provided the 
quota of the town is filled by the 15th of the month. F. A. 
Cleveland, Granville S. Allen, Bradford W. Clark, and James 
H. Hathaway were added to the recruiting committee. August 
22d, The town voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to 
each volunteer who would enlist in the military service for nine 
months, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the 
town, said bounty to be paid only to those who are inhabitants 
of Freetown. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money 
to pay the same. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town in 
its corporate capacity in relation to the war, although recruiting 
and the payment of State aid to soldiers' families were continued 
as before. 



MANSFIELD. 139 

1864. On the 26th of March the town voted to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer who should enlist to fill the quota of the town, under 
the call of the President, issued Oct. 17, 1863, "excepting 
those who have already received a gratuity from individuals." 
The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay 
bounties. 

Freetown, according to the return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished one hundred and eighteen men for the war ; but 
the real number was about one hundred and fifty, as it had a 
surplus of four at the end of the war, after having filled its 
quota upon every call made by the President for men. Eleven 
were commissioned officers, one of whom was Ebenezer W. 
Pierce, Esq., who lost an arm in 1862 before Richmond, and 
was made a brigadier- general of volunteers by President Lin- 
coln. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended 
by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was 
sixteen thousand and sixty-one dollars ($16,061.00). 

The whole amount of money raised and expended by the 
town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' 
families, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $449.45; in 1862, $2,978.62; in 1863, 
$3,524.34; in 1864, $3,167.48; in 1865, $2,200.00. Total 
amount in four years, $12,319.89. 

Mansfield. — Incorporated April 26, 1T76. Population in 
1860, 2,114; in 1865, 2,131. Valuation in 1860, $711,080; 
in 1865, $750,442. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William B. Bates, Elbridge 
Sweet, Hiram H. White ; in 1862 and 1863, William B. Bates, 
Elbridge Sweet, James W. White ; in 1864, William B. Bates, 
Elbridge Sweet, William Robinson; in 1865, Elbridge Sweet, 
William Robinson, E. Copeland. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years 
was E. M. Reed. 

1861. April 29th, Five thousand, dollars were appropriated 
to pay each inhabitant of the town, " when called into service," 
fifteen dollars, and fifteen dollars a month while in the service ; 



140 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

also, to furnish one outfit for each man. James W. White, 
William Robinson, William C. Bessom, Daniel W. Dean, and 
Nathaniel Whitmore were appointed to have charge of the 
appropriation, and to carry out the votes of the town. July 
29th, What remained of the five thousand dollars was appro- 
priated to pay State aid to the families of soldiers. 

1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers during the 
year. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
seventy-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three 
years, and be credited to the quota of the town. Hon. John 
Rogers offered to give each man twenty-five dollars in addition. 
August 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to 
each volunteer for nine months' service. Committees were 
chosen to enlist the men. 

1863. March 2d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. July 23d, 
" Voted, that the treasurer borrow such sums of money as will 
be sufficient to procure thirty men as substitutes for those men 
who have been drafted from this town ; such sums not to ejtceed, 
in the aggregate, ten thousand dollars." 

1864. February f3th, The selectmen were directed to make 
an equitable apportionment among the citizens of the town upon 
the property and polls, for the sum of two thousand dollars 
to be expended in procuring volunteers. March 29th, The treas- 
urer was authorized to borrow $5,125, to pay the expense of 
filling the quota of the town under the pending call of the 
President for five hundred thousand men. June 17th, The 
selectmen were directed to borrow, not exceeding ten thousand 
dollars, '* for procuring volunteers from time to time, as they 
may be called for." December 12th, Voted, to assess a tax upon 
the property and polls of the town '* sufficient to pay for the 
town's quota, under the next call of the President." 

1865. October 16th, A sum not to exceed five thousand 
dollars was appropriated to reimburse citizens for money ex- 
pended by them in procuring volunteers in the year 1864. 

Mansfield, according to the return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished two hundred and forty men for the war ; which 



NEW BEDFORD. 141 

was the true number, and was a surplus of seventeen over and 
above all demands. Thirteen were commissioned officers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid» was thirty- 
five thousand two hundred and forty-two dollars and twenty-one 
cents ($35,242.21). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 
soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $1,101.33; in 1862, $2,980.89; in 
1863, $3,046.36; in 1864, $4,060.06; in 1865, $2,900.00. 
Total amount in four years, $14,098.64. 

New Bedford. — Incorporated as a town Feb. 23, 1787; 
as a city, March 9, 1847. Population in 1860, 22,300; in 
1865, 20,863. Valuation in 1860, $24,196,138; in 1865, 
$20,525,790.* 

In 1861, Isaac C. Taber, mayor; Warren Ladd, James L. 
Humphrey, Nathan Lewis, John P. Barker, Matthew Howland, 
William H. Reymond, aldermen. In 1862, Isaac C. Taber, 
mayor; Warren Ladd, B. Penniman, Jr., Nathan Lewis, John 
P. Barker, Matthew Howland, William H. Reymond, alder- 
men. In 1863, George Howland, Jr., mayor; Warren Ladd, 
George G. Gifford, Ambrose Vincent, John P. Barker, Mat- 
thew Howland, John H. Perry, aldermen. In 1864, George 
Howland, Jr., mayor; Warren Ladd, George G. Gifford, 
Ambrose Vincent, John P. Barker, Matthew Howland, John 
H. Perry, aldermen. In 1865, George Howland, Jr., mayor; 
Warren Ladd, George G. Gifford, Joseph Knowles, George F. 
Kingman, Matthew Howland, John H. Perry, aldermen. 

The city-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Sanford S. Horton ; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, Henry T. Leonard. The city-treasurer 
durin<]: all the vears of the war was James B. Con^rdon. 

1861. April 19th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated 
for the benefit of the "City Guards," to be expended under the 
direction of the mayor and a committee of the city council. 

* This great diminution in the valuation was tiie effect of the war upon 
the whaling interest. 



142 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for the formation of a 
Home and Coast Guard. The American flag was ordered to 
be displayed from the City Hall until otherwise ordered. July 
15th, A report was received, showing that Fort Phenix in Fair- 
haven, and Fort Taber in New Bedford, mounting eleven guns, 
had been manned by the Home Guard, and recommending an 
additional appropriation to maintain the same ; and on the 29th 
of July five thousand dollars were appropriated. September 5th, 
The mayor was authorized to organize one or more companies 
*' for the national army," the bounty to each member not to 
exceed fifteen dollars. November 20th, Fifteen hundred dollars 
were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. December 
15th, Five thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment 
of soldiers' bounties. 

1862. January 3d, A report was made that three companies 
of volunteers for three years' military service had been organ- 
ized. January 4th, This being the close of the municipal year, 
a report and resolution complimentary of the outgoing mayor, 
Hon. Isaac C. Taber, were unanimously adopted. July 10th, 
Seven thousand five hundred dollars were appropriated to establish 
a General Hospital for sick and wounded soldiers, provided the 
General Government should " decide to locate one in this city." 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volun- 
teer who enlists for three years' military service, to the credit of 
the city. Twenty-six thousand dollars were appropriated to pay 
the same. The use of the spacious City Alms House, capable 
of accommodating three hundred sick and wounded soldiers, was 
offered to the General Government, which ofier was respectfully 
declined. August 18th, The bounty to volunteers was increased 
to two hundred and fifty dollars ; and twenty thousand dollars 
were appropriated to pay the same. August 29th, Voted, to 
pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine 
months' service. Twenty-five thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated to pay said bounties. October 21st, A further appropria- 
tion of five thousand dollars was made for the Home and Coast 
Guard, and twenty thousand for military bounties, which on 
the 13th of December was increased by a loan of twenty-six 
thousand dollars. 



NEW BEDFORD. 143 

1863. February 26th, The city council adjourned "for the 
purpose of paying their respects to Governor Andrew and 
General \yool at the city hall." March 4th, State aid was 
directed to be paid to the families *' of colored citizens who shall 
be mustered into the service of the United States." April 9th, 
Five hundred dollars were authorized to be expended on the 
enlistment of a company of heavy artillery, which on the 21st 
of May was increased to one thousand dollars. July 15th, ''A 
watchman was discharged for using seditious language." July 
30th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families of drafted 
men. "Ordered, that the bells be rung and a salute fired on 
the day of the Public Thanksgiving on the 6th of August." 
September 24th, The treasurer was directed to pay the Treasurer 
of the Commonwealth $15,450.68, "under the laws in relation 
to the reimbursement of bounties." 

1864. November 17th, Voted, that the poll-taxes of the 
returned soldiers belonging to New Bedford be remitted. 

1865. January 7th, Appropriate resolutions were passed in 
regard to the death of Hon. Edward Everett, and Ex-Governor 
John H. Clifford was invited to deliver a eulogy on the life and 
character of the deceased. February 7th, The mayor recom- 
mended the ringing of the bells and the firing of one hundred guns 
in honor of President Lincoln signing the emancipation proclama- 
tion. April 10th, A committee was appointed to make arrange- 
ments to celebrate the fall of Richmond and the surrender of 
General Lee. April 15th, A message was received from the 
mayor making an official announcement of the death of Presi- 
dent Lincoln, and a committee was appointed to consider and 
^port upon the proper measures to be taken in regard to it. 
^ committee reported a series of appropriate resolutions, 
H^nich were adopted.* June 22d, Alderman GifFord presented 
^the council a rebel flag captured at Charleston, S.C., Feb. 
*8, 1865, and sent to him by Captain James W. Grace, of 
Company C, Fifty-fourth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers 
(colored). 



* These are belieyed to have been the first resolutions passed by any munic- 
^Pii bodj in regard to that terrible event. 



f.-.... 



144 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

New Bedford furnished about thirty-two hundred men for 
the war, which was a surplus of eleven hundred and ten men 
over and above all demands.* One hundred and twenty were 
officers in the military service. We do not know the num- 
ber who served in the navy. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was one hundred and seventy-seven thousand dollars 
($177,000.00). 

The amount of money appropriated and expended by the city 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 
volunteers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows: In 1861, $5,091.52; in 1862, $25,- 
257.29; in 1863, $40,146.04 ; in 1864, $36,500.00 ; in 1865, 
$18,500.00. Total amount in four years, $125,495.85. 

The Ladies' Soldiers' Relief Society donated for the relief of 
the soldiers upwards of twenty thousand dollars in money ; in 
cotton cloth and flannel, four thousand dollars ; and in hospital 
stores to the value of six thousand dollars. The following are 
some of the articles contributed : Condensed milk, preserved 
fruits, jellies and pickles, farina, maizena, tamarinds, lemons, 
dried apples, tea, coffee, cocoa; 1,116 bottles of wine, consisting 
of sherry, currant, blackberry, and native wines; 423 bottles 
of brandy ; 1,130 bottles of blackberry brandy and syrups ; 345 
bottles of port wine ; large contributions for the Thanksgiving 
dinner and Christmas trees at Portsmouth Grove Hospital, be- 
sides bushels of lint and bandages. "The Society for the Com- 
fort and Relief of our Soldiers in Hospitals" furnished, among 
other things, 5,904 flannel and cotton shirts, 3,887 pairs of 
drawers, 4,573 woollen socks, 1,790 towels, 94 coats, 76 vests, 
120 collars, 1,000 handkerchiefs, 368 cravats, 314 dressing- 
gowns, 1,836 pocket-handkerchiefs, 300 pants, 148 napkins, 
678 pairs slippers, 265 woollen mittens, 542 blankets, 515 
sheets, 673 pillows, 750 quilts, 988 canes, 1,280 woollen 
under-shirts, &c. 

The contributions named above are certainly remarkable, but 



* Tliis large surplus is in a certain degree owing to the act of Congress passed 
in July, 18G4, allowing credits for men serving in the United-States navy. 



NORTON. 145 

we have to add that the ladies of New Bedford began early in 
the war. They held a meeting on the 18th of April, 18(51, and 
organized for the work. Mrs. Joseph C. Delano was chosen 
president, Mrs. Lawrence Grinnel vice-president, and Mrs. 
William Eddy secretary and treasurer. In addition to the 
above contributions, five hundred dollars were given by a lady to 
pay soldiers' wives for sewing. They also sent contributions to 
the St. Louis and Baltimore Soldiers' Fairs, and furnished tables 
at the New York and Boston Fairs. 

Norton. — Incorporated June 12, 1777. Population in 
1860, 1,848 ; in 1865, 1,709. Valuation in 1860, $818,451 ; 
in 1865, $842,527. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Augustus Lane, 
"William D. Wetherill, Horatio Bates; in 1863, William 
D. Wetherill, Horatio Bates, Benjamin E. Sweet; in 1864 
and 1865, William D. Wetherill, Horatio Bates, Charles 
Sprague, Jr. 

The town-clerk and the town-treasurer during all of these 
years was Austin Messenger. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 4th of May, at which it 
was voted " that the town furnish each soldier who may enter 
the service of the country from Norton with a uniform, not 
to exceed ten dollars in cost ; and that each soldier who has 
entered the service of the country, and who shall hereafter 
enter it from the town of Norton, shall receive fifteen dollars 
as a bounty ; and a sum per month, in addition to what he may 
receive from the General Government or from the State, suffi- 
cient to make his pay twenty-six dollars per month, to be paid 
monthly." 

1862. At a regular meeting held on the 7th of April, the 
town voted to appropriate whatever money was necessary for 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers residing 
in Norton, said payments to be made by the selectmen, "and in 
accordance with a law of the Commonwealth." Another town- 
meeting was held on the 29th of July, at which it was voted 

" to pay two hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist 

10 



146 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

into the service of the country in this town within ten days, 
to be paid when properly mustered in and credited, the number 
not to exceed twenty-two." On the 23d of August the town 
voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each 
volunteer for nine months' service, who is credited to the quota 
of the town. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year, 
although recruiting went on, and the payment of State aid to 
the soldiers' families continued as before. 

1864. At the regular yearly meeting held April 4th, the 
town voted '' to raise twenty-six hundred and twenty-five dol- 
lars by taxation, for the purpose of procuring the quota of 
volunteers called for from the town of Norton by the Presi- 
dent Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864, and for paying and re- 
funding money which has already been paid and contributed in 
aid of and for the above purpose." Another meeting was held 
on the 11th of June, when it was voted *'to raise fifteen hun- 
dred dollars for the purpose of paying for the town's quota 
called for by the President March 4, 1864. 

1865. The war being over, a special town-meeting was 
held June 24th, at which it was voted " to raise by taxation 
four thousand dollars for paying and refunding money contrib- 
uted by individuals in aid of and for the purpose of filling the 
quota of the town of Norton under any requisition, order, or 
call of the President or War Department of the United States 
during the year 1864." 

Norton furnished, according to the return made by the select- 
men in 1866, one hundred and eighty-one men for the war, 
which we believe to have been the exact number, as at the end 
of the contest Norton had a surplus of twenty-five over and 
above all demands. Two were commissioned ofiScers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty- 
three thousand one hundred and eleven dollars and thirteen 
cents ($33,111.13). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' fami- 



RATNHAM. 147 

lies, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $69.84; in 1862, $820.67; in 
1863, $1,971.13; in 1864, $1,351.29; in 1865, $1,056.52. 
Total in four years, $5,269.45. 

^ The ladies of Norton held several fairs to raise money for 
the benefit of the soldiers, and during the whole of the war 
were at work making garments and other comfortable things for 
them, which were forwarded at different times.*' 

Raynham. — Incorporated April 2, 1731. Population in 
1860, 1,746; in 1865, 1,868. Valuation in 1860, $1,030,- 
743; in 1865, $1,115,026. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, were Henry 
H. Crane, Enoch Robinson, John D. G. Williams; in 1865, 
Henry H. Crane, Enoch Robinson, Thomas B. Johnson. 

The town clerk and treasurer during the years 1861, 1862, 
1863, and 1864, was Samuel Jones; in 1865, Dennis Rock- 
well. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 30th of April, at which it 
voted "that each soldier of the Bristol County Brigade, who 
resides in Raynham, be paid the sum of three dollars a week 
firom the time of the medical examination to the time when 
mustered into the service ; after that, to their families, or to 
themselves, if they have none." Also, fifteen dollars a month to 
each soldier " until some uniform law is adopted regulating their 
pay ; " also, a bonus of fifteen dollars when mustered into the 
military service. Five thousand dollars were appropriated to 
carry into eflTect the foregoing votes, the distribution and ex- 
penditure of which were given to the selectmen. July 20th, 
Eight hundred dollars were apppropriated for State aid to the 
families of the soldiers, and on the 4th of November five hun- 
dred dollars more were voted for the same purpose. 

1862. March 3d, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated 
for State aid to soldiers' families. July 2l8t, Voted, to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer who has enlisted, or who may enlist, within thirty days 
for three years, and be mustered in to the credit of the town. 



148 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

August 16th, An additional sum of seventy-five dollars was voted 
to be paid to each volunteer who enlisted to fill the first quota 
of the town. September Ist, Voted, to pay a bounty of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall 
enlist in the military service for nine months, and be credited 
to the quota of the town. At a meeting held on the 25th of 
September, the bounty was increased to one hundred and fifty 
dollars. 

18 03. At a meeting held on the 2d of March, five thou- 
sand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to 
soldiers' families ; and on the 17th of October Rev. Enoch 
Sanford, Cassander Gilmore, Charles T. Robinson, Sylvanus 
Makepeace, Enoch King, Ober S. Wilber, John Hanscom, 
and Theodore Dean were chosen to assist the selectmen in re- 
cruiting volunteers to fill the quota of the town. 

1864. At the annual town-meeting held March 7th, an 
appropriation was made for the payment of State aid ; and on 
the 4tli of April the town voted " to continue recruiting, and to 
pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each 
volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to 
the quota of the town;" this to continue until March, 1865. 
Another town-meeting was held on the 30th of July, at which 
tlie selectmen were authorized to pay the same bounty to men 
who enlist in the navy. This was continued until the end of 
the war. 

Raynham, according to the return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished two hundred and nine men for the war, which 
we regard as about fifteen more than was actually credited, as 
at the end of the war the town had, after filling its quota upon 
every call made, a surplus of eighteen men. Four were com- 
missioned ofiicers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was twenty-two thousand four hundred and forty- 
nine dollars and fifty-three cents ($22,449.53). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families 
of enlisted men, and which was afterwards repaid by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $1,120.74; in 1862, 



REHOBOTH. 149 

$3,220.31; in 18()3, $3,944.54 ; in 18fi4, $4,712.07 ; in 1805, 
$3,139.><3. TotJil «inioiint in four vear8, $1(5,243.49. 

The ladies of Raynham sent to the various hospitals, during 
the war, thirteen boxes of clothing, bedding, lint, dried fruits, 
and other articles, and did a great deal of useful work. 

Reiiohotii. — Incorporated June 4, 1G45. Population in 
1860, 1,932; in 18(35, 1,843. Valuation in 1860, $8S4,436 ; 
in 18(55, $764,906. 

The selectmen in 1861 were George B. Bliss, Nathaniel B. 
Horton, George W. Bliss ; in 1862, George B. Bliss, Xathaniel 
B. Horton, Ira Perry ; in 1863 .and 1864, George B. Bliss, 
Nathaniel B. Horton, Remember Smith; in l^<()5, Bradford B. 
Horton, Nathaniel B. Horton, Remember Smith. 

The town-clerk durinn^ all the vears of the war was Cvrus 
M. Whcaton. Tlie town-treasurer during the same period was 
George II. Carpenter. 

1861. A special town-meeting was held on the 6th of May, 
at which it was voted " to raise a volunteer company to lie in 
readiness for service when called upon by the Governor ; and 
that fifteen dollars bounty be paid to each person, a citizen of 
this town, who sh«ill enlist, and when called into actual scrvi(*e 
to be paid fifteen dollars a month in addition to what he re- 
ceived from the Government during his actual term of service ; 
and to be paid ten dollars for a uniform, and one dollar a day 
for drill service two davs in each week, to drill three hours 
each dav, not to exceed three months when orijanized.'' The 
treasurer was authorized to borrow five thousand dollars to 
carry the above vote into effect, and John C. Marvel and 
Cyrus M. Wheaton were associated with the selectmen "to 
draw such sums of money from the treasury as may l)e needed 
to pay the above expenses." John C. Marvel, N. B. ir»)rton, 
and M. R. Randall were chosen "to enlist volunteers." At a 
meeting held on the 12th of August, five hundred dollars were 
appropriated for the payment of State aid, "' in accordance with 
an act of the Legislature." 

1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 28th of 
July, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one Inmdred 



150 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for 
three years, and be credited to the town; and, "if said quota 
is filleil by September Ist, an additional twenty-five dollars/* 
The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-two hundred 
dollars. A large committee was chosen to recruit men. At a 
meeting held on the 14th of August, the bounty was increased 
to three hundred dollars ; and the treasurer was authorized to 
borrow sixty-six hundred dollars to meet the expense. On the 
22d of August the town voted to pay a bounty of two hundred 
dollars to each volunteer for nine months' service, when credited 
to the quota of the town. The treasurer was directed to bor- 
row the money to pay the same. September 10th, The treas- 
urer was authorized to borrow money for the payment of State 
aid to soldiers' families. At a special meeting held on the 6th 
of October, it was voted "that the enlisting committee be 
authorized to procure soldiers from other towns which have 
exoecdod their quotas, and pay them such bounties as they may 
iigwi} upon, to fill the quota of this town." 

18(»3. At a special meeting held December 7th, N. B. Hor- 
ton, Nelson Goff, and M. R. Randall were chosen "to furnish 
the town's quota under a call of the President dated Oct. 17, 
18(Sf(/* and said committee "was authorized to borrow a suffi- 
cient sum of money for that purpose." 

18<i4. At a special meeting held on the IGth of April, the 
following votes were passed : First, To raise twenty-five hun- 
di*t>d dollars by taxation to reimburse individuals who have 
udvanrtHl money to assist recruiting. Second, To raise thir- 
tiH*u InnuIriHl and twenty-five dollars, to complete the quota of 
tlio town on the last call of the President. Third, to authorize 
thr tivuHurrr "to hire money, if necessary, to fill any future 
rail oftlio President for men, up to March 1st, 1865." At a 
niiH'tiii^ held on the 30th of July, the bounty to volunteers for 
tlnvo vears was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

\H\u\, A special meeting was held on the 21st of October, 
at w hioh it was voted " to refund all moneys which have been 
i*\»nti'il>utetl by individuals for filling the quota of men for the 
piv^out war, and that the treasurer be authorized to hire a sufiS- 
clont !*um of money to pay the same." 



8EEK0NK. 151 

Kehoboth was reported by the selectmen in 1866 to have 
furnished one hundred and sixty men for the war, which was 
probably twenty-five less than the actual number furnished, as 
at the end of the war the town had a surplus of eighteen over 
and above all demands made upon it. Two were commissioned 
officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was thirty-one thousand and thirty-two dollars and ninety- 
six cents ($31,032.96). 

The amount raised and expended by the town during the 
four years of war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which 
was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $54.10; in 1862, $916.86; in 1863, $2,062.56; in 
1864, $1,688.10; in 1865, $1,550.00. Total amount in four 
years, $6,271.62. 

The ladies of Rehoboth contributed liberally to the wants of 
the soldiers. Several barrels containinor clothing: and other 
useful articles were sent to Lieutenant Cyrus W. Wheaton, Jr., 
Company B, Eighteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, 
while at the front, and to the Sanitary Commission. There 
were two organizations in the town : one was called " The 
Home Circle," and the other "The Congregational Church 
Home Circle.'* 

Seekonk. — Incorporated Feb. 26, 1812. Population in 
1860, 2,662; in 1865, 929.* Valuation in 1860, $1,365,- 
550 ; in 1865, $498,844. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Francis Armington, Samuel 
Chaffee, Allen J. Brown ; in 1862, Viall Medbury, Jonathan 
Chaffee, George H. Carpenter; in 1863, 1864, and 1865,- 
Zebinia W. Brown, Samuel Chaffee, Willard C. Ornisbee. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was Henry H. Ide; in 1862, Jona- 
than Chaffee; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, \V. C. Ormsbee. 



♦ It is proper to state that between these dates a large part of Seekonk was 
set of!* to the State of Rhode Island, and the fact that Seekonk, Kehoboth. and 
one or two other towns bordering on the rich itnd ])opulon8 city and county of 
ProTidence, R. I., rendered the payment by them of very large bounties a 
necesditj which comparatively few of our other towns felt. 



•i. 



152 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The town-treasurer in 1861 was Thomas W. Aspinwall ; in 
1862, John Hunt; in 1863, Ezekiel C. Gushing; in 1864 and 
1865, Ira ChafFee. 

1861. A general town-meeting was held on the Ist of May, 
to " know what action should be taken in the present crisis in 
regard to organizing a militia company in Seekonk." After 
discussion it was voted to raise one. Tristram Burgess, Esq., 
gave his check for one hundred dollars in aid of the enterprise ; 
and, on motion of Mr. Burgess, it was voted that, as part of 
the town may soon be set off t© Rhode Island, a committee be 
appointed to raise money by subscription to arm and support 
the company, and that a roll be immediately opened for volun- 
teers to sign. The meeting then adjourned until May lltli (in 
the mean time the company had been raised). It was voted 
"that the company raised have the use of the town hall for 
drilling, but not to be used on Sunday evenings." On the 22d 
of May another adjourned meeting was held, but nothing of 
especial interest or importance was done. On the 5th of No- 
vember a meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay State 
aid to the families of volunteers " in such sums as will be re- 
funded by the State." 

1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 22d of July, 
which voted " to raise by taxation one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars bounty to each volunteer, when sworn in and accepted." 
Another meeting was held August 14th (when the separation had 
taken place), at which the town voted to pay a bounty oi four 
hundred dollars to each volunteer who would enlist for three 
years, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the 
town ; also, a gratuity of three hundred dollars to each man who 
may be drafted, accepted, and credited to the quota of the town, 
the money for the payment of which " to be taken from the 
school-fund." At a meeting held on the 28th of August, the 
town voted to give a bounty of two hundred dollars to each vol- 
unteer for nine months' service, " and to borrow the money to 
pay the same from the school-fund." The selectmen were 
requested " to resign the office of recruiting ; " and John A. Ham- 
mond was appointed recruiting agent, " with reasonable pay." 
Another town-meeting was held on the 24th of September, 




8EEK0NK. 153 

when the recniiting officer was directed to enlist eigliteen volun- 
teers for nine months' service, and to pay the expenses of recruits 
"from home to camp and back, who may be rejected." On the 
14th of October the town voted to borrow money to pay State 
aid to tlie fumillea of volunteers, and twelve hundred dollars to 
pay bounties to recruits to fill the quota of the town. 

1803. A special meeting waa held on the 1st of August, at 
which the selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the fami- 
lies of drafted men; and on the 10th of December the town 
voted to pay a bounty of three hundred and twenty-five dollars 
to each volunteer, "provided the State will refund the same;"* 
and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money. 

1864. A town-meeting was held on the 4th of April, at 
which eleven hundred and twenty-five dollars were appropriated 
"to reimburse citizens who had voluntarily contributed money 
to fill the quotas of the town." It was alsir to pay henceforth 
a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each person 
who should volunteer for three years' service, and be credited 
to the quota of Seekonk. On the 3d of September it was voted 
to raise seventeen hundred and fifleen dollars " to pay recruiting 
bills ; " and that every person liable to draft should pay five 
dollars ; those not liable, two dollars ; and the remainder, if any, 
" to be assessed upon estates." At a meeting held on the 17th 
of September, "the tax-collector was instructed to collect to 
deficiency on the polls of those liable to draft." Other meet- 
ings were held during the year, but nothing of special interest 
was transacted. 

18G5. On the 30th of June a town-meeting was held, the 
war being over, at which it was voted " to raise money by taxa- 
tion sufficient to reimburse to citizens the amounts they had 
advanced to encourage recruiting and fill the quotas of the 
town." 

The selectmen of Seekonk reported in 1866 that the town 
had ftjrm'sltet/ gg,.|>t]tv men for the war, which must have been 
of necessity ^ . ^ueas-work. The facts show that Seekonk 
(uraiehed itj f lOta upon every call made by the President, 



jjjiroductorj' chapter, psgo U. 



154 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

and at the end of the war had a surplus of three over and above 
all demands. One was a commissioned officer. The amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the 
war, exclusive of State aid, was fourteen thousand nine hundred 
and forty-three dollars and fifty cents ($14,943.50). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' fami- 
lies, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows : In 1861, $65.50 ; in 1862, $394.41 ; in 1863, 
$613.55 ; in 1864, $892.65 ; in 1865, $586.30. Total amount 
in four years, $2,552.31. 

Somerset. — Incorporated Feb. 20, 1790. Population in 
1860, 1,793 ; in 1865, 1,791. Valuation in 1860, $914,070 ; 
in 1865, $865,618. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Henry E. 
Marble, Alfred Pratt, Nathan A. Chase ; in 1864, William P, 
Hood, William F. Hathaway, Marcus A. Brown ; in 1865, 
William P. Hood, William F. Hathaway, William H. Pierce, 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during the years 1861, 
1862, 1863, and 1864, was Leonard C. Pierce; in 1865, 
Elbridge G. Paul. 

1861. The first legal meeting, to consider matters relating 
to the war, was held May 1st, at which it was voted to appro- 
priate five hundred dollars *' to furnish uniforms for a military 
company;" also, to pay each volunteer a bounty of twenty-five 
dollars, and to pay him twenty-six dollars a month, ^Mncluding 
his Government pay," while in active service. The treasurer 
was authorized to borrow three thousand dollars " to meet these 
expenditures." A committee of seven was chosen, in whose 
charge the expenditure of the money was placed. November 
5th, Four hundred dollars were appropriated to pay aid to the 
families of volunteers living in the town. 

1862. July 2l8t, Voted, to pay to each volunteer who shall 
enlist for three years, to fill the quota of the town, a bounty of 
one hundred and fifty dollars, when mustered into service. The 
treasurer was authorized to borrow thirty-five hundred dollars 
to pay the same. August 9th, The bounty was increased to 



SOMERSET. 155 

three hundred dollars » and the treasurer was authorized to borrow 
twenty-seven hundred dollars to pay it. A committee of seven 
was appointed to aid the selectmen in recruiting. August 14th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer 
enlisting to the credit of the town for nine months' service. The 
selectmen and treasurer were authorized to borrow from time to 
time the amount of money that may be required to pay bounties, 
not to exceed in the aggregate six thousand dollars. Four more 
persons were added to the recruiting committee. August 30th, 
The vote limiting the amount to be borrowed to six thousand 
dollars was reconsidered, and the selectmen and treasurer were 
allowed to borrow whatever sums might be necessary to pay 
bounties and prevent a draft. Meetings were held nearly every 
week during the summer and autumn to encourage recruiting. 

1863. March 2d, Voted, to raise six hundred dollars to pay 
aid to the families of volunteers. This sum was increased in 
April and June fourteen hundred dollars, and on the 24th of 
October it was still further increased six hundred dollars. 
November 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow ten thou- 
sand dollars for recruiting purposes. 

1864. April 14th, Voted, to appropriate seventeen hundred 
and fifty dollars to pny bounties to fourteen men. April 12th, 
Voted, to borrow fifteen hundred dollars to pay bounties to 
twelve men ; voted, to assess the sum of two thousand nine 
hundred and fifty dollars **to refund the voluntary tax, and for 
recruiting purposes." Several other meetings were held during 
the year, at which money was appropriated, and means taken to 
obtain volunteers to fill the quota of the town. 

1865. January 9th, Voted, to raise fifteen hundred dollars 
to pay bounties to twelve volunteers. 

Somerset was reported by the selectmen in 1866 as having 
famished one hundred and ninety-seven men for the war, which 
may have been a little in excess of the credits which the town 
received ; but Somerset filled its quota upon every call of the 
President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of fourteen 
over and above all demands. Four were commissioned officers. 
The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty 



156 MASSACHUSETTS IX THE BEBELLION. 

thousand four hundred and eight dollars and fifty-five cents 
($30,408.55). A considerable amount was raised by private 
subscription which is not included in this amount. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' 
families, and which was afterwards repaid by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows : In 18G1, $213.00 ; in 1862, $1,301.60; 
in 1863, $2,264.04; in 1864, $2,093.75 ; in 1865, $1,900.00. 
Total amount in four years, $7,772.39. 

We only know in general terms that the ladies of Somerset 
" did a great deal of work for the soldiers during the war." 

SwANZEY. — Incorporated Oct. 30, 1667. Population in 
1860, 1,430; in 1865, 1,335. Valuation in 1860, $743,335 ; 
in 1865, $755,680. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John Earle, Allen 
Mason, Seth Brown; in 1863, Allen Mason, Seth Brown, 
Phillip BuflBnton ; in 1864, Allen Mason, Seth Brown, S.amuel 
Boyd ; in 1865, Allen Mason, Seth Brown, Elijah P. Chace. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was James 
Mason. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was 
Joseph F. Chace ; in 1864, John A. Wood ; in 1865, Joseph 
G. Luther. 

1861. A citizens' meeting was held on the 4th of May, the 
day on which information was received that the President had 
made a call for seventy-five thousand troops for three years' 
service. After discussion, the meeting voted to pay to each 
inhabitant of the town who would enlist under the call a gra- 
tuity of fifteen dollars, and to allow his wife one dolLar, and 
each of his children under fourteen years of age fifty cents, a 
week, for three years, unless the soldier was sooner discharged ; 
and the treasurer was to borrow the money to meet the expendi- 
ture. A legal town-meeting was held on the 5th of November, 
at which it was voted to pay State aid to the families of volun- 
teers, as provided by the act in relation to that subject, passed 
at the extra session of the Legislature. 

1862. A town-meeting was held on the 21st of July, at 
which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one 



SWANZEY. 157 

huD(lred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for three 
years in the military service, and be credited to the quota of 
the town ; and the treasurer was directed to borrow money to 
pay the same. Another meeting was held on the 9th of August, 
at which Allen Mjison, Seth Brown, Nathan M. Wood, and 
Parker H. Weaver were appointed a recruiting coiumittee. 
On the 13th of August this committee reported that the quota 
of the town had been filled. Another meeting was held on the 
16th, at which it was voted to recruit two more men; and the 
treasurer was authorized to borrow five thousand dollars for 
recruiting and bounty purposes. The selectmen were also 
directed to confer with the town authorities of the adjoining 
towns of Rehoboth, Somerset, Dighton, and Seekonk, in re- 
gard to raising a military company for nine months' service, of 
which number the town of Swanzey was to furnish seventeen 
men. An adjourned meeting was held on the 22d of August, 
when a report was made by the selectmen, that they had con- 
ferred with the selectmen of the other towns, and they were 
unanimous in favor of the project. The treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow money '* sufficient to pay StJite aid to the fami- 
lies of soldiers livin<j in Swanzev." Another meetino: was held 
on the 30th of August, when a report was made by the re- 
cruiting committee concerning enlistments, which was regarded 
as satisfactory. The town voted to direct the treasurer to bor- 
row, not exceeding four thousand dollars, " to pay the nine- 
months volunteers." On the 27th of September still another 
meeting was held, at which the treasurer was authorized to bor- 
row more money for the payment of bounties to volunteers, and 
State aid to their families. 

18C3. A legal town-meeting was held on the 14th of 
December, at which the town appointed Allen Mason and 
Mason Brown agents to recruit seventeen men to fill the quota 
of the town under " the new call of the President ; " and that 
they be allowed and paid two dollars and fifty cents a day while 
engaged in the work, "and reasonable travelling expenses." 

1804, Several meeting's were held durin^i: this vear to devise 
ways and means to encourage recruiting and to provide State 
aid for the soldiers* families, the last of which was on the 14th 



158 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

of June, when the recruiting agents were directed to recruit 
men to fill the quota of the town, under a call which it was 
expected the President would soon issue. Nathan M. Woods 
was added to the committee to assist in recruiting. The treas- 
urer was directed to borrow money, and to pay each volunteer, 
when properly credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars. This system, without 
material alteration, was continued until the end of the war. 

The selectmen reported in 1866 that the town had furnished 
one hundred and three men for the war, which is full thirty-five 
less than the number actually furnished and credited to the 
town, as it filled its full quota upon every call made by the 
President for volunteers, and at the end of the war had a sur- 
plus of ten over and above all demands. It is proper also to 
state that twenty-five citizens of Swanzey enlisted in Rhode- 
Island regiments, for whom no credit was given nor allowance 
made. The whole amount of money appropriated by the town 
and raised by private subscription, and expended on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was nineteen thousand nine 
hundred and eighty dollars and fifty-eight cents ($19,980.58). 

The whole amount of money raised and expended by the 
town during the four years of the war for State aid to the 
families of enlisted men, and which was afterwards repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $145.76; in 

1862, $1,036.80; in 1863, $1,130.08; in 1864, $889.20; 
in 1865, $800.00. Total amount in four years, $4,001.64. 

Taunton. — Incorporated as a town Sept. 3, 1639; as a 
city. May 11, 1864. Population in 1860, 15,376 ; in 1865, 
16,005. Valuation in 1860, $8,211,023; in 1865, $8,- 
463,074. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Allen Pres- 
brey, Cornelius White, Isaac G. Currier; in 1864, Allen 
Presbrey, Nathan S. Williams, Abram Briggs. In 1864 a 
city government was formed, and Edward H. Bennett was 
chosen mayor. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Henry C. Porter; in 

1863, 1864, and 1865, James M. Cushman. The town-treas- 



TAUNTON. 159 

urer in ISfil and 1862 was Phillip T. Brewster; in 1863, 
1864, and 1865, George A. Washburn. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon questions 
relating to the war, was held on the 27th of April, when the 
town voted to furnish a complete uniform to each soldier who 
should enlist from Taunton, and should be accepted and mus- 
tered into the service of the United States ; also, to pay each 
a bounty of fifteen dollars, '^and such a sum per month as 
would make his pay twenty-six dollars a month," when added 
to what was paid by the Government. Samuel L. Crocker, 
Henry Williams, Thompson Newbury, Lovett Morse, Harrison 
Tweed, Samuel O. Dunbar, and Le Baron B. Church were 
chosen a committee to carry these votes into effect. Another 
town-meeting was held on the 13th of July, and six thousand 
dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the 
families of soldiers ; and still another meeting was held on the 
10th of October, when ten thousand dollars additional were 
voted for the same purpose. 

1802. A town-meeting was held on the 14th of August, at 
which the town voted to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars 
*'to each volunteer who had enlisted, or who should hereafter 
enlist, under the pending call of the President for three hun- 
dred thousand volunteers for three years' service," when mus- 
tered in and credited to the quota of the town. Another meeting 
was held on the 26th of August, at which the town voted to 
pay each volunteer for nine months' service a bounty of one 
hundred dollars, who should be mustered in and credited to the 
quota of the town. 

1863. No special action appears to have been necessary by 
the to\vn in its corporate capacity during this year, either in 
regard to filling its quotas, or in the payment of State aid to the 
families of the soldiers, although recruiting went on, bounties 
were paid, and the families were properly provided for. 

1864. At a legal town-meeting held on the 4th of April, 
it was voted to raise thirty thousand dollars to refund money 
which had been contributed by private citizens for the purpose 
of procuring volunteers to fill the quotas of the town, under 
calls made by the President for men. Another meeting was 



M 



'tA^^Ai.-HUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 



■.J ■ r •» 



ti::^t? 



r' April, at which it was voted to pay to each 

in the militarv service, and is credite<l to 

'• ■'♦r :!»w!i, a bounty of one hundred and twenty- 

L. '^ . l::..! rhis was continued until the end of the war. 

■v""i*t made by the citv authorities in IX\Uk it 

IV ii'-M ':iL L'.uinton furnished fourteen hundred and ninety- 

•'■' :t ■ :• ::io war, which is probably the number furnishe<l 

.!.■::■•■ KTvioe, and does not include those for which it 

■ ».: vv:\L'«I credit in the navy; as at the end of the war 

i :ui I ?urplus of sixty-three men, after having furnished 

:.. .:: -.{[^xm every call made by the President. Fifty- 

- ' ■ Liiiii[s^i(>ned officers. The whole amount of money 

• .•v«i ind expended by the town on account of the 

, iu'l::dinv: State aid, was one hundred and sixty 

.>.i ■. . ^fic hundred and forty-one dollars and twenty-three 

' '•.. .:.* ii:jr of money raised and expended by the town dur- 

«. 1 ar vcars of the war in the payment of State aid to 

• ■ ii«.> .'f volunteers, and which was afterwards repaid by 

.!t.ii*:i«calth, was as follows: In ISlU, $10, 125. OS ; 

>. •:. <:^n.»m1.34; in 18(53, $34,4(>4.31 ; in LsiU, $29,- 

- lNi;:>, $15,235.17. Total in four years, $117,- 

' K .u:\'s of Taunton, from the first commencement of the 
JO c"vl, were very active in furnishing needful articles 
I iv . i-LT^uvrs, chiefly through the Sanitary Commission." 

'\ ..x»^vs:i. -Incorporated July 2, 1787. Population in 
x; . ■•. ■ •:; in 18(55, 2,802. Valuation in 1860, $1,803,- 
.>•'*, it 1,453.81)7. 
' 'iv *v\v:sucu in 18()1 were E. P. Brownell, Rcstcomc 
^....^ .. v . U.u'xoy W. Kirby ; in 18()2, E. P. Brownell, Kest- 
Vs^.wilvr, Thomas Sanford ; in 18G3, 1864, and 1865, 
* \»:v\w.u'U, Thomas Sanford, George Lawton. 
' 'iv '^^xolork in 1861 was Israel Allen; in 1862 and 18i;3, 
: ..:.iml: in 1864, Israel Allen; in 1865, Albert C. 
y . ,> , Vlio town-treasurer in 1861 was Israel Allen ; in 
V. t V, l>63, Isaac I lowland ; in 18(34, Israel Allen; in 
v.*. ;.NVuanl Mucomber. 



• .k\ 



162 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Bay, " I am exempt from responsibility in this hour of our country's 
peril." 

Resolved^ That the people of Westport are devoted to the Union, 
and are loyal to the Government. The soil of rebellious Virginia now 
holds the bodies of two of her sons as pledges of her devotion, and as 
tokens of her loyalty. 

Resolved, Therefore, that each and every person who shall volun- 
teer as a part of the quota of the town, under the last call of the Presi- 
dent for three hundred thousand troops, shall recei\^e the sum of two 
hundred dollars when he shall be mustered into service, provided he 
shall, at the time of his enlistment, be a resident of Westport. 

Resolved, That the selectmen are hereby authorized and instructed 
to go beyond the limits of this town for the purpose of securing volun- 
teers, whenever they shall deem it expedient, legitimate, and proper, 
and upon such terms as they shall deem best. 

Resolved, That, provided we are personally compelled to submit to a 
draft, each person so drafled shall receive the sum of two hundred 
dollars, which he may use for the benefit of his ^mily, or for the pur- 
pose of procuring a substitute. 

Resolved, That the town-treasurer is hereby authorized and in- 
structed to borrow money at such time and in such sums as shall be 
found necessary to meet the bounty promised and actually paid to vol- 
unteers by authority of either of the foregoing resolutions. 

Resolved, That we remember with the highest respect and gratitude 
the brave men who have been or who are now in the field, in the ser- 
vice of our country. It may be well said they have borne the burthen 
and heat of the day. Those having fallen by the way, we mourn their 
loss, and posterity willlsnow their names ; if any have lost their health, 
they shall have our sympathy, and our children will remember the 
sacrifice. 

Resolved, That Westport shall have no conscriptions ; and therefore 
a draft upon her citizens, in order to meet the second call of the Com- 
mander-in-chief for troops, should be avoided at every reasonable sac- 
rifice, as well as by energetic and legitimate action. 

1863. Nothing of special interest appears to have been 
done, "in legal town-meeting," in regard to the war during this 
year, although the selectmen continued to recruit volunteers, 
and to pay State aid to soldiers* families. 

1864. At a town-meeting held on the 23d of April, the 
following resolution was passed : — 



WE8TP0RT. 163 

Jiesolved, That we do hereby exonerate our selectmen from the con- 
tumely cast upon them by the writer of an article that appears in the 
"Republican Standard" of Feb. 25, 1864, entitled " Recruiting in West- 
port,*' and still retain the utmost confidence in them as gentlemen of 
ability and integrity, and hereby tender them our sincere thanks and 
approbation for their energy and faithfulness in carrying out the in- 
structions (adopted at the various meetings held during the present 
Rebellion) to procure the requisite number of men required from 
the town, to answer the several calls of the President of the United 
States.* 

The selectmen in 1866 reported that •W^estport had fur- 
nished two hundred and forty-five men for the war, which evi- 
dently did not include men in the navy. Westport probably 
furnished about two hundred and ninety men, as it filled its 
quota upon every call made by the President, and at the end of 
the war had a surplus of thirty-two over and above all demands. 
One was a commissioned officer in the military service. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account 6( the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty- 
one thousand, nine hundred and sixteen dollars and forty cents 
($31,916.40). 

The whole amount of money raised and expended by the 
town during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' 
families, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, $18.00; in 1862, $2,038.00; in 1863, 
$4,595.58; in 1864, $3,367.44; in 1865, $2,393.74. Total 
amount in four years, $12,412.76. 

* We can only guess the character and tone of tlie article referred to. Mr. 
Brownell, the chairman of the Board of Selectmen, and who died wlille this 
Tolume was passing through the press, we knew intimately : he was one of the 
truest and best men in the State. 



CHAPTER V. 



DUKES COUNTY. 



This county is formed of the Islands of Martha's Vineyard. 
These islands lie off and south of Barnstable County and Buz- 
zard's Bay, and contain about one hundred and twenty square 
miles. They constitute five townships, as follows : Edgartown, 
Chilmark, Gay Head^ Gosnold, and Tisbury. The town of 
Gay Head was incorporated in 1870, from a part of Chilmark ; 
and therefore its war record is included in that of the mother- 
town. The shire town of the county is Edgartown. The 
population of Dukes County in 1860 was 4,403 ; in 1865, 
4,200, being a decrease in five years of 203. The population 
in 1870 was 3,787, which is a further decrease in five years of 
413. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $2,908,194; 
in 1865, $2,183,976, which is a decrease in five years of 
$724,218. 

By the returns made by the selectmen of the several towns in 
1866, the number of men furnished in the entire county for the 
war was 240, which is only about half of the real number 
which the county furnished for the army and navy during the 
war. It filled its quota on every call made by the President, 
and at the end had a surplus of forty-seven men over and above 
all demands. The expenses of the towns on account of the 
war, exclusive of State aid, were $51,222.92. The amount 
raised and paid for State aid to soldiers' families during the war, 
and afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was $7,561.97. 
Total amount, $58,784.89. 

The following is the record of each town in the county : — 

Chilmark. — Incorporated Oct. 30, 1714. Population in 
1860, 654 ; in 1865, 547. Valuation in 1860, $598,863 ; in 
1865, $350,801. 



GHILMARK. 165 

The selectmen in 1861 were Horatio W. Tilton, Tristram 
Mayhew, Stephen D. Skiff; in 1862, Tristram Mayhew, John 
W. Mayhew, Smith Mayhew ; in 1863, Tristram Mayhew, 
Samuel T. Hancock, John Hammett ; in 1864, Herman Vin- 
cent, Horatio W. Tilton, William Norton ; in 1865, Herman 
Vincent, Tristram Mayhew, Moses Adams. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Josiah W. Tilton ; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, James N. Tilton. The town-treasurer 
in 1861 was Allen Tilton; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, 
Benjamin Manter. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relat- 
ing to the war, was held on the 16th of December, at which the 
town voted to authorize the selectmen ** to act according to the 
law of the Commonwealth, in regard to the payment of State 
aid to the families of volunteers who have enlisted in the mili- 
tary service of the United States." 

1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 14th of June, 
at which the selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the 
families of volunteers, or to those who are dependent on them 
for support, "as they may think proper." Another special 
meeting was held on the 12th of July, when the following vote 
was passed : — 

Voted, To pay the sum of one hundred dollars to each of the first 
four volunteers, or, in case of no volunteers, the same sum to be paid 
to each of the first four persons hereafter drafted, provided such persons 
shall pass the necessary examination before the authorized officer. 

These were men for three years' service. At a town-meeting 
held on the 26th of August, it was — 

Votedf To raise six hundred dollars for each three-years volunteer, 
and that it should be paid them as soon as they are mustered into 
service. 

Votedy To raise three hundred dollars for each nine-months volun- 
teer who may enlist before the quota is full. 

Voted, That the selectmen hire a sufficient amount of money to 
pay volunteers who may enlist in the United-States service, if it be 
needed. 

Voted, That the selectmen have authority to pay each of the three- 
years volunteers the sum of six hundred dollars, and pay to each of the 



166 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

nine-months volunteers the sum of three hundred dollars, when he is 
mustered into the United-States service, until the quota of the town is 
filled. 

This system of paying bounties to volunteers and State aid 
to their families continued until the end of the war. 

The selectmen in 1866 reported that Chilmark had furnished 
twenty-six men for the war, which undoubtedly is only the 
number of residents of the town who were in the military ser- 
vice. Mr. Norton, the town-clerk, under date of January 16th, 
1871, writes as follows : "As to the number of men furnished, we 
cannot tell. All we know, we filled all our quotas, and paid some 
five thousand dollars in bounties for volunteers." The truth is, 
Chilmark furnished about sixty men for the war ; for, after 
having filled every demand made upon it by the President, the 
town had a surplus of one over and ab6ve all demands. One 
was a commissioned oflScer. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was five thousand one hundred and fifty- 
one dollars and seventy-nine cents ($5,151.79). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during the four years of the war, 
and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $25.71; in 1862, $132.00; in 1863, 
$104.00; in 1864, $232.72; in 1865, $90.44. Total amount 
in four years, $586.87. 

The ladies of Chilmark did every thing they could for the 
soldiers. Their isolated position gave them small opportunity 
to do all they would have been pleased to do ; as it was, they 
furnished, in clothing and money, to the value of about one hun- 
dred dollars. 

Edgartown. — Incorporated July 8, 1671. Population in 
1860, 2,118 ; in 1865, 1,846. Valuation in 1860, $1,369,721 ; 
in 1865, $1,035,467. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Jeremiah Pease, John H. Pease, 
Nathaniel M. Jernegan ; in 1862, David Davis, John H. Pease, 
Cornelius B. Marchant ; in 1863, William Bradley, Cornelius 
B. Marchant, Tristram Cleveland; in 1864, Benjamin Davis, 



EDGARTOWN. 167 

John Vinson, Joseph T. Pease; in 1865, David Davidson, 
Samuel Keniston, Jeremiah S. Weeks. 

The town-clerk during each of the years of the war was Bar- 
nard C. Marchant. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Daniel 
Fisher; in 1862, 1868, and 1864, John A. Baylies; in 1865, 
Isaiah D. Coffin. 

We have not been able to obtain as full inforrajition from the 
town records, showing the action of the town during the war, 
as from the other towns. We know, however, that great activity 
prevailed during the whole time in raising men and money. 

In 1863, it having been believed that injustice had been done 
to the town at the State House in not giving it proper credits for 
the men which it had enlisted, and to whom bounties had been 
paid, it was — 

Votedf That the selectmen of Edgartown be, and they are hereby 
authorized and requested, to take all needful measures to ascertain 
whether the full number of men, enlisted and paid for as the quota of 
£k]gartowD, are duly credited to this town, and if not to cause the 
necessary correction to be made at headquarters. 

We are not informed what kind of report the selectmen made 
upon the subject intrusted to them ; but we have reason to 
believe that they were satisfied no fault could properly be attrib- 
uted to those persons who had charge of the military rolls at 
the State House. 

The selectmen reported in 1866 that Edgartown had furnished 
one hundred and twenty-five men for the war, which was very 
far short of the number actually furnished and credited. Prob- 
ably the men who served in the navy and men who were 
enlisted in other places were not. returned, as Edgartown filled 
its quota upon every call made by the President, and at the end 
of the war had a surplus of forty-six over and above all demands. 
The number, therefore, which it really furnished, could not have 
been less than two hundred and thirty. Three were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was twenty-three thousand three hundred and twenty- 
five dollars and thirteen cents ($23,325.13). 



168 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 
enlisted men, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commou- 
wealth, was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $390.10; in 
1863, $944.06; in 1864, $1,088.82; in 1865, $700.00. 
Total amount in four years, $3,122.98. 

GosNOLD. — Incorporated March 17, 1864. Population in 
I860,—; in 1865, 108. Valuation in I860,—; in 1865, 
$112,993. 

The selectmen from the date of incorporation until the close 
of the war were Abraham C. White, John W. GifFord, Benja- 
min B. Church. 

The town-clerk for the same period was Samuel E. Skiff. 

During the years 1861, 1862, 1863, and until the 17th of 
March, 1864, Gosnold was a part of the town of Chilmark ; and 
its war history up to that time forms a part of the history of 
the town from which it was set off. The only person who had 
a residence in the part of Chilmark which now forms the town 
of Gosnold, who was a volunteer in the military service, was 
Oliver G. Grennell, Jr., and he was credited to the quota of 
Chilmark; but, after Gosnold was incorporated as a separate 
and distinct municipality, he was transferred, and credited to the 
quota of the new town, where he belonged. Grennell, after 
his original term of service expired, re-enlisted as a veteran 
volunteer, and served until the end of the war. In 1865 Gos- 
nold furnished another volunteer for the military service, to 
whom a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars was 
paid by the town ; and this appears to have been the whole 
amount which was appropriate^ and paid by the town for boun- 
ties to volunteers. 

The whole amount raised and expended by the town for State 
aid to the families of volunteers during the years of the war, 
and afterwards repaid to it by the Commonwealth, was as fol- 
lows : In 1864, $61.14; in 1865, $94.00. Total amount, 
$155.14. 

TiSBURY. — Incorporated July 8, 1671. Population in 



TI8BURY. 169 

1860, 1,631 ; in 1865, 1,699. Valuation in 1860, $939,610 ; 
in 1865, $684,710. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Henry Bradley, David Smith, 
Bartlett Mayhew, 2d ; in 1862 and 1863, Matthew P. Butler, 
Joseph S. Adams, Bartlett Mayhew, 2d ; in 1864 and 1865, 
Henry Bradley, Charles D. Harding, Bartlett Mayhew, 2d. 

The town-clerk during each year of the war was Lot Luce. 
The town-treasurer during the same period was Charles Bradley. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 7th of May, when it was 
voted that Henry Bradley, chairman of the selectmen, be 
directed to confer with the authorities of the Commonwealth, 
^ to furnish an armed guard coaster, to be stationed in the Vine- 
yard Sound, for the protection of commerce passing through 
the Sound ; and to furnish the town of Tisbury with three or 
more rifled cannon and one hundred stand of small arms, and 
equipments for the same, to be used by the inhabitants of the 
town to repel invasion." The meeting adjourned for a week, 
when Mr. Bradley reported that he had attended to his duty, 
and the Governor and Council had given him an order for one 
cannon and carriage, and one hundred muskets. It was then 
voted that the selectmen act in concert with the Coast Guard 
Committee of New Bedford, and, if needed, to borrow money 
sufficient to sustain a steamer ** to ply in Buzzard's Bay for coast 
defence." On the 5th of November the selectmen were author- 
ized to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as provided 
by law. 

1862. A special town-meeting was held on the 8th of July, 
at which the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three 
years* service, who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of 
the town ; also, that he " shall receive one dollar a month for 
each member of his family that is dependent on him for sup- 
port, during his term of service, in addition to what the State 
pays.'* On the 22d of August " a committee of three, in addi- 
tion to the selectmen," were appointed, "by acclamation," to aid 
in recruiting men, with authority to pay, if necessary to fill the 
quota of the town, to each volunteer a bounty of five hundred 



170 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

dollars, and the inhabitants of Tisburj to have until the 27th 
inst. " to come forward and fill the quota," which if not then 
filled, the committee shall procure the men elsewhere ; and the 
committee were '* to make this their special duty, and receive a 
reasonable compensation." It was also voted " that, if a man 
enlists in the town, and is rejected by the examining officer, his 
expenses shall be paid by the town." 

1863. A special town-meeting was held on the 22d of July, 
at which the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to pay 
the treasurer of the Commonwealth, as provided in the act " to 
provide for the reimbursements of bounties paid volunteers." 

1864. Several meetings were held during this year, to devise 
ways and means to procure volunteers, and provide for the pay- 
ment of State aid to their families ; also, to repay those citizens 
for money which they had advanced, to assist in filling the quota 
of the town. 

By the return made by the selectmen in 1866, Tisbury fur- 
nished eighty-eight men for the war, which must have meant 
only the number belonging to the town in the military service, 
as it filled its quota upon every call of the President. Tisbury 
had no surplus, but it furnished the exact number required of it, 
which must have been about one hundred and seventy. None 
were commissioned officers in the military service. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-two 
thousand six hundred and twenty-one dollars ($22,621.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended during the years 
of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $54.12 ; 
in 1862, $509.20; in 1863, $1,312.78; in 1864, $1,170.88; 
in 1865, $650.00. Total amount, $3,696.98. 



CHAPTER VI. 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



This county is bounded north-west by Rockingham County, 
New Hampshire ; south-west by Middlesex County, south by 
Suffolk County, east and north-east by the Atlantic Ocean, 
and south-east by Massachusetts Bay. 

Essex County is one of the most historical in the State, and 
the birthplace of many wise and great men. It has an exten- 
sive sea-coast, indented with numerous bays, inlets, and har- 
bors ; it has many delightful farms and beautiful ponds ; it is 
to Eastern Massachusetts what Berkshire County is to Western 
Massachusetts, — a place of pleasant resort in the warm months 
of summer, to those who love the sea more than they do the 
valleys and the mountains. In former years the chief interests 
of Essex County were foreign commerce and the fisheries. At 
the present day, although the fishing interest holds its place, 
the foreign commerce of the county has in a great measure 
been transferred to Boston and New York. It is now largely 
devoted to manufactures. At the commencement of the present 
century, the school-books in their enumeration of large com- 
mercial places always spoke of Marblehead, which, although it 
is now larger than at any previous time, has been outstripped 
by Gloucester as a fishing and commercial town, and is as 
much interested in the manufacture of shoes as in commerce 
and the fisheries. 

The number of municipalities in the county is thirty-four ; of 
these Gloucester, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lynn, Newburyport, 
and Salem are large and flourishing cities. In 1860 the popu- 
lation of the county was 165,611, in 1865 it was 171,192, 
being an increase in five years of 5,581. The population of 
the county in 1870 was 200,843, which is an increase in five 
years of 29,651. The valuation of the county in 1860 was 



172 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

$84,637,837, in 1865 it was $90,393,467, being an increase 
in five years of $5,755,630. 

According to the returns made by the city and town authori- 
ties in 1866, with the exception of Salem and Saugus, which 
made no return, Essex County furnished 17,806 men for the 
war. Since that time Salem has made a return, in which it 
claims to have furnished 2,789. Saugus has made no return, 
but it probably furnished 210 men. Add these to the returns 
made in 1866, and they make the whole number furnished by 
all the cities and towns in the county 20,805, which we believe 
to be nearly the exact number which was furnished and credited. 
Every city and town furnished its contingent upon every call 
made by the President, and each at the end of the war had a 
surplus over and above all demands, which in the aggregate 
amounted to 1,678. 

The total amount of expenses incurred by all the cities and 
towns in Essex County on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid paid to the families of volunteers in the army and 
navy, was $1,409,536.05. The amount paid during the war 
years for State aid to the families and dependants of volunteers, 
and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, 
was $1,625,184.18. Total amount, $3,034,720.23. 

The following is the record of each city and town in the 
county : — 

Amesbury. — Incorporated April 29, 1668. Population in 
1860, 3,877; in 1865, 4,210. Valuation in 1860, $1,302,- 
864; in 1865, $1,677,632. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William J. Boardman, David 
M. Tukesbury, Frederick A. Sargent; in 1862, William J. 
Boardman, David M. Tukesbury, Nathan Martin ; in 1863, 
David M. Tukesbury, Phillip Osgood, Daniel Gould ; in 1864, 
William J. Boardman, David M. Tukesbury, W. F. M. 
Huntington ; in 1865, David M. Tukesbury, W. F. M. 
Huntington, S. S. Blodgett. 

The town-clerk during all these years was Joseph Merrill. 
The treasurer in 1861 was William F. Vining ; in 1862, 1863, 
1864, and 1865, E. M. Morse. 



AMESBURT. 173 

1861. On the 27th of April a town-meeting was held, at 
hich a preamble and resolutions prepared by William C. Bin- 

T\ey were adopted. The preamble sets forth in strong language, 
stud at considerable length, that the Government was formed to 
8«cure the blessings of liberty ; that the Rebellion was without 
adequate cause, and that it was the duty of all good citizens to 
maintain and uphold the Union to the extent of their ability. 
It was resolved, therefore, to furnish the Governor of the Com- 
monwealth to their utmost extent with men and money, "to 
enable him to respond promptly and efficiently to the present, 
or any other requisition of the Government of the United States, 
to put down rebellion, and to enforce the laws of the land ; '* 
that five thousand dollars be raised to assist in uniforming and 
equipping such of the inhabitants as may enlist in the military 
service, and to assist in supporting their families while they 
are in the service ; also, that ten dollars a month " be paid to 
every single man, and twenty dollars to every married man, 
who may enlist and are inhabitants of Amesbury, in addition 
to the pay allowed by the Government," the pay to begin " as 
soon as the company is organized and commence drilling ; " and 
Patten Sargent, William H. Haskell, John E. Cowden, John 
S. Poyen, William C. Burney, Benjamin A. Follensbee, were 
chosen to act with the selectmen in the expenditure of the 
money and to encourage recruiting. Immediately after the 
meeting a company was organized, and commenced drilling. 
It afterwards formed part of the First Regiment of Heavy 
Artillery Massachusetts Volunteers. November 5th, The town 
authorized the selectmen ^' to hire such sums of money as may 
be needed to aid the families of volunteers." 

1862. July 9th, The town voted " to pay each volunteer, to 
the number of forty-one, a bounty of one hundred dollars, who 
shall enlist for the period of three years and be credited to the 
quota of the town." The selectmen were instructed " to use all 
diligence to fill the quota of the town without delay," and to 
employ suitable aid for that purpose. They were also author- 
ized to borrow money for the payment of bounties, and to co- 
operate with the adjoining town of Salisbury in organizing a 
new company to be composed of volunteers from each town; 



174 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

and, if the arrangement could not be made, they were to induce 
volunteers to enlist to fill up the ranks of the Amesbury com- 
pany in the First Regiment Heavy Artillery. The same bounty 
was to be paid as had previously been fixed upon. August 
14th, A town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to increase 
the bounty to two hundred dollars for three-years men, and to 
pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to men enlisting 
for nine months ; and the selectmen were authorized to borrow 
a sufficient amount of money " to carry the foregoing votes into 
eflTect," and to confer with the Governor and with the authori- 
ties of Salisbury in regard to raising a full company for nine 
months' service. September 18th, Another meeting was held, 
at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty 
dollars to forty-two men, already in camp, as soon as they 
should be mustered in to the credit of the town ; and the select- 
men were authorized to borrow the money to pay them. 

1863. December 14th, The town authorized the selectmen 
to advance to each recruit such an amount of money as they 
might deem proper, provided the recruit agreed to refund the 
same from his State bounty when received ; and five hundred 
dollars were set apart for that purpose. A committee of six was 
chosen to co-operate with the selectmen. 

1864. April 18th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
whatever sums of money they might require to procure recruits 
for the quota of the town, upon any call of the President up to 
the 1st of March, 1865, provided the bounty paid to each vol- 
unteer shall not exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 
May 25th, The town voted to borrow a sum not exceeding five 
thousand dollars, firom which to pay three hundred dollars to 
each drafted man to procure a substitute, or pay commutation- 
fee. November 8th, The selectmen were directed to continue 
recruiting, and to borrow ten thousand dollars for the purpose, 
and three thousand dollars additional for recruiting purposes. 

1865. March 6th, The selectmen were directed to continue 
recruiting, and to raise a sum not exceeding ten thousand dollars 
for that purpose. 

The town furnished four hundred and eighty-four men for 
the war, which was a surplus of twenty-eight over all demands. 



ANDOVER. 175 

Eighteen were commissioned officers. The total amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exchisive of State aid, was forty thousand five hundred 
and fifty-seven dollars ($40,557.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, 
and afterwards repaid to it by the Commonwealth, was as fol- 
lows : In 1861, $1,151.20; in 1862, $4,822.96; in 1863, 
$8,518.57 ; in 1864, $7,827.07 ; in 1865, $4,500.00. Total 
amount, $26,819.80. 

Andover. — Incorporated May 6, 1668. Population in 
1860, 4,765 ; in 1865, 5,309. Valuation in 1860, $2,339,977 ; 
in 1865, $2,702,426. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were William S. Jenkins, 
Asa A. Abbott, Benjamin Boynton ; in 1863 and 1864, John 
B. Abbott, Benjamin Boynton, George Foster; in 1865, Wil- 
liam S. Jenkins, John B. Abbott, Herman Phelps. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was Edward Taylor. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
connected with the war, was held on the 6th of May ; at which 
it was voted to furnish each resident of the town who enlists in 
the military service with a uniform, a rubber blanket, and seven- 
teen dollars in money, when " called into actual service ; " also, 
to remit his poll-tax, to pay eight dollars a month as aid to his 
family, and fifty cents a day for every day spent in drilling, 
previous to being mustered in to the United-States service, not 
exceeding in all sixty days. The free use of the town hall 
was given to the military. The treasurer was authorized to 
borrow, not exceeding eight thousand dollars, for the above pur- 
poses ; and William Chickering, Jedidiah Bitrtt, and John B. 
Jenkins were appointed a committee of "National Defence" 
for the expenditure of the money. A series of patriotic resolu- 
tions were passed, among which were the following : — 

Resolved^ That we will respond to the call of the President of the 
United States for the means to suppress this Rebellion, by encourag- 
ing volunteers in this town to enlist in the service of the Goverument, 



174 



MASSACHUSETTS IN THE EEl 



and, if the arrangement could not be ni; 
volunteers to enlist to fill up the rank 
pany in tlie First Kcgiinent Heavy An 
was to be paid as had previously 1- 
14th, A town-meeting was held, at wl 
the bountv to two hundred dollars 
pay a bounty of one hundred and 
for nine months ; and the selectni' 
a sufficient amount of money " tr 
eflcct," and to confer with the ( 
ties of Salisbury in regard to 
months' service. September 
at which it was voted to pay 
dollars to forty-two men, n 
should Ije mustered in to tin 
men were authorized to lin* 

18G3. December 14tli ' 
to advance to each recrip' 
might deem proper, pro\ 
same from his State b< 
dollars were set apai*t U 
chosen to co-operate w' 

1864. April 1 «th,' 
whatever sums of ni* ' 
for the quota of the t 
the Ist of March, J>^ 
untcer shall not ev 



■ t'liuilifs ill 

■ -1 :i!iil loval 

-'■ :uiil I'Xi'c'ute ; 

psi-j-SLnl by this 



rv fk'S(Tiption. but 

— as thev would fill- 

.■•sewiio are inimical 

.'A gratify thi* auxious 

•re<lom in gcntM'al ; as 

«rives and posterity ; as 

- .ind patriot.^, and of our 

•i"* that we muv enjoy the 

><i resolutions, and to exert 

•IV- to promote the important 



•odonal Defence were dis- 
^rwced to perform the duties 



^v 



May 25th, The to^ 
thousand dollart^, ' 
cacli drafted man 
fee. Novcmb< 
recruiting, and *^*^ 
and three thuus- ** 
1865. Mi. ^ 



.*a "y) the families of volunteers 
fcca. to pay a bounty of one 
.^^tjc^ff who shall enlist for three 
,Avia of the town. The treasurer 
^ A*.>;t^lin<j fiftv-three hundred dol- 
I ^auitf. August 25th, The same 
:ttu to be paid to volunteers for 
.ji.««iiOcr 1st, A committee was ap- 
w4j^^4 district to aid the selectmen in 
v4«u that to volunteers not living 
. ^^_ fc X'unty of one hundred and ten 



.v«^ 



,» uiiic State aid be paid to soldiers' 



»*j^ 



recruiting, an» ** 



for that purpt 

The tovvh • -• 
the war, wife^ "^ 



^ -**•* 



|,4U 



% H.avtuion were authorized to pay a 
i^cnty-five dollars to each volun- 
. when mustered into the military 
iK juv*tsi of the town. Another meet- 
*" ui .»c »'ulv, and the selectmen were 
. .ituouul of bounty to '' whoever shall 
?^* * ^^ ^>^i;ttiv* when credited to the town." 



BEVERLY. 177 

= meeting heltl on tlic (!tli of March, it 

'ji* payment of State aid to the families 

' heretofore." 

n 111 in made by the selectmen in 18(>(), 

liit'i^ liiindred and ei«!:htv-foiir men for the 

<\o to be at least one hundred less than the 

: 1 nisliod and credited, as the town filled its 

I V call of the President for men, and at the 

• r had a surplus of nineteen over and above all 

I wcMitv were commissioned officers. The whole 

mtinoy appropriated and expended by the town on 

1 I he war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty thousand 

.Iivd and fifty dollars ($30,<i50.00). 

:^ amount of money raised and expended by the town 

lIiij the vears of the war for aid to the families of soldiers, 

:;iiil which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 

tull..w.s: In 1801, $2,989.86; in 18()2, $9,402.20 ; in 1863, 

$ll,l;53.59; in 1804, $12,200.00; in 1805, $7,000.00. Total 

amount, $42,725.11. 

The ladies of Andover were incessant in their good patriotic 
works for the soldiers. When the Andover company left home 
for the front, they furnished them with under-clothing to the 
value of $225, and furnished them with a Christmas dinner 
in 1801. The ladies of the "Old South Society," and the 
"Ladies' Aid Society,*' furnished at various times hosspital and 
sanitary stores, clothing, and money, to the value of nearly 
twenty-five hundre<l dollars, exclusive of their own labor. 

Beverly. — Incorporated Oct. 14, 1668. Population in 
1860, 6,154; in 1865, 5,944. Valuation in 1860, $3,129,- 
640; in 1865, $3,359,216. 

The selectmen in 1861 were John Pickett, John Meacom, 
Robert S. Foster, Charles Moulton, Zachariah Cole; in 1862, 
John Meacom, John Pickett, Robert S. Foster, Augustus Moul- 
ton, Joseph Wilson ; in 1863, John Meacom, Robert S. Foster, 
Joseph Wilson, John Ober, William G. Woodberry ; in 1864, 
Robert S. Foster, Joseph Wilson, Lawson Walker, James Hill, 

12 



178 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

John T. Ober; in 1865, Joseph Wilson, Robert S. Foster, 
James Hill, Lawson Walker, Elijah E. Lummus. 

The town-clerk during all these years was James Hill, and 
the town-treasurer for the same period was Robert G. Bennett. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters relat- 
ing to the war, was held on the 15th of May, the purpose 
being to see what measures the town would adopt to furnish 
uniforms and other proper articles for members of the military 
company belonging to Beverly, then in the service of the United 
States. It was voted to refer the whole matter to the selectmen, 
with discretionary power to act as they should think proper, 
and to borrow money upon the credit of the town. On motion 
of John I. Baker, it was unanimously — 

Resolved, " That we tender to the officers and soldiers of the Beverly 
Light Infantry, Company E, and all other soldiers from Beverly, now 
absent in the service of the country, our warmest meed of praise, for their 
noble and manly self-sacrifice, in so readily responding to their nation's 
call, and for the skill, energy, perseverance, courage, and ability which 
they, in common with their associates of the Eighth Massachusetts 
Regiment, so faithfully evinced in their triumphal progress and march 
to the nation's capital." 

Resolved, " That we tender to the far-famed Seventh Regiment of 
New York our heartfelt thanks for their many kindnesses to our 
Eighth Massachusetts Regiment, and especially for their liberality 
towards our wounded fellow-citizen. Lieutenant Moses S. Herrick." 

Resolved, '* That our warmest sympathies be tendered to Lieutenant 
Herrick, in his misfortunes, and that we pledge ourselves to him, and to 
all his associates in our Beverly company, and our other Beverly soldiers, 
and to their respective families, to render unto their necessities all the 
material aid and comfort that we can legitimately bestow." 

September 28th, Three thousand dollars were appropriated 
for aid to soldiers' families, and the treasurer was authorized to 
borrow the money. 

1862. July 14th, Voted, to pay to each volunteer who enlists 
for three years' military service, and is credited to the quota of 
the town, a bounty of one hundred dollars. The selectmen were 
authorized to borrow money to pay the same. A committee 



BEVERLY. 179 

consisting of William Endicott, Charles A. Kilham, Joseph E. 
Ober, Daniel Foster, A. N. Clark, B. T. Mansey, Isaac Stud- 
ley, Edwin Foster, Joseph Conant, John Knowlton, Josiah A. 
Haskell, Benjamin E. Cole, John F. Ober, Winthrop T. Porter, 
and John I. Baker, beinc^ one from each school district, and six 
at large, was appointed '^to assist the selectmen in the matter of 
enlistment." August 21st, Voted, to pay to each volunteer for 
nine months' service a bounty of one hundred dollars, when 
mustered in and credited to the town, and *' the same amount to 
all Beverly men now in the active service who have not already 
received a bounty from this town or any other city or town." 
The selectmen having announced that there had been contributed 
by Hon. Charles G. Loring, and others, one thousand dollars 
^ in aid of the families of volunteers for the war, from the town 
of Beverly," a vote was passed thanking the gentlemen for 
their liberal gift. This gift was increased to seventeen hundred 
dollars.* November 5th, The vote of August 21st was so ex- 
tended as to pay one hundred dollars to all Beverly men who 
had enlisted "since the original three months' service of 1861," 
and who had received no bounty, as well to those who had been 
honorably discharged as to those then in service, and to pay the 
same to the Wal heirs of those who had died. 

1864. June 29th, The bounty to three-years volunteers was 
fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained 
until the end of the war. 

Beverly furnished seven hundred and thirty-five men for the 
war, which was a surplus of ninety over and above all demands. 
Thirty-two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifty thousand dollars 
($50,000.00). 



* The money was placed to tlie " Union Fund," which had been raised by 
priTate subscription, which amounted at this time to thirty-six hundred dollars. 
Tbe one thousand dollars were contributed by gentlemen of Boston, who have 
summer residences in Beverly, as follows : Charles G. Loring, S200.00 ; G. How- 
land Shaw, $200.00; Martin Brimmer, $200.00; Richard S. Parker, $100.00; 
Augustus Lowell, $100.00 ; William D. Pickman, $100.00 ; George B. Upton, 
$100.00. 



I 



180 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The amount of money raised and appropriated by the town 
during the years of the war for State aid to the families of vol- 
unteers, and afterwards reimbursed to it by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $3,137.49; in 1862, $11,623.25; in 
1863, $15,391.00; in 1864, $14,431.77; in 1865, $8,800.00. 
Total amount, $53,383.81. 

The ladies of Beverly were active in their good works for the 
soldiers from the beginning to the end of the war. They fur- 
nished each Beverly soldier with comfortable under-clothing, 
sent fifty-five large boxes of articles to the Sanitary Commis- 
sion, and as many more direct to the soldiers at the front. The 
value of these articles in money was about nine thousand 
dollars. 

BoxFORD. — Incorporated Aug. 12, 1685. Population in 
1860, 1,020; in 1865, 868. Valuation in 1860, $649,331; 
in 1865, $631,942. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William R. Cole, William E. 
Killam, John K. Cole; in 1862, William E. Killam, George 
W. Chadwick, Thomas L. SpofFord ; in 1863, John F. Kim- 
ball, William E. Killam, Israel Herrick; in 1864, William E. 
Killam, Joshua T. Day, William R. Cole; in 1865, John F. 
Kimball, Benjamin S. Barnes, Edward Howe. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1863 was William H. Wood; 
in 1862 and 1864, William E. Killam; in 1865, William R. 
Cole. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was William E. 
Killam ; in 1863, William R. Kimball ; in 1864, Joseph H. 
Janes ; in 1865, Joshua T. Day. 

1861. A legal town-meeting was held on the 6th of May, 
at which the selectmen were directed to furnish aid to the fami- 
lies of soldiers ; also, to furnish each volunteer with a good 
outfit, and to pay him, when mustered into service, a sum equal 
to one month's Government pay, to compensate him for time 
spent in drilling. 

1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred 
dollars to each inhabitant of tlie town who shall enlist within 
twenty days for three years' service, and be mustered in to the 
credit of the town. After the expiration of twenty days the 



BOXFORD. 181 

selectmen were authorized to recruit men from any other place, 
and pay a bounty of one hundred dollars. The treasurer was 
authorized to borrow money to pay bounties and to provide aid 
for the families of the soldiers. August 22d, A bounty of two 
hundred and fifty dollars was authorized to be paid to each 
volunteer belonging to the town who should enlist to the credit 
of the town in the nine months' service. The treasurer was 
directed to borrow money to pay the same. 

1863. November 3d, Four hundred dollars were appropri- 
ated for State aid to soldiers' families. December 30th, Voted, 
that two persons be chosen to aid the selectmen in obtaining 
recruits. 

1864. March 5th, The bountv for volunteers for three 
years' service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 
The selectmen were requested to keep on recruiting " without 
one day's delay ; " and the treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money to pay the bounties. July 2d, The selectmen were 
directed to continue to recruit volunteers for the town until the 
Ist of March, 1865, in anticipation of any future call for men 
by the President of the United States, the bounty not to exceed 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer. The • 
treasurer was authorized to borrow money. 

1865. March 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
one thousand dollars to pay State aid to the families of volun- 
teers during the year. 

Boxford furnished ninety-two men for th^ war, which was 
a surplus of five over and above all demands. There were no 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclu- 
sive of State aid, was ten thousand seven hundred and fifty-six 
dollars and thirty-five cents ($10,756.35). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 
volunteers, and which was afterwards repaid to it by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $367.60; in 1862, 
$1,170.00; in 1863, $1,184.00; in 1864, $1,097.71; in 1865, 
$1,150.00. Total amount, $4,969.31. 

The ladies of Boxford were active all throusfh the war in 



182 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

adding to the comfort of the soldiers at the ront, and forwarded 
through the Sanitary and Christian Commissions on several occa- 
sions under-clothing, quilts, pillow-cases, dried apples, jellies, 
newspapers, and other comforts for the sick and wounded. 

Bradford. — Incorporated , 1675. Population in 1860, 

1,688; in 1865, 1,567. Valuation in 1860, $832,633; in 
1865, $832,083. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Richard Hazeltine, Samuel W. 
Hopkinson, Leverett Kimball ; in 1862, Edmund Kimball, 
John Perley, Samuel W. Hopkinson ; in 1863, Samuel W. 
Hopkinson, Walter Goodell, Nathaniel Carleton ; in 1864 and 
1865, Charles B. Emerson, John Perley, A. Judson Day. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Nathaniel 
Hatch. The town-treasurer in 1861, and until Aug. 19, 1862, 
was William Tenney ; and from that time until the present, 
1871, Harvey M. Fowle. 

1861. At the annual town- meeting held on the 26th of 
April, one thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to the 
families of citizens who have entered into active military ser- 
vice, or who may " hereafter volunteer in the military service 
of their country ; " and E. F. Brigham and George Johnson 
were chosen to act with the selectmen in distributing the money 
appropriated. 

1862. On the 17th of March the selectmen were author- 
ized to borrow money necessary to furnish State aid to the 
families of volunteers, to be distributed in accordance with the 
law of the Commonwealth. July 21st, The selectmen were 
directed to " raise money to pay each person now resident of 
Bradford, who shall enlist and be accepted within three weeks, 
the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars," the sum to be paid 
when the volunteer is accepted and mustered in, " which sum 
shall be in addition to all other bounty and pay." They were 
also authorized to borrow money to aid the widows and chil- 
dren, living in the town, of volunteers who have died in the ser- 
vice of their country. August 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of 
two hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine 
months' service, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of 



BRADFORD. 183 

the town ; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money to 
pay the same. September 27th, The selectmen were author- 
ized to pay the same amount to men who may be drafted and 
credited to the town. December 16th, They were directed to 
fill the quota of the town by enlisting volunteers either for three 
years' or nine months* service at their discretion, "not paying 
over two hundred dollars to each man." 

1863. March 16th, The treasurer was directed to borrow 
money for assistance to the families of deceased soldiers who 
had been inhabitants of Bradford ; and the selectmen were au- 
thorized to issue bonds at five per cent interest, of denomina- 
tions not less than one hundred dollars, to the amount of fifteen 
thousand dollars, — the same to run from five to ten years, — 
for the purpose of funding the floating debt of the town. 
October 17th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money 
for the payment of State aid to the families of drafted men. 
November 3d, The selectmen were directed to enlist twenty 
men for the military service, the bounties for whom to be raised 
by private subscription. 

1864. March 21st, The treasurer, under the direction of 
the selectmen, was authorized to borrow money " to i>ay State 
aid to the families of volunteers, drafted men, soldiers in the 
regular army, and to families of deceased and discharged sol- 
diers," who belonged to, or were credited to the quota of, the 
town. April 21st, The selectmen were directed to pay at their 
discretion a bounty to each new recruit not to exceed one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars, who should be accepted and 
credited to the quota of the town ; and the assessors were in- 
structed to assess a tax for that special purpose. August 20th, 
The town passed by a unanimous vote a resolution thanking 
the selectmen *' for their energy and success in filling tiie quota 
of the town." November 8th, One of the articles in the town- 
warrant was " to see if the town would authorize the selectmen 
to pay out of the town treasury the expenses of getting home 
the bodies of soldiers belonging to Bradford, and the funeral 
charges of those who have died, or may die, in the military 
service of their country during the war ; also, to refund to 
those who have paid the expenses incurred for such purposes. 



I 



184 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

whenever the selectmen deem the charges just and proper, and 
provided also that the next of kin to the deceased soldier 
desires such expenses to be paid." After discussion, the whole 
matter was left to the discretion of the selectmen to act as they 
might deem proper. 

Bradford, according to a return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished one hundred and seven men for the war, which 
was at least sixty less than the real number furnished and 
credited, as it had a surplus, over and above all demands, of 
thirty-one at the end of the war. Four were commissioned 
officers. The total amount of money appropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was twenty-two thousand one hundred and forty-nine dol- 
lars and forty-two cents. In addition to this amount, eight 
thousand seven hundred and fifty-six dollars and sixty-three 
cents were raised by private subscription, making a total amount 
of thirty thousand nine hundred and six dollars and five cents 
($30,906.05). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
for State aid to the families of volunteers during the years of 
the war, and which was afterwards refunded to it by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $654.68; in 1862, 
$2,475.13; in 1863, $3,185.22; in 1864, $3,000.00; in 
1865, $2,600.00. Total amount, $11,915.03. 

The ladies of Bradford durinof the war formed " a large sew- 
ing-circle " which met as often as once a week to prepare arti- 
cles for the soldiers. Several fairs were held under their 
superintendence, at which considerable sums were raised, which 
were expended in furnishing comfortable articles for the sick 
and wounded. 

Danvers. — Incorporated June 16, 1757. Population in 
1860, 5,110 ; in 1865, 5,144. Valuation in 1860, $2,455,948; 
in 1865, $2,237,630. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Francis Dodge, William Dodge, 
Jr., Charles Chaplin; in 1862, William Dodge, Jr., Charles 
Chaplin, Augustus Fowler; in 1863, Jacob F. Perry, John A. 
Putnam, James A. Perry; in 1864 and 1865, Jacob F. Perry, 
William Dodge, Jr., John A. Putnam. 



DANVERS. 185 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was A. Sum- 
ner Howard. The town-treasurer during the same period was 
William L. Weston, 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act on matters relat- 
ing to the war, was held on the 3d of May, at which it was — 

Resolved, By the citizens of Danvers, in town-meeting assembled, 
that we will co-operate, to the fullest extent in our power, with all good 
citizens throughout the country, in prosecuting the war with such vigor 
as to bring it to a speedy close. 

Resolved, That, animated by the glorious memories of the past, our 
duly to posterity, our love for the Union, our reliance upon a just God 
in a righteous cause, we will devote our whole energies to the accom- 
plishment of the object, regardless of its cost in treasure or in blood. 

Resolved, That in this contest there can be no neutrality, whoever 
is not for us is against us ; and that all bearing arms not ranged beneath 
the flag of the Union, wherever found, shall be dealt with as traitors. 

Resolved, That the treasurer of the town be authorized to borrow, 
not exceeding ten thousand dollars, for the uses of the town for the 
above purposes, which shall be designated as a War Fund. 

Daniel Richards, John R. Langley, Charles P. Preston, E. 
Hunt, Samuel P. Fowler, together with the selectmen, were 
appointed with full power to disburse said fund for the encour- 
agement of recruiting and the support of the families of those 
who should enlist.* December 2l8t, Five thousand dollars 
were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. 

18 ()2. March 17th, Fifteen thousand dollars were appro- 
priated for State aid during the year to soldiers' families, and 
five hundred dollars were added to the War Fund. July 25th, 
A bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars was authorized 
to be paid to each volunteer who shall be mustered into the 
military service for three years, and credited to the quota of the 
town. August 25th, The same amount of bounty was directed 
to be paid to volunteers for nine months' service ; and the select- 
men were requested to open a recruiting-office. September 11th, 
The same bounty was authorized to be paid to any inhabitant, or 



• At this meeting nearly twenty-four hundred dollars were raised by private 
•ubscription, for material and supplies. The ladles formed themselves into one 
general sewing-circle, and made uniforms for two full military companies. 



186 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

his legal representative, who had enlisted for three years, and 
after nine months' service been honorably discharged, who had 
not already received said bounty. It was also voted to pay the 
same bounty to men who may be drafted. September 17th, 
The same bounty was authorized to be paid " to each resident of 
Danvers enlisting in Captain Allen's Company," when mustered 
in and credited to the town. At this meeting the following 
resolution was adopted : — 

Resolved,, That had there been no slavery, there would have been 
no rebellioD ; and as the Rebellion will continue as long as slavery exists, 
we, the citizens of Danvers, ask that the war forced upon us by the 
rebels, in defence of slavery, shall be so prosecuted as to leave no ves- 
tige of that accursed institution* 

1863. March 2d, Twenty thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated for State aid to soldiers' families. March 16th, The 
selectmen " were authorized to purchase a lot in Walnut-Grove 
Cemetery for the burial of deceased soldiers." August 8th, 
Voted, to appropriate not exceeding fifty thousand dollars " to 
meet the expenditure contemplated by the votes of the town 
passed on the 11th of September, 1862."* 

1864. March 7 th, Fifteen thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated for State aid to soldiers' families. March 24th, The 
citizens' committee made a report in regard to the war, the con- 
cluding paragraph of which was as follows : " If the heads of 
departments, and other politicians at the capital, interest them- 
selves as heartily in crushing the Rebellion as in making a new 
President, our honored flag will soon wave in triumph over a 
regenerated Union, inhabited only by freemen." July 28th, 
Eleven thousand two hundred and fifty dollars were appropri- 
ated to furnish the quota of the town under the recent call of the 
President for more men. Six thousand three hundred and 
forty-two dollars were added to this appropriation by private 
subscriptions. 

1865. Fifteen thousand dollars were appropriated for State 
aid to soldiers' families. 

Danvers furnished seven hundred and ninety-two men for the 

* No money was paid under this vote, the Supreme Court having granted 
an iig unction. See KeporU, 8th Allen, page 80. 



ESSEX. 187 

war, which was a surplus of thirty-six over and above all 
demands. Forty-four were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid to soldiers' families, 
was thirty-six thousand five hundred and ninety-six dollars 
($3G,596.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers* 
families, and which was afterwards repaid to it by the Common- 
wealth, wa« as follows: In 1861, $6,579.37 ; in 1862, $17,- 
692.14; in 1863, $18,566.90; in 1864, $15,352.70; in 1865, 
$7,877.00. Total amount, $66,068.11. 

The ladies of Danvers were unceasing in their good works for 
the soldiers all through«the war. 

A soldiers' monument has been erected in the town at a cost 
of sixty-three hundred dollars : part of the money was appro- 
priated by the town, and a part was raised by private subscrip- 
tion. Edwin Mudge, Esq., gave his pay for two years as a 
member of the Legislature to the object. It bears upon it the 
names of ninety-five Danvers men who died in the service of 
their country during the war. The town also appropriated 
fifteen hundred dollars for the purchase and grading a lot in 
Walnut-Grove Cemetery in Danvers for a burial-place for her 
deceased soldiers and sailors. 

Essex. — Incorporated Feb. 18, 1819. Population in 1860, 
1,701; in 1865, 1,630. Valuation in 1860, $930,368; in 
1865, $912,417. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Jacob K. Roberts, Addison 
Cogswell, Warren Eveleth ; in 1862, Daniel W. Bartlett, 
Hervey Burnham, Jacob Burnham ; in 1863 and 1864, Daniel 
W. Bartlett, Abel Story, Jr., Addison Cogswell; in 1865, 
Daniel W. Bartlett, Nehemiah Burnham, Charles B. Allen. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was O. H. P. Sargent ; in 1862, 
1863, 1864, and 1865, John C. Choate. The town-treasurer 
during all of these years was Grover Dodge. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 17th of June ; at which 



188 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

one thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of State 
aid during the year to the families of volunteers, to be paid in 
accordance with the act of the Legislature recently passed. 

1862. August, The town authorized the selectmen to pay a 
bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who should 
enlist in the military service of the United States, and be mus- 
tered in and credited to the quota of the town. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in 
its corporate capacity, upon matters relating to the war during 
this year. 

1864. November 19th, The town voted to pay each volun- 
teer who should enlist in the military service for three years, 
and be credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars ; which does not appear to have 
been chancjed durino: the existence of the war. 

1865. At the annual meeting in March five thousand dol- 
lars were appropriated for State aid to the families of volunteers 
during the year. 

Essex, according to the return made by the selectmen in 
1860, furnished eighty-six men for the war. The real number 
was about one hundred and seventy, which was a surplus of 
eleven over and above all demands. Two were commissioned 
oflScers. The whole amount of money appropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was thirty-four thousand three hundred and two dollars 
($34,302.00). 

The amount of money raised by the town and expended 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 
volunteers, and which was afterwards reimbursed to it by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $341.25; in 1862, 
$3,797.73 ; in 1863, $5,147.24 ; in 1864, $3,941.53 ; in 1865, 
$2,378.86. Total amount, $15,606.61. 

The ladies of Essex formed a Soldiers' Aid Society early in the 
war, to aid the volunteers and their families, which continued 
in active existence until the end. 

Georgetoavn. — Incorporated April 21, 1838. Population 
in 1860, 2,075; in 1865, 1,926. Valuation in 1860, $730,- 
297 ; in 1865, $760,473. 



GEORGETOWN. 189 

The selectmen in 1861, and all through the war, were O. B. 
Tenney, Sherman Nelson, George W. Sanborn. 

The town-clerk for the same period was Charles E. Jewett. 
The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Lewis H. Bateman ; 
in 1863, William H. Harriman ; in 1864 and 1865, George 
H. Carleton. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held April 30th, at which it was voted 
to appropriate five thousand dollars " for the benefit of such of 
the citizens as may volunteer in the service of their country 
during the ensuing years, and their families." A committee of 
one from each school district was ap[)ointed " to ascertain what 
supplies may be needed" by the volunteers or their families, 
and all bills approved by the committee were to be paid by the 
selectmen. The committee were also directed to aid in the for- 
mation, equipment, and drill of a military company in the 
town. October 2d, The committee reported they had expended 
for uniforms, equipments, and in aid to families of volunteers, 
eleven hundred dollars. 

1862. July 17th, Voted, to pay to residents of the town a 
bounty of one hundred dollars, who shall enlist for three years 
in the military service. The treasurer was authorized to bor- 
row money to pay the same. August 9th, The bounty was 
raised to one hundred and fifty dollars, and those who had 
already enlisted were to receive an additional fifty dollars. 
The vote restricting the enlistments to citizens of the town was 
reconsidered, and the selectmen were authorized to receive 
recruits from other places. Voted, to oflTer a reward of ten 
dollars for the arrest of any person liable to be drafted *' who 
shall absent himself from the State before such draft is made." 
August 16th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred and fifty 
dollars for volunteers for nine months* service ; and that the 
selectmen be limited in recruiting to eight days from date to 
residents of the town exclusively, after that to any one who 
may legally be counted to the quota of Georgetown. The 
treasurer was authorized to borrow money. John G. Barnes, 
Solomon Nelson, and John P. Bradstreet were appointed "to 
confer with other towns in regard to forming a company." 



190 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

November 4th, Five hundred dollars were appropriated "for 
the benefit of disabled and discharged volunteers and their fam- 
ilies, living in this town." 

1863. Nothing of general interest appears to have been 
done during this year. Recruiting was continued, and boun- 
ties were paid to volunteers. 

1864. April 26th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who has been mus- 
tered into the military service to the credit of the town since 
the 1st of April. June 28th, Voted, to pay the same bounty 
till Jan. 1, 1865. November 14th, The town ratified the 
action of the selectmen in paying a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars each to ten men who had enlisted for one 
year ; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money. 

1865. June 3d, Voted, to "reimburse the money paid by 
voluntary subscription towards filling the quota of the town." 
The same to be paid Oct. 1, 1865. 

Georgetown furnished one hundred and ninety-four men for 
the war, which was a surplus of twenty-six over and above all 
demands. Six were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town for war 
purposes, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-four thousand 
two hundred and seventeen dollars and ninety-nine cents 
($24,217.99). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' fam- 
ilies, and which was afterwards repaid to it by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows : In 1861, $1,470.87 ; in 1862, $4,720,- 
42; in 1863, $5,597.60; in 1864, $5,185.50; in 1865, 
$3,850.00. Total amount, $20,824.39. 

The ladies' sewing-circle connected with the Orthodox Congre- 
gational Church were untiring in their eflforts. The treasurer, 
Mrs. William S. Homer, informs us that '' early in the autumn 
of 1861 the ladies commenced knitting socks and mittens, mak- 
ing shirts, &c. The first contribution was sent to the Sanitary 
Commission, and about the same time we forwarded two boxes 
to the Nineteenth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers ; and as 
many as twenty smaller packages were sent by individuals on 



GLOUCESTER. 191 

tlieir own account to Doctor Howe, or the regiments in the field. 
During the first months of winter we sent to the Sanitary 
Commission four boxes of garments and bedding valued at four 
hundred and fifty dollars. In the spring of 18()2 we collected 
for the Sanitary Commission one hundred dollars, and at vari- 
ous times sent barrels and boxes of supplies valued at eight 
hundred dollars : we also sent knother box to the Nineteenth 
Regiment. During 1863 we sent barrels of clothing, boxes of 
books, and supplies for the Sanitary and Christian Commis- 
sions, amounting in value to about three hundred and fifty dol- 
lars. During the year 18(54 we sent about twenty barrels, 
boxes, and packages, which were equally distributed to the 
Sanitary and Christian Commissions, to Surgeon-General Dale, 
and to Mrs. Mary B. Dully for the hospital at Hampden, Vir- 
ginia, value in all about four hundred and eighty dollars ; also, 
fifty dollars in cash to the Christian Commission . We also sent 
in 18()5 about ten barrels to those various points valued at 
three hundred and fifty dollars. The total, as near as can be 
ascertained, is about twenty-five hundred dollars. Contribu- 
tions were made by other societies to the amount of about two 
hundred dollars." 

Gloucester. — Incorporated May 22, 1639. Population 
in.l860, 10,904; in 1865, 11,938. Valuation in 1860, $4,- 
171,942; in 1865, $4,505,390. 

The selectmen in 1861 were John S. Webber, David Allen, 
Jr., Edward C. Hoyt; in 1862, Charles C. Pettingell, Addi- 
son Gilbert, Edward C. Hoyt; in 1863, Gorham P. Low, 
Charles C. Pettingell, Edward C. Hoyt ; in 1864, William A. 
Pew, Edward C. Hoyt, Gorham P. Low ; in 1865, Addison 
Gilbert, Edward C. Hoyt, William P. Dolliver. 

The town-clerk during all these years was Henry Center, and 
the town-treasurer for the same period was T. Sewall Lan- 
caster. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters con- 
nected with the war, was held on the 24th of April. The follow- 
ing resolutions were presented to the meeting by J. P. Trask, 
Esq. , and unanimously adopted : — 



i 



192 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Resolved, By the inhabitants of the town of Gloucester, in legal 
town-meeting assembled, that while we are utterly and unalterably 
opposed to oppression in all forms and circumstances, and especially the 
holding of human beings in bondage, we nevertheless fully recognize 
the compromises of the Constitution of the United States, and ever 
have, and now do fully and freely accord to those States in which 
slavery exists by law all their constitutional rights and privileges in 
ike Union. 

Resolvedy That those States which have adopted ordinances of 
secession have violated their plighted faith to the Union, and in making 
war upon the Federal Government, and by armed force prevented it 
from furnishing to those employed in its service the means of sub- 
sistence, and by their proclamation invited the indiscriminate destruc- 
tion of property, they have exhibited all their meanness and cowardice, 
without any of the better qualities of the rkbel, the traitor, and 

the PIRATE. 

Resolved^ That the threat that the Palmetto Flag shall yet wave 
over our *• Cradle of Liberty " partakes of the same qualities which 
threatened the roll-call of the slave master shall yet be heard in the 
shadow of the monument on Bunker Hill ; which threatened the assassin- 
ation of the President elect; which threatened to prevent his inaugura- 
tion ; which has threatened to overthrow his administration ; which has 
threatened to destroy the capital ; which has bombarded Fort Sumter; 
which has excited the mob to resist the passage of the military through 
the city of Baltimore, though its mission was only to assist in defending 
the capital against the invasion of rebel forces. 

Resolved^ That the blood of our murdered fellow-citizens calls loudly 
and imperatively upon every lover of his country and of Liberty, to 
rally to the support, maintenance, and defence of all those who are or 
may be engaged in defence of the Federal Government. Therefore — 

Resolved, That the sum of ten thousand dollars be, and hereafter is, 
appropriated by the town of Gloucester, to be expended in providing 
for the clothing, support, and maintenance of such of our fellow-citizens 
as have enlisted or may enlist in the service of the Federal Government, 
and of their faipilies who remain among us. 

Resolved, That we hereby, one and all, pledge ourselves to support 
the Federal Government at all hazards. 

John S. E. Rogers, Charles Fitz, John W. Low, Ebon H. 
Stacy, and George W. Plumer were appointed to act as a com- 
mittee of distribution, and to have the supervision of the money 
appropriated under the fifth resolution. 



GLOUCESTER. 193 

1862. February 3d, The Committee of Distribution having 
reported that their duties had ended, a vote was passed thank- 
ing them for the acceptable manner in which they had performed 
their labors ; and James Davis, Gorham P. Low, and Thomas J. 
Foster were appointed to consider the best method of disbursing 
the relief fund. State aid was authorized to be paid to the 
families of men who had enlisted in the two Bay-State regi- 
ments.* March 21st, Twenty thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated for State aid to soldiers' families, to be expended under the 
direction of the selectmen. July 23d, The selectmen were 
authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to 
each volunteer who enlists for three years' service, and is credited 
to the quota of the town. August 20th, The selectmen were 
authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each vol- 
unteer who enlists for nine months, and is credited to the quota 
of the town. The treasurer was directed to borrow money to 
pay the same. 

1863. A town-meeting was held on the 13th of July, at 
which the town voted to appropriate three thousand dollars for 
the defences of Gloucester harbor, to be expended under the 
direction of the selectmen, with the approval of the Governor 
and Council. At another meeting held on the 27th of October, 
three thousand dollars additional were appropriated for the same 
purpose. 

1864. A special town-meeting was held on the 27th of 
June, when it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three 
years, and be credited to the quota of Gloucester. This 
amount of bounty continued to be paid until the end of the 
war. 

Gloucester, according to a return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished eight hundred and fifty-two men for the war, 
which evidently did not include all who were in the navy. 
Gloucester must have furnished nearly twelve hundred men for 

* These were regiments raised by Major- General Butler, and at this time 
were not credited to the quota of the State, and therefore a doubt existed 
whether their families could be paid State aid under the law. Thej were after- 
wards properly credited. 

18 



194 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

the army and navy, as it filled its quota on every call of the 
President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of one hun- 
dred and fifty-eight over and above all demands. Fifty-six 
were commissioned oflScers in the military service. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifty-six thou- 
sand nine hundred and sixty-four dollars ($56,964.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the years of the war for State aid to the families of 
soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,706.21; in 1862, $19,- 
994.81 ; in 1863, $23,562.21 ; in 1864, $18,500.00 ; in 1865, 
$11,300.00. Total amount, $76,064.23. 

In no town in the Commonwealth, of its population and 
means, were the ladies more active, generous, and patriotic in 
behalf of the soldiers, than were the ladies of Gloucester. 
We regret our inability to obtain a full statement of their good 
works. 

Groveland. — Incorporated March 8, 1850. Population in 
1860, 1,448 ; in 1865, 1,620. Valuation in 1860, $538,123; 
in 1865, $666,119. 

The selectmen during the years 1861 and 1862 were Nathan- 
iel Ladd, Solomon SpofTord, C. W. Hopkinson ; in 1863, 
Nathaniel Ladd, C. W. Hopkinson, Samuel Balch ; in 1864, 
Nathaniel Ladd, Z. C. Wardwell, C. W. Hopkinson. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was 
Morris Spofford. 

1861. The first meeting in Groveland, to consider matters 
connected with the war, was held April 30th, at which E. B. 
George, Elijah Clarke, John C. Foote, N. H. GriflSth, and 
D. H. Stickney were chosen " to furnish all persons who are 
called into active service from this town with all necessary arti- 
cles, and to provide for their families during their absence ; " 
also, '* that all volunteers from this town in regularly organized 
companies, holding themselves liable to instant call to the 
service of their country, and in constant drill to prepare 
themselves for service, be paid ten dollars a month while so 



OROYELAND. 195 

employed." June 22dt Voted, that all volunteers "entitled 
to pay for drilling be paid to this day, and that hereafter no 
money shall be paid for drilling ; " also voted, " to transfer the 
duties of the committee chosen at the last meeting to the 
selectmen." 

1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer, ^ to the number of twenty-one," who 
shall ** enlist from this town " for three years, " said bounty to 
be paid upon the production of satisfactory evidence of enlist- 
ment and mustering in as above;" voted, "that the payment 
of the above bounty be limited to those who enlist in the month 
of July." July 26th, Voted, to authorize the selectmen " to 
pay fifty dollars, in addition to the amount previously voted, to 
all residents that have, or may, volunteer from this town pre- 
vious to the 1st of August next." The following resolution 
was also passed, and recorded upon the town records : — 

Resolved^ That we have learned with pain and sadness of the priva- 
tions and sufferings of our soldiers in the late battles before Richmond, 
especially those who went from our midst; that they all deserve our 
deepest sympathy and highest gratitude for the heroic bravery and 
unyielding fortitude with which they met the trials of that terrible 
carnage ; and that we will ever revere the memory of our townsman, 
Charles Boynton, who died in the thickest of the fight facing the foe. 

August 13th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
fifty dollars for nine-months volunteers, " under the recent call 
of the President for three hundred thousand militia." The 
selectmen were instructed ** to pay fifty dollars in money to each 
person, provided he shall require that amount; and that they 
give the note of the town-treasurer, payable on demand after 
one year, with interest from date, for the balance." December 
12th, It was voted "that the town pay no further bounty for 
nine-months men ; " " that the selectmen procure three-years 
men to fill the quota of the town, and inform the Adjutant- 
General that the town has rescinded the bounty offered for nine- 
months men, and will endeavor to procure three-years men to 
fill its quota." 

1863. August 17th, Voted, that the selectmen be author- 
ized to hire money to pay aid to the families of drafted men. 



196 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1864. April 8th, The treasurer, under the direction of the 
selectmen, was authorized to borrow money sufficient " to pay 
a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer for three years' service, as will enlist to the credit of the 
town under the pending call of the President for two hundred 
thousand men." June 25th, The same officers were authorize<l 
to borrow money and pay the same bounty for volunteers in 
anticipation of another call for more men by the President. 
August 13th, A citizens' meeting was held : a committee was 
appointed " to circulate a subscription paper to raise a fund for 
the payment of bounties to volunteers, in addition to the one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars voted by the town." An 
adjourned meeting was held August 15th. The committee 
reported that thirteen hundred and sixty-four dollars had been 
collected from one hundred and twenty subscribers. The money 
and subscription list were given to the selectmen. 

1865. February 16th, The selectmen were authorized to 
enlist men to fill the quota of the town, and to draw upon the 
treasurer for the necessary funds. 

Groveland furnished about one hundred and eighty-five men 
for the war, which was a surplus of seventeen over and above all 
demands. Seven were commissioned officers. The total amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town for war pur- 
poses, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-seven thousand eight 
hundred and twelve dollars and fifty-seven cents ($27,812.57). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, 
and afterwards reimbursed to it by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $764.08; in 1862, $2,544.56; in 1863, 
$3,403.96; in 1864, $3,557.33; in 1865, $3,000.00. Total 
amount, $13,269.93. 

Hamilton. — Incorporated June 21, 1793. Population in 
1860, 789; in 1865, 800. Valuation in 1860, $449,810; in 
1865, $481,423. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Daniel E. Saffbrd, Samuel 
Adams, Benjamin W. Patch ; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Wil- 
liam A. Brown, John Whipple, 2d, Alvin Smith; in 1865, 
Nathaniel B. Butler, George B. Dodge, Stephen G. Hiler. 



HAMILTON. 197 

The town-clerk during all these years was Joseph P. Lover- 
ing. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was George Apple- 
ton ; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Daniel E. Safford. 

1861. The first legal town -meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 3d of May, when it was 
voted to raise one thousand dollars, as *'a contingent fund for 
the assistance of volunteers, and in aid of their families ; '* 
each volunteer to receive twenty dollars when mustered into 
service, and ten dollars a month in addition to his Government 
pay as long as he continues in the service, and his family to be 
provided for during the same period. The treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow the money. 

1862. June 23d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
one thousand dollars to aid the families of volunteers. July 
23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each 
volunteer who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town, and a 
bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each of those who 
shall enlist within thirty days. August 18th, The bounty was 
fixed at one hundred and fifty dollars, to be paid to any j)erson 
enlisting to the credit of the town, "whether citizen of the 
town or not, until the quota of the town be filled." The treas- 
urer was authorized to borrow money. August 25th, The 
same bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers enlisting for 
nine months' service. September 1st, The bounty to volunteers 
was raised to two hundred dollars. 

1863. March 10th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
two thousand dollars for aid to the soldiers' families. 

1864. July 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to any "person who shall enlist under 
the pending call of the President, "or any which may be 
issued after the 1st of July, 1864, and before the first day of 
March, 1865," to be paid when the men are accepted, credited, 
and mustered in ; " provided that, if the said bounty shall have 
been advanced in good faith by any citizen, upon satisfactory 
proof thereof it shall be repaid by the town to the person by 
whom it was advanced." The treasurer wjis authorized to bor- 
row such sums of money as might be required to carry the 
above votes into effect. 



198 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1865. April 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, 
not exceeding three thousand dollars, for State aid to the fami- 
lies of volunteers. August 18th, Voted, to refund the sum of 
eighteen hundred dollars ''to such persons as contributed the 
same in aid of, and for filling the quota of, this town under 
the calls of the President made in 1864." 

Hamilton furnished, according to the returns made by the 
selectmen in 1866, seventy-six men for the war, which is very 
nigh the exact number, and which was a surplus of eleven over 
and above all demands. Two were commissioned officers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town for military purposes during the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was eight thousand two hundred and forty-five dollars 
($8,245.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to 
the families of volunteers, and which was afterwards repaid to 
it by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $352.89 ; 
in 1862, $1,507.28 ; in 1863, $1,862.00 ; in 1864, $1,904.00 ; 
in 1865, $1,099.80. Total amount, $6,725,97. 

Haverhill. — Incorporated, 1645. Population in 1860, 
9,995 ; in 1865, 10,660. Valuation in 1860, $5,450,782 ; in 
1865, $4,448,107. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Robert G. Walker, Levi Tay- 
lor, Nathan S. Kimball ; in 1862, Nathan S. Kimball, Levi 
Taylor, Amos A. Sargent; in 1863 and 1864, Levi Taylor, 
Amos A. Sargent, David D. Chase; in 1865, Nathan S. Kim- 
ball, Levi Taylor, David Boynton. 

The town-clerk and town- treasurer during the years 1861, 
1862, and 1863, was Addison B. Jaques ; during 1864 and 
1865, Calvin Battrick. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 2d of May ; at which Hon. 
Alfred Kittridge presented the following preamble and resolu- 
tions which were adopted : — 

Whereas the President of the United States has called upon the 
several States of the Union for volunteers to suppress a Rebellion, and 



HAVERHILL. 199 

to possess and hold the forts and other property of the Govcmment, 
and to sustain the laws, and maintain the Union in its integrity ; and 
wherecu many of our fellow-citizens have responded to the call of the 
President with great promptness and alacrity, and many of them are 
in actual military service for their country, and many more are ready 
to enter said service as soon as called for : therefore — 

Resolved, That the town will make such provision for the families 
of said volunteers as their circumstances may require. 

The town then voted to appropriate a sum not exceeding ten 
thousand dollars "for the above purposes." The selectmen 
were directed to aid volunteers in procuring uniforms ; and 
Alfred Kittridge, Jackson B. Swett, Eben D. Bailey, George 
W. Lee, Jacob How, Levi Taylor, Eli J. Sawins, Charles W. 
Chase, Moses E. Emerson, and George W. Kelley were ap- 
pointed to see that suitable provision was made for the comfort 
and support of the soldiers' families. The treasurer under the 
direction of the selectmen was authorized to borrow money to 
carry into effect the votes of the town. 

1862. July 19th, The selectmen were authorized to open a 
recruiting-office, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each 
volunteer who should enlist for three years' military service, 
when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, and 
to provide for the maintenance of the soldiers' families accord- 
ing to law, also for the widows and children of deceased 
soldiers. Alfred Kittredge, George Wingate Chase, Robert 
Hassall, and James H. Carleton were appointed " to draft suita- 
ble resolutions in honor of those who have fallen on the field of 
battle from this town, and report at the next town-meeting." 
On motion of Rev. J. W. Hanson, N. S. Kimball, Levi 
Taylor, A. A. Sargent, A. B. Jaques, and George W. Chase 
were appointed to prepare and keep a record of the names of 
the soldiers belonging to Haverhill, to be called "The Roll 
OF Honor." August 15th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two 
hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' service, to 
the number not exceeding three full companies, said bounty to 
be paid when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. 
September 15th, The following resolutions prepared by a com- 
mittee appointed at a previous meeting were read, and unani- 
mously adopted : — 



200 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Resohedy That in the death of Major Henry Jackson How, Lib- 
erty has lost a heroic champion, the country a gallant leader, and the 
town a chivalric, noble, and generous citizen. 

Resolved^ That we, the citizens of Haverhill, in town-meeting 
assembled, tender to the family of the deceased our heart-felt sympa- 
thy ; and, while we moura with them the loss of the departed hero, we 
would cherish his memory, and emulate his example. 

Resolvedy That Mr. James H. Caileton be a committee to request 
of the family of Major How his battle-sword as a legacy to the town, 
to be suspended over or near the speaker's desk, in the town hall, and 
to be labelled, " The battle-sword of Major Henry Jackson How, who 
fell in front of Richmond while gloriously defending the Constitution 
and flag of his countr}'." 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered on the town records, 
and a copy of the same transmitted to the family of the deceased.* 

Resolved, That we recognize, in the names of those who on the 
battle-field and by the wayside have fallen in defence of their 
country, martyrs to the same sacred cause of Liberty : gratefully 
will we cherish their names, and honor ourselves by perpetuating them 
to posterity. 

Resolved, That the town-clerk be instructed to keep a correct record 
of those who have or may enlist from this town ; and when the war 
shall be closed, and the record made up, we shall cause to be erected 
in the town hall, near the speaker's desk, a tablet, on which shall be 
inscribed, over the names of those who have fallen, " Martyrs to 
TiiK Sacrki) Cause of Liberty who perished in the Great 
Rkhkllion." 

18(14. April 16th, The bounty to volunteers for three years' 
service, who should enlist under any call of the President pre- 
vious to March I, 1865, was fixed at one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. On the 
tUli i>f Au<just it was voted to pay the bounty in gold. August 
S7th, Voted, to raise a contingent fund of seventy -five thousand 
itolliirs* for recruiting purposes and the payment of bounty. 

I8t5ft, March 13th, The selectmen were instructed to con- 



• Mt^jur I low mtvihI ill the Twenty-Second Regiment Massachusetts Volun- 
Wvr«. Atul wHd i\x\v uf the hravest and most promising: of our young officers. 
Kv ^nkituAttMl Ht Unrvanl College in the class of 1859, and was killed at the 
NiUi^ \^i'liU'iuUU\ beiori* Uichmoiid, June 80, 1802, *' nobly facing the foe." A 
>X\'Wh s4' tkU hill and nervice is published iu " The Harvard Memorial." 



HAVERHILL. 201 

tinue enlisting men in anticipation of any future calls for 
volunteers. 

Haverhill furnished about thirteen hundred men for the 
war, which was a surplus of eighty-five over and above all 
demands. Seventy-three were commissioned oflScers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was one 
hundred and eighteen thousand one hundred and thirty-five dol- 
lars and forty-nine cents ($118,135.49). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to 
the families of volunteers, and which was afterwards refunded 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $8,941.20; 
in 1862, $29,316.82; in 1863, $31,284.22; in 1864, $26,- 
000.00; in 1865, $19,000.00. Total amount, $114,542.24. 

The Ladies' Soldiers' Relief Society of Haverhill and Brad- 
ford was formed on the 22d of April, 1861, in the chapel of 
the Xorth Congregational Church, with Mrs. E. P. Hill as 
president, Mrs. James Noyes vice-president, and Mrs. Edmund 
C. Fletcher as secretary and treasurer. The lady directors 
were chosen from each of the religious societies, and the ladies 
of Bradford were invited to unite with them. Committees were 
also appointed to solicit subscriptions. Among the first work 
done by the society was making woollen shirts and fatigue uni- 
forms for the two companies belonging to the town. One of 
these was Company D, which went out with the Fifth Regi- 
ment in the three months' service. They also made a hand- 
some gray, full-dress uniform for Captain Day's company, which 
was attached to the Seventeenth Regiment three-years volunteers, 
which left the State in August, 1861. But the principal part of 
the labor was in making articles of comfort, and furnishing sup- 
plies for the soldiers not generally furnished by the Government. 
Of these, during the four years of the war, were the following, 
which were properly forwarded to the army: 625 sheets, 113 
quilts and blankets, 396 pillows, 15 bed-sacks, 1,998 shirts, 
527 prs. drawers, 1,456 prs. socks, 112 dressing-gowns, 2,962 
towels, 2,081 handkerchiefs, 45 prs. suspenders, 112 coats, 47 
prs. pants, 51 vests, 142 prs. mittens, 215 prs. slippers, 815 



202 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

hats, 213 sleeping-caps, 26 body aprons, 623 camp-bags, 
515 slings, 1,341 rolls of cotton and linen pieces, 2,955 rolls of 
bandages, 40 compresses, 68 finger-cots, 32 fans, 81 canes and 
crutches, 245 havelocks, 184 packages of lint, 122 tin cups, 
plates, and spoons, 51 needle-books, 62 hair-brushes, 594 
combs, 523 packages of corn starch, cocoa, sago, and tapioca, 
897 bottles of wine and cider, 343 jars of jellies, fruits, con- 
densed milk, and pickles, 175 bottles of pepper, mustard, and 
ginger, 5 bags of meal, 5 ounces of quinine, 3 bis. of onions, 
30 bis. of apples, 1 bl. of brown bread; besides crackers, 
prunes, lemons, oranges, rice, oatmeal, olives, tea, coffee, 
sponges, soap, tobacco, salve, sweet oil, sugar, dried fruits, 
groats, confectionery. 

These are not all the items, but they serve to show the infin- 
ite variety of articles which our patriotic women contributed 
towards the comfort of our soldiers. Connected with the Sol- 
diers' Relief Association was a Knitting Society, which held 
weekly meetings and did much useful work. 

Want of space alone prevents us from giving a complete list 
of the officers of the association during the period of its exist- 
ence. We cannot refrain, however, from quoting a paragraph 
from a letter which we received from a gentleman (not of 
Haverhill) whom we well know and respect, in regard to Mrs. 
E. P. Hill, whose devotion to the interests and comfort of our 
soldiers has made her name precious to them : — 

" In your * History of Massachusetts in the Rebellion,' I trust you 
will give my friend, Mrs. E. P. Hill, of Haverhill, what is her due. 
She worked all through the war for us ' boys,' and lost her heahh in 
caring for us. It was Mrs. Hill who brought me home from hospital, 
and cared for me tenderly — I might say she saved my life — after I 
was confiued in Libby Prison." 

The whole receipts of the association in money was $11- 
457.13, of which $4,700.00 was distributed between the differ- 
ent Commissions. 

Ipswich. — Incorporated Aug. 5, 1634. Population in 1800, 
3,300; in 1865, 3,311. Valuation in 1860, $1,276,245; in 
1865, $1,566,491. 



IPSWICH. 203 

The selectmen in 1861 were Joseph Ross, Ira Worcester, 
BichanI T. Dodge ; in 1862, Aaron Cogswell, Frederick Will- 
comb, Joseph Cogswell ; in 1863, Frederick T. Dodge, Fred- 
erick Willcomb, Eandal Andrews ; in 1864, Joseph Ross, 
Richard T. Dodge, Frederick Willcomb ; in 1865, John D. 
Cross, Thomas H. Lord, Joseph Farley. 

The town-clerk in the years 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, 
was Alfred Kimball; * in 1865, Wesley K. Bell. The town- 
treasurer during all the years of the war was Jeremiah Lord. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 8th of July, at which it 
was voted to appropriate three thousand dollars for the payment 
of State aid to the families of volunteers. 

1862. ' A special meeting was held on the 13th of January, 
when two thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment 
of State aid. At a meeting held on the 17th of March, the 
treasurer was authorized to borrow '* whatever amount of money 
might be necessary for the payment of State aid." On the 22d 
of July the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars 
to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and be credited 
to the quota of the town. Another meeting was held on the 
4th of August, when the town voted to increase the bounty 
to two hundred dollars. On the 25th of August the bounty to 
each volunteer for nine months' service was fixed at one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars. 

1863. At a meeting held on the 2d of November, the town 
voted '* to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volun- 
teer who may enlist and be credited to the quota of the town." 

1864. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year ; 
although recruiting was continued, and also the payment of 
bounties to volunteers and State aid to the families of enlisted 
men. 

1865. A town-meeting was held on the 15th of March, at 
which it was voted to appropriate twenty-five hundred dollars 



♦ Mr. Kimball died in 1864 ; and George R. Lord was appointed to fill the 
rncancy, and serred until the annual town-meeting in 1865. 



204 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

for the payment of bounties to volunteers, and six hundred and 
thirty-five dollars " to reimburse individuals who had advanced 
money to pay volunteers." 

Ipswich, according to the return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished 'three hundred and seventy-five men for the 
war, which is probably very nigh the exact number, as the town 
furnished its full quota upon every call made by the President, 
and at the end of the war had a surplus of thirty-three over 
and above all demands. Fifteen were commissioned officers. 
The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirteen 
thousand and two hundred dollars ($13,200.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the years of the war for the payment of State aid to the 
families of volunteers, and which was refunded by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,366.22; in 1862, 
$9,171.59; in 1863, $11,990.85; in 1864, $10,462.94; in 
1865, $5,500.00. Total amount, $39,491.60. 

The ladies of Ipswich formed a large and active association 
at the beginning of the war to do soldiers' work, which was 
continued until the close. They forwarded a great amount of 
stores to the hospitals for the sick and wounded, chiefly through 
the Sanitary and Christian Commissions. The leading man- 
agers of the association were Mi-s. Lucre tia Perkins and Mrs. 
Robert Southgate, both of whom have died since the termi- 
nation of the war. 

Lawrence. — Incorporated as a town April 17, 1847; 
incorporated as a city March 29, 1853. Population in 1860, 
17,639; in 1865, 21,733. Valuation in 1860, $10,015,503; 
in 1865, $11,240,191. 

The city officers in 1861 were as follows : James K. Barker, 
mayor; Morris Knowles, Hezekiah Plummer, Artemas VV. 
Stearns, William Thomas, Archibald McFarlin, Menzies C. 
Andrews, aldermen. In 1862, William H. J. Wright, mayor; 
John C. Hoadley, William R. Spalding, Samuel M. Stedinan, 
Thomas S. Stratton, Luther Ladd, Menzies C. Andrews, alder- 
men. In 1863, William H. J. Wright, mayor ; James Byrom, 



LAWRENCE. 205 

James A. Treat, Joshua Pilsbury, Jr., Albert Emerson, Samuel 
B. Kimball, John Q. A. Burridge, aldermen. In 1864, Alfred 
J. French, mayor ; Morris Knowles, Milton Bonney, James 
Payne, William Thomas, Alfred Lang, John Q. A. Burridge, 
aldermen. In 1865, Milton Bonney, mayor; William A. 
Bussell, Joseph Norris, James Payne, William Thomas, Alfred 
Lang, John Q. A. Burridge, aldermen. 

The city-clerk during all these years was George R. Rowe. 
The city-treasurer during the years 1861, 1862, and 1863, was 
Nathaniel Wilson; during 1864 and 1865, Robert H. Tewks- 
bury. 

1861. The first meeting of the city council, to act upon 
matters connected with the war, was a special meeting held 
April 16th, at which the following preamble and resolutions 
were adopted : — 

Whereas the President of the United States, in view of the danger- 
ous RebellioD now existing in several of the Federal States, threatening 
alike the security and liberty of our homes, has seen fit to make a 
requisition upon the Governor of this Commonwealth for a certain 
number of troops to assist in quelliDg said Rebellion ; and as the two 
millitary companies of Lawrence comprise a portion of the Sixth 
Regiment of militia who, in obedience to said requisition, are now on 
their way to report themselves at headquarters ; therefore be it — 

Resolved^ By the city of Lawrence, that the sum of five thousand 
dollars be, and hereby is, appropriated, to be used in cttse of need, to 
provide for the wants of those who comprise these companies, or their 
families. 

May 16th, Five thousand dollars additional were appropri- 
ated for the same purpose, and in October following another 
appropriation of three thousand dollars was made. 

On the 18th of April a petition of Daniel Saunders, Jr., and 
others, was presented to the city council, asking an appropria- 
tion for the purpose of equipping a regiment of volunteer militia ; 
and five thousand dollars were appropriated for that purpose. 
At the same meeting the mayor was requested to cause the 
national flag to be raised upon the flagstaff on Lawrence Com- 
mon, ''there to remain as a permanent evidence of our devotion 
to our country." April 24th, Fifteen hundred dollars were 



206 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

appropriated " for the purchase of flannels and other materials 
asked for by the Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Society of Lawrence," 
to be made into articles for the use of the volunteers. 

On the receipt of the news of the death of Sumner Henry 
Needham, who fell in Baltimore on the memorable 19th of 
April, and whose name has become historical as one of the first 
martyrs of the Kebellion, the following resolutions were passed 
by both branches of the city government : — 

Resolved^ That to the afflicted relatives and friends of the dear de- 
parted, in this hour of their deep heart grief, we extend our tenderest 
sympathies ; and, while we would not invade the sanctity of their sor- 
row, his loss to us, as a community, a people, and a nation, and the 
remembrance of the noble patriotism and holy devotion inspiring the 
mission in which he has fallen, throws upon our hearts the same cloud 
of sadness, and unites our grief to theirs. 

Resolved^ That in respect to the memory of the deceased this city 
government will attend the funeral in a body ; that we invite our fellow- 
citizens generally to join in paying a last tribute of respect to the 
departed, and we recommend the closing of all places of business in 
our city on the occasion of his interment.* 

The city of Lawrence continued its activity in behalf of the 
great cause until the end of the war, making liberal appropria- 
tions of money to encourage recruiting, and for the payment of 
State aid to the families of volunteers, for which a special agent 
of the city was placed in charge. Each company belonging 
to the city, on its return from the front at the close of its term 
of service, was received " with fitting welcome and suitable 
demonstrations." 

Lawrence furnished two thousand four hundred and ninety- 
seven men for the war, which was a surplus of two hundred 
and twenty-four over and above all demands. Ninety-two were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the city on account of the war, exclusive 

♦ Mr. Tewksbury, the city-treasurer, writes : *' In aceonlance with the resolves, 
the city government attended the funeral in a body, with distinguished State 
officials, and a counUess throng of citizens. He was buried from the city hall, 
aU business being suspended for the time, and the flags displayed at half mast, 
with general evidence of mourning on every hand. A suitable granite monu- 
ment in the Lawrence cemetery marks the last resting-place of the martyr." 



LYNN. 207 

of State aid, was one hundred and fifteen thousand six hundred 
and thirty dollars and ten cents ($115,630.10). 

The amount of money raised by the city during the four years 
of the war for State aid paid to the families of volunteers, and 
which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows : In 1861, $14,524.05 ; in 1862, $52,555.52 ; in 1863, 
$58,153.48; in 1864, $45,000.00; in 1865, $22,000.00. 
Total amount, $192,233.05. 

The " Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Society " of Lawrence continued 
their patriotic work during the continuance of the war. They 
held weekly meetings in the common council room in the city 
hall, to make under-clothing, bandages, lint, and other articles, 
for the sick and wounded in the hospitals. They also contributed 
upwards of seven thousand dollars in cash, in various practical 
charities to the soldiers. 

Lynn. — Incorporated as a town November, 1637 ; as a city, 
April 10, 1850. Population in 1860, 19,083 ; in 1865, 20,- 
800. Valuation in 1860, $9,299,128 ; in 1865, $10,053,309. 

In 1861, Hiram N. Breed, mayor; Archilaus C Wyman, 
Alvan F. Kent, Edward Pease, Eichard H. Carter, Benjamin 
A. Ward, Nathan Clark, Nathaniel S. Doe, Moses D. Merrill, 
Jesse L. Lewis, aldermen. In 1862, Peter M. Neal, mayor ; 
John W. Blaney, Baxter Gregory, Jacob M. Lewis, Ezra W. 
Mudge, William N. Melcher, Joshua Patch, Benjamin Sprague, 
Edwin Walden, aldermen. In 1863, Peter M. Neal, mayor; 
John W. Blaney, Joshua Patch, Baxter Gregory, Jacob M. 
Lewis, Ezra W. Mudge, Benjamin Sprague, John L. Shorey, 
Edwin Walden, aldermen. In 1864, Peter M. Neal, mayor; 
John W. Blaney, Baxter Gregory, Jacob M. Lewis, Ezra W. 
Mudge, Joshua Patch, Benjamin Sprague, John L. Shorey, 
Edwin Walden, aldermen. In 1865, Peter M. Neal, mayor; 
Walter B. Allen, Amos F. Breed, Jacob M. Lewis, William 
M. Newhall, Edwin Patch, Clarkson Paul, Thomas Stacy, 
Phillip P. Tapley, aldermen. 

The city-clerk during all of the years of the war was Benja- 
min H. Jones. The city-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 
1864, was William Bassett; in 1865, Elbridge Lovejoy. 



08 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1861. April 20th, Ten thousand dollars were appropriated 
for the support of the families of those soldiers who had been 
ordered into service.* A committee was appointed under whose 
direction the money was to be expended. The treasurer was 
authorized to borrow the money. The captain of each com- 
pany was informed of the appropriation, and requested to 
communicate the fact to his men. The Committee on Public 
Property was directed to cause the American flag to be dis- 
played from the city hall. July 13th, The State aid to families 
of soldiers was directed to be paid as provided by law. A 
committee was appointed to make arrangements for a public 
reception of the two Lynn companies on their return from their 
three months* service, who reported on the 17th in favor of the 
reception. Five hundred dollars were appropriated for that pur- 
pose, and a committee appointed to make proper arrangements. 
October 16th, Eight thousand dollars were appropriated for 
aid to soldiers' families, and on December 12th five thousand 
additional for the same purpose. 

1862. January 8th, Ten thousand dollars, and on March 
5th twenty-five thousand dollars, were appropriated for aid to 
soldiers' families. A special meeting was held March 7th, at 
which resolutions were reported by a committee and unani- 
mously adopted, a portion of which are as follows : — 

Whereas the city couDcil of Lynn has heard with profound grief 
the intelligence of the death of Brigadier- General Frederick W. 
Lander, which sad event occurred at Paw Paw, in the State of Vir- 
ginia, on Sunday last ; therefore — 

Resolved^ That by the death of General Lander the Union has lost 
one of its most gallant defenders ; Massachusetts, a representative of 
heroism and chivalric bravery worthy of her proud history ; our sister 
city of Salem, a son whose reputation she will cherish as a bright 
example in her annals ; and the city of Lynn, a citizen whose short 
residence within her borders has given her a special share in the 
honors which now surround his memory. 

Resolved^ That, on behalf of the people of Lynn, we tender his widow 



♦ Two companies, — the Lynn Light Infantry and the Lynn City Guards. — 
belonging to the Eighth Regiment, MassachuBetts Volmitcer Militia, had left for 
Washington on the 17thy only three days before the appropriation was made. 



LYNN. 209 

and his afflicted relatives our warmest sympathy in this hour of their 
bitter bereavement; that these resolutions be entered upon the city 
records, and a copy sent to the family of the deceased. 

July 15th, The bounty to each volunteer for three years' ser- 
vice was fixed at one hundred dollars, and twenty thousand dol- 
lars were appropriated to pay that amount to two hundred and 
fifty men to fill the quota of the city. August 18th, Five hun- 
dred dollars were voted in aid of preparing the soldiers' lot in 
"Pine-Grove Cemetery," for the burial of soldiers of Lynn 
who might die in the war. August 27th, Voted, to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine 
months' service, when credited to the quota of the city. 
Twenty thousand dollars were appropriated for that purpose. 
September 2l8t, The mayor of the city was requested to visit 
Washington and vicinity, and give such aid and assistance to 
the sick and wounded of Lynn, whom he may find, as they 
might require. September 30th, Resolutions of respect and 
condolence were adopted in regard to the memory of Captain 
George W. Batchelder of the Nineteenth Regiment Massachu- 
setts Volunteers, who was killed in action at Antietam, Sep- 
tember 16th, and of Lieutenant Charles J. Batchelder of the 
First Massachusetts Cavalry Volunteers, who died at New 
Orleans.* October 15th, Similar resolutions were passed in 
regard to Sergeant Solomon Martin and private John C. Dow, 
who were killed at Antietam. 

1863. January 28th, Forty thousand dollars were appro- 
priated for State aid to soldiers' families. June 17th, Five 
hundred dollars were voted to give a suitable reception to the 
Lynn companies, "D," "I," and "F," of the Eighth Regiment, 
on their return from nine months' service. August 19th, 
Thirty-five thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to 
soldiers' families. 

1864. January 18th, Sixty thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated for State aid to soldiers' families. June 20th, Voted, to 
pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty dollars to each volun- 

* These young gentlemen were brothers, and the only sons of Jacob Batchel- 
der, Esq., of Lynn. They had both served in the Eighth Massachusetts Regi- 
ment for three months' service. 

14 



M 



210 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

teer who may enlist in either the military or naval service^ when 
mustered in and credited to the quota of the city. Ten thou- 
sand dollars were appropriated to pay the same. October 25th, 
A special committee was appointed to make preparations for 
the reception and entertainment of the veteran soldiers of the 
three years' service, and of Companies D and F "of the one 
hundred days' service," belonging to Lynn, on their return from 
the war. 

1865. February. 27th, In honor of the Union victories " at 
Savannah, Charleston, Wilmington, and other places," the city 
marshal was directed to cause the church-bells of the city to be 
rung for one hour at sunrise, noon, and sunset, and a salute of 
one hundred guns to be fired at noon on the 4th of March ; and 
the citizens were invited to display " the American ensign from 
their dwellings and places of business." April 11th, A vote 
was passed " as a testimonial of respect to the late Lieutenant 
Thomas B. Hart, of Lynn. Eight hundred and fifty dollars 
were appropriated to defray the expenses incurred by the city 
in celebrating the recent glorious successes of the Union forces 
in Virginia." On the 15th the two branches of the city govern- 
ment met in convention, when the mayor announced in fitting 
words the death of President Lincoln. A prayer was made 
by Rev. Mr. Biddle, after which a series of appropriate reso- 
lutions were reported by a committee and unanimously adopted. 
June 26th, One thousand dollars were tappropriated " for the 
purpose of receiving our returned soldiers upon the approach- 
ing 4th of July." 

Lynn, according to the return made by the city authorities in 
1866, furnished three thousand two hundred and seventy-five 
men for the war, which we believe to be more than the actual 
number credited, as at the end of the war the surplus was 
exactly two hundred and thirty over and above all demands. 
One hundred and three were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by Lynn on ac- 
count of the war, exclusive of State aid to soldiers' families, 
was one hundred and sixty-two thousand one hundred and 
seven dollars and ten cents ($162,107.10). This does not 
include a "citizens' fund" raised by private subscription for 



LYNN. 211 

xecruiting purposes, which amounted to twenty-three thousand 
4lollai*8 ; to which was subsequently added by the same means 
three tliousand dollars, the greater part of which was expended 
for sanitary purposes, and aid to soldiers and their families, 
independent of the city. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the city for 
State aid to the families of soldiers during the four years of 
the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed to it by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $15,060.05; in 1862, 
$53,852.13; in 1863, $61,788.11; in 1864, $60,000.00 ; in 
1865, $40,000.00. Total amount, $230,700.29. 

The ladies of Lynn did their full share of soldiers' work dur- 
ing the war. In the years 1861 and 1862 they obtained from 
the different religious societies, individual subscriptions, chil- 
dren's fairs, and other sources, and sent to the army and hospi- 
tals in aid of the sick and wounded, in cash and comfortable 
clothing, about three thousand dollars, independent of what 
was termed "sanitary aid." During each year of the war, and 
especially at Thanksgiving and Christmas, large quantities of 
provisions, hospital stores, cordials, &c., were sent forward to 
different camps and hospitals in and around Washington and 
elsewhere, the money value of which it is impossible now to 
compute. In February, 1863, the Ladies' Sanitary Aid Society 
was formed, with Mrs. W. C. Richards president, Miss M. L. 
Newhall secretary, and Miss A. E. Ladd treasurer. This 
society had five hundred and eighty members, more than one 
hundred of whom were active workers until the close of the 
war. The receipts in cash the first year were $2,292.02 ; and 
their total cash receipts were $3,778.81, all of which was 
properly expended for the benefit of the soldiers and their fami- 
lies. The amount of work done by the society in making 
under-clothing, bandages, lint, preserves, and delicacies for the 
sick and wounded, we cannot accurately state or even estimate ; 
but we know it was very great. 

The Society of Friends (whose principles in regard to war 
forbid their contributing to recruit the army) contributed in 
cash fifteen hundred dollars ; and the ladies of the society in 
cash, garments, and sanitary stores, five hundred dollars. 



\ 



212 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

making a total of two thousand dollars. The above does not 
include what was done in aid of the freedmen. 

Lynnfield. — Incorporated July 3, 1782. Population in 
1860, 866; in 1865, 725. Valuation in 1860, $558,854; 
in 1865, $604,617. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were 
John Danforth, Jr., Andrew Mansfield, William Skinner. 

The town-clerk during those years was John Danforth, Jr. 
The town-treasurer during the same period was Jonatlian 
Bryant. 

1861. The first town-meeting, to act upon matters relating 
to the war, was held on the 6th of Mgy, at which a sum not 
to exceed two thousand dollars was appropriated " for the use of 
soldiers who may enlist, and in aid of their families living in 
the town." 

1862. On the 28th of July the town voted to pay a bounty 
of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer who enlists 
for three years, and is credited to the quota of the town. A 
series of patriotic resolutions were read by Rev. Allen Gannett, 
setting forth, — first, That the Rebellion "must be met by the 
sharpest practice of the sword ; " second. That the Union must 
be preserved " at whatever cost ; " third, " That the young men 
of Lynnfield are expected to do their part in the great work ; " 
and fourth, " That while we regard it as the first duty of this 
nation to use all its energies to strike this infernal Rebellion 
dead, and cannot reasonably expect success until it does, our 
trust is in the Living God by whose power and purpose nations 
stand or fall." The resolutions were adopted. On the 25th of 
August the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars 
to each volunteer for nine months' service who is credited to the 
town. 

1863. March 2d, Voted, " that one hundred dollars be paid 
to each of the volunteers from Lynnfield to whom no bounty 
has been previously paid ; " also, to give the widows of the 
soldiers a gratuity of fifty dollars each. 

Lynnfield furnished seventy-six men for the war, which was 
a surplus of three over and above all demands. Four were 



MANCHESTER. 213 

comnaissioned officers. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was seven thousand nine hundred and 
eighty-six dollars ($7,986.00) . Of this amount upwards of nine 
hundred dollars were voluntarily contributed by individuals. 

The amount of money raised and expended during the war 
for State aid to soldiers* families, and afterwards repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $279.86; in 1862, 
$1,073.80; in 1863, $1,459.00; in 1864, $2,157.00; in 1865, 
$1,200.00. Total amount, $6,869.66. 

Manchester. — Incorporated May 14, 1645. Population 
in 1860, 1,698; in 1865, 1,643. Valuation in 1860, $787,- 
045 ; in 1865, $766,383. 

The selectmen in 1861 were John Lee, John Price, Aaron 
Bennett ; in 1862, John Price, Aaron Bennett, Albert E. Low ; 
in 1863, John Price, Aaron Bennett, George F. Allen ; in 

1864, George F. Allen, Aaron Bennett, George F. Rust; in 

1865, George F. Allen, Aaron Bennett, Albion Gilman. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was John Lee ; in 1862, 1863, 1864, 
and 1865, George F. Allen. The town-treasurer during all 
these years was Albert E. Low. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon questions 
relating to the war, was held on the Ist of May, at which 
Albert W. Jewett, Albert E. Low, and Samuel Crowell were 
appointed to ascertain the wants of the families of soldiers who 
have enlisted or may enlist in the service of their country, and 
to make proper provision for them ; and for that purpose fifteen 
hundred dollars were appropriated, which the treasurer was 
authorized to borrow. 

1862. January 10th, One thousand dollars were authorized to 
be borrowed for aid to soldiers' families, March 17th, Three 
thousand dollars additional were voted for aid to the soldiers' 
families during the year. July 15th, Voted, to pay a bounty 
of one hundred and fifty dollars to each inhabitant who shall 
volunteer for three years' service, when mustered in and credited 
to the quota of the town. The treasurer was authorized to bor- 
row the money to pay the same. August 22d, A bounty of one 



__i 



214 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to each volunteer for 
nine months* service, when mustered in and credited to the 
town. Voted, that Captain Russell Sturgis, Jr., be authorized 
by the selectmen " to hang out his flag and put up his posters, 
for the purpose of enlisting volunteers for his company in the 
Forty-fifth Regiment." The quota (twenty-five) were enlisted 
in a very short time. 

1863. January 12th, The selectmen were directed to pay 
aid to the widows and children of deceased soldiers, until they 
shall have received a pension. March 9th, Six thousand dol- 
lars were appropriated to pay State aid to soldiers' families 
during the year. 

1864. July 28th, The town voted to pay a bounty of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three, 
two, or one year's service under the recent call of the President 
for men ; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money for 
the purpose. He was also directed to deposit money with the 
State treasurer to pay bounties for volunteers which the State 
might furnish to the credit of the town. Recruiting was thus 
continued during the year, and the same amount of bounty was 
paid to volunteers until the end of the war. 

Manchester furnished one hundred and eighty-three men for 
the war, which was a surplus of eight over and above all de- 
mands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was nine thousand four hundred 
and twenty-seven dollars ($9,427.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the 
four years of the war, and which was subsequently refunded by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $1,121.64; in 
1862, $4,516.99; in 1863, $5,209.00; in 1864, $3,995.30 ; 
in 1865, $2,278.37. Total amount, $17,121.30. 

The ladies of Manchester, in the early part of the war, 
formed a society called " A Band of Work," the purpose of 
which was to work for the soldiers. They continued their 
patriotic and Christian labors until the end of the war, during 
which they sent forward at various times under-clothing, stock- 



MARBLEHEAD. 215 

ingSy dried frtiits, and many other useful articles for the sick 
and wounded. 

Marblehead. — Incorporated May 2, 1649. Population 
in 1860, 7,646 ; in 1865, 7,330. Valuation in 1860, $2,367,- 
952; in 1865, $2,131,268. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William Nutting, Jr., James 
H. Gregory, Richard Bessom, Jr., Samuel Bowden, Jonathan 
H. Ome; in 1862, William Nutting, Jr., Jonathan H. Ome, 
Joseph H. Robinson, Henry A. Potter, Stephen Hathaway, Jr. ; 
in 1863, William Nutting Jr., Jonathan H. Orne, Stephen 
T. Prime, Henry A. Potter, Stephen Hathaway, Jr. ; in 1864, 
William Nutting, Jr., Stephen T. Prime, Simon Lamprell, 
Stephen Hathaway, Jr., Henry A. Potter; in 1865, William 
Nutting, Jr., Stephen T. Prime, Richard L. Woodfin, Benja- 
min Wormstead, Samuel S. Trefry. 

The town-clerk through all these years was Glover Broughton. 
The town-treasurer since 1852, and all through the war, was 
W. B. Brown. 

1861. Marblehead had three companies in the Eighth Regi- 
ment Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, when the war began ; and 
they were the first to reach Boston (April 17th) in the war, on 
the first call of the President for militia to defend the capital. A 
town-meeting was held April 20th, at which tlie treasurer was 
authorized to borrow five thousand dollars for the relief of the 
families of the soldiers ^ who have gone, or are going, to fight 
the battles of their country." June 17th, Voted, to borrow ten 
thousand dollars to be applied by the selectmen, in accordance 
with an act of the Legislature approved May 23d, in aid of the 
families of volunteers. On account of the liberal donation by G. 
Howland Shaw of Boston, the selectmen had not been obliged 
to borrow any part of the five thousand dollars voted at the 
previous meeting. December 2l8t, The treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow three thousand dollars, in addition to what had 
already been voted for aid to the families of volunteers. 

1862. July 19th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years, 
enlisting to the credit of the town ; and Captains Richard Phillips^ 



.£k 



216 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Samuel C. Graves, and Francis Boardman and Samuel Roads 
and John Goodwin, were chosen a committee to aid the select- 
men in recruitincr. The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money for the purpose. The basement stoiy of the town hall 
was ordered to be fitted up for a recruiting place. July Slst, 
The treasurer was authorized to borrow whatever money may 
be required by the selectmen for recruiting purposes, " the rate 
of interest not to exceed six per cent." August 26th, Voted, to 
pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to volunteers for nine 
months' service, until the quota of the town be filled ; and if 
the three companies in the town shall enlist and be accepted, 
and the aggregate shall be greater than the number of men 
called for from the town, " then the bounties shall be paid to 
each company in proportion to its numbers, but the aggregate 
of such bounties shall not exceed the total number of the quota 
multiplied by one hundred." On motion of Jonathan H. Orne, 
"Voted, that the meeting request all shoe-manufacturers, all 
store- keepers, and all others, to close their places of business, 
each day during the remainder of the week, from two o'clock 
P.M. to six o'clock P.M. ; and all citizens abstain from customary 
labor during those hours and assist the authorized agents in pro- 
curing recruits." Also, that the bells be rung each day from 
two o'clock to three o'clock p.m. during the week. The Marble- 
head Band was invited to be present in the town hall and give 
their services during the hour in which the bells were to be 
rung. September 27th, A meeting was held, at which further 
measures were adopted to raise money, and arrange with the 
city of Boston for the transfer of volunteers, Marblehead having 
more than filled its quota. 

1863. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money for aid to soldiers' families. August 8th, The selectmen 
were directed to confer with the Governor and Council, and see 
if the State will assume the additional expense incurred by the 
town in the repairs of Fort Sewall, and report as soon as pos- 
sible.* August 15th, The committee reported they had ad- 

* Fort Sewall was in ruins when the Rebellion broke out, and therefore 
afforded no protection to the town or the harbor from rebel war- vessels. It was 
soon made stronger than ever, and was garrisoned until the end of the war. 



MARBLEHEAD. 217 

dressed a letter to Governor Andrew to show that the Federal 
Govemraent only allowed laborers at work on fortifications one 
dollar and twenty-five cents a day, and they could not be ob- 
tained now at that price. They also enclosed a copy of the 
vote of the town, under which they were authorized to act. 
The Legislature had passed a law in regard to erecting forts or 
earth-works for coast defence. The town had estimated that 
three thousand dollars would be required to add fifty cents a 
day to the laborers' pay to complete it : they therefore desired to 
know, if the town should expend that sum, it would be in ac- 
cordance with the act of the Legislature ; and if not, whether any 
assurance could be given that it would be refunded under a 
special act of the Legislature. Fort Sewall, the selectmen 
represented, was a protection to the harbors of Salem and 
Beverly as well as Marblehead, and therefore Marblehead should 
not expend all the money and run all the risk. The authorities 
of Marblehead had an interview with Governor Andrew ; and 
the matter was finally arranged, so far as it could be at that 
time, that if the town would by its local action appropriate a 
suflScient sum to pay fifty cents a day to the laborers at work on 
the fort, which payments were to be satisfactory to the Governor 
and Council, and properly audited, the money thus advanced 
would be repaid to the town when the Legislature next met. 
Under this arrangement Fort Sewall was built, armed, and gar-, 
risoned. 

Marblehead furnished for the army and navy one thousand 
and forty-eight men, which was a surplus of ninety-one over and 
above all demands. Eight hundred and twenty-seven were in 
the military service, of whom thirteen were commissioned ofl5- 
cers ; and two hundred and twenty-one officers and men were 
in the naval service. In the military service, one hundred and 
two died of wounds and sickness, and eighty-one were wounded 
and recovered. In the naval service, eight died and six were 
wounded. The whole amount of money raised for war pur- 
poses by the town, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred and 
thirty-nine thousand seven hundred and twenty-five dollars 
($139,725.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended in payment of 



216 



MABSACnUSETTS IK THE REll! 



Samuel C. Grsivcs, and Francis Buartlm:) 
and John Goodwin, were clioaen a comniii 
lucn in recruiting. Tlie selectmen weic 
money for tlie purpose. The basement ^ 
was ordered to be fitted up for a recrnii; 
Tlie treasurer was authorized to borrow 
be required by the selectmen for recruiti' 
of interest not to exceed six per ecnt." 
pay a bounty of one hundred dollar- 
months' service, until the quota of tb' 
the three companies in the town shsi' 
and the aggregate shall be greater 
called for from the town, " then the 
each company in proportion to its nii 
of such bounties shall not exceed tht' 
multiplied by one hundred." On ni 
" Voted , that the meeting request 
store- keepers, and all others, to el 
each day during the remainder ol 
p.u. to six o'clock P.M. ; and all i 
labor during those hours and assh 
curing recruits." Also, that the 
two oVlock to three o'clock P.M. i! 
head Band was invited to be prr- 
their services during the hour 
rung. September 27th, A in* 
measures were adopted to rat 
city of IJoston for the transfer 
mure than filled its quota. 

ISf!."!. March 3d, The if 
money for aid to soldiers' fim 
were directed to confer wiili 
if the State will assume th- " 
town in the repairs of Foii 
siblc.* August 15th, Tl. 

* Kurt Sewall wbi in ruins 
offonliHl no protection to tlie tavi 
goon made itroDgcr thftn ctot, Ki- 




•.;.;)i'0; 

V. Abbott, 

■ and 18ft4, 

J \V. Gage; 

^<:, Samuel G. 

M the yean of the 

act upon matten 
f April, at which it 
il.iUui " for arming, 
^ a flommittee, com- 
:. p. Hint, John C. 
uiri'to i^Bburse the 
^■M ef Methuen who 
k^lril hereafter vulim- 
^tht u discharged a 
^— aaitt recdved by 
>^«id llutt "the sum of 
Ac Mwn who shall be- 
iiwirinr in Methuen, 
■■■i into the United- 
f pff." August 26th, 
( fohmtwrs aa provided 

H^Uv of one hundred 

■a the niilitaiy service, 

f doota of the town. 

at the forty-seven 

'two hundred 



219 

'.'* jukI "to discontinue 

..n' j'tli of the present 

. :\ hountv of one Inin- 

;■ lor nine months' service, 

;<• town. 

= fill the quota of the town 

;;iti:(l Oct. 17, IHO.S; and to 

1)0 drafted the same State aid 

iimteers. 

::v t«; volunteers for three vears' 

■»! and twentv-five dollars, to he 

1' n mustered in and credited to the 

- K. Goss and Eben Sawvcr were 

:.«n in the recruiting of men and the 

\ sL-ries of resolutions were read and 

. i)f which we copy the following : — 

of events, although long spaied, many of 

11' I townsmen have been strirken down upon 

■il" whom have fallen to rise no more in this life, 

iillV-ring from terrible wounds, from tin* elfects 

MM recover, except by the smiles of IVovidenoe 

ir»- of friends; therefore — 

•■, the citizens of Methuen, in town-moclinjj; Mssem- 

• Icsire to declare and express our grief for the lost 

. :ind our interest in, and sympathy for, tlie wounded 

"••'. That wo regret exceedingly to learn that not less 

oitl perhaps more, of our men have been laid low in 

• i-s upon the altar of our country. 

i liat we hereby extend our tenderest sympathifs to their 

■Viends ; that we will mourn with those that mourn and 

■ hem that weep ; that we pledge ourselves to watch over, 

i'' for, and assist their widows and orphans. 

'/. That we are extremely anxious for those of our soldiers 

now confined in the hospitals or camps, nccissarily iti a 

• i situation during this warm weather, suftVring from the efli*cts 

Mils and sickness, and whatever we possess shall be freely given 

eir comfort and support; that some person who may be a])p<)inted 

.1^ .selectmen be sent fortiiwith to visit our wounded as an a«;ent 

iiiis town; and that said agent be instructed to see to it that those 

k :ind wounded ones want for nothing which may be in his power to 

'. e, and we pledge ourselves as citizens to pay the bills. 



218 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

State aid to the families of men in the military and naval service 
during the four years of the war, and afterwards refunded by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $7,368.75 ; in 
1862,123,332.19; in 1863, $32,099.71 ; in 1864, $28,000.00; 
in 1865, $17,000.00. Total amount, $107,800.65. 

Methuen. — Incorporated Dec. 8, 1725. Population in 
1860, 2,566 ; in 1865, 2,575. Valuation in 1860, $1,283,920 ; 
in 1865, $1,292,951. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Charles F. Abbott, 
Daniel T. Morrison, John W. Frederick; in 1863 and 1864, 
John W. Frederick, Daniel T. Morrison, George W. Gage ; 
in 1865, Daniel T. Morrison, George W. Gage, Samuel G. 
Sargent. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the 
war was Charles Shed. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 30th of April, at which it 
was voted to appropriate five thousand dollars '' for arming, 
equipping, and furnishing volunteers ; ** and a committee, com- 
prising the selectmen, Eben Sawyer, I. P. Flint, John C. 
Webster, and Daniel Currier, was appointed '* to disburse the 
money." It was also voted that each citizen of Methuen who 
has entered the military service, or who shall hereafter volun- 
teer, be '* paid from the time he enlists until he is discharged a 
sum of money sufficient to make the whole amount received by 
him equal to twenty-six dollars a month ; " and that " the sum of 
fifteen dollars be paid to each citizen of the town who shall be- 
come a member of the volunteer company recruiting in Methuen, 
and hold himself in readiness to be mustered into the United- 
States service, in addition to his monthly pay." August 26th, 
Voted, to pay State aid to the families of volunteers as provided 
by law. 

1862. July 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist in the military service, 
and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. 
August 2d, It was voted to pay to each of the forty-seveir 
volunteers required to fill the quota of the town *two hundre - 



220 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Two other resolutions complete the series : one of which was 
comph'mentary to t\\e First Regiment Heavy Artillery Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers, in which many Methuen men were mem- 
bers ; and the other congratulated those who had bravely, and 
without injury, faced danger in the battle-field. September 
12th, The selectmen were authorized to deposit money with the 
Treasurer of the Commonwealth to obtain twenty-five recruits 
to fill the quota of the town, "or to procure them in any other 
manner at the same rate." 

Methuen furnished three hundred and twenty-five men for the 
war, which was a surplus of fifty- one over and above all demands. 
Fifteen were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-eight thousand six 
hundred and fifty-one dollars and seventy-three cents (138,- 
651.73). In addition to this amount, seven thousand five hun- 
dred dollars were gratuitously given by individual citizens, to aid 
soldiers' families and 'encourage recruiting. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $1,625.42 ; in 
1862, $5,494.79; in 1863, $7,044.26 ; in 1864, $6,392.38 ; 
in 1865, $2,900.00. Total amount, $23,456.85. 

The ladies of Methuen devoted much tijne to soldiers' work, 
though we have been unable to procure a statement of the 
amount performed. Mr. Pierce, chairman of the selectmen for 
the present year, writes : " As to the doings of the ladies, I can 
get no definite information. There were both Christian and 
Sanitary Commission Societies, and a large amount of work 
was done and sent to those departments. There was nearly 
one thousand dollars raised by fairs and levees, in money." 

MiDDLETON. — Incorporated June 20, 1728. Population in 
1860, 940; in 1865, 922. Valuation in 1860, $383,758; in 
1865, $392,465. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William A. Merriam, Benjamin 
P. Richardson, and Asa Howe; in 1862 and 1863, Samuel 



MIDDLETON. 221 

Peabody, Asa Howe, Allen Berry ; in 1864, Samuel Peabody, 
Joseph A. Batchelder, James N. Merriam ; in 1865, James 
N. Merriam, Joseph A. Batchelder, Samuel Peabody. 

The town-clerk during all of these years was Joseph A. 
Batchelder. The town-treasurer during the same period was 
Henry A. Wilkins. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 2d of May, which was 
opened with prayer by Rev. Amos H. Johnson. It was then 
voted to raise one thousand dollars to be expended at the discre- 
tion of the selectmen for the assistance of the soldiers and their 
families belonging to the town ; to be assessed upon tiie polls 
and estates of the town at such time as the selectmen may think 
best. 

1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for 
three years, and be credited to the quota of the town ; to be 
paid when mustered in. The treasurer, under the direction of 
the selectmen, was authorized to borrow the money. James N. 
Merriam, John A. Batchelder, Andrew P. Averill, Famum 
Stiles, and Stephen O. Crane were chosen to assist the select- 
men in recruiting men. August 16th, The same bounty was 
directed to be paid to men who enlist for nine months' service, 
and are credited to the town. 

1863. November 3d, The selectmen were authorized with 
full power to settle the claim of the Commonwealth against the 
town, in regard to payment of bounties, as provided in section 
9th of the act approved April 9, 1863. 

1864. Several meetings were held during this year, at which 
measures were taken to obtain volunteers to fill the quota of the 
town, to raise money to pay bounties, and to refund money to 
individual citizens which they had advanced to encourage re- 
cruiting; and the same general course was pursued until the 
end of the war. 

Middleton furnished one hundred and twenty men for the 
war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all demands. 
None were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 



222 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

exclusive of State aid, was ten thousand two hundred and ten 
dollars ($10,210.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended in payment of 
State aid to the families of volunteers during the four years 
of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $660.62; in 1862, 
$2,319.60; in 1863, $2,408.00; in 1864, $2,569.90; in 
1865, $1,950.00. Total amount, $9,908.12. 

It is estimated that the contributions made by the ladies of 
Middleton for the soldiers averaged about one hundred dollars 
a month, from the beginning to the end of the war. They also 
defrayed the expenses of one of the citizens who served two 
months as an accent of the Christian Commission. 

Nahant. — Incorporated March 29, 1853. Population in 
1860, 380; in 1865, 313. Valuation in 1860, $523,866; in 
1865, $517,194. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Washington H. Johnson, Arte- 
mas Murdock, Walter Johnson ; in 1862, Washington H. 
Johnson, Artemas Murdock, Dexter Stetson ; in 1863, Wash- 
ington H. Johnson, Artemas Murdock, Albert Wyer; in 1864 
and 1865, Washington H. Johnson, Albert Wyer, Edmund B. 
Johnson. 

The town-clerk in 1861, and all through the war, was 
Alfred D. Johnson ; and the town-treasurer was Welcome W. 
Johnson. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate capacity, in regard to matters relating to the 
war during this year. 

1862. March — , Voted, to appropriate three hundred dol- 
lars for aid to soldiers' families, and to pay a bounty of two 
hundred dollars to each volunteer, when mustered in and credited 
to the quota of the town. John E. Lodge and Frederick Tudor 
added to the town bounty of each volunteer the sum of twenty- 
five dollars ; James W. Paige added twenty-five dollars to each 
of the first four recruits, and Nathaniel Walker twenty-five 
dollars to each of the other three. Seven was the number 
required to be raised. The town voted to raise fourteen hun- 



NEWBURY. 223 

dred dollars for recruitiog purposes. August — , Voted, to 
pay a bounty of two hundred dollars to each of the volunteers 
for nine months' service. 

1863. March — , Appropriated three hundred dollars for 
aid to soldiers' families. 

During the years 1864 and 1865 money was appropriated to 
pay aid to soldiers' families and bounties to volunteers. 

Nahant furnished forty-two men for the war, which was a 
surplus of five over and above all demands. One was a com- 
missioned oflScer. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was six thousand five hundred and eight dollars 
($6,508.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the 
four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $32.40; in 

1862, $338.67; in 1863, $506.71; in 1864, $112.00; in 
1865, $48.00. Total amount, $1,037.78. 

During the whole of the war the ladies of Nahant held meet- 
ings to make under-clothing for the soldiers, which, with boxes 
of provisions and small stores, were sent to the Sanitary Com- 
mission. 

Newbury. — Incorporated May 6, 1835. Population in 
1860, 1,444; in 1865, 1,363. Valuation in 1860, $824,524; 
in 1865, $767,849. 

The selectmen during the years 1861 and 1862 were Paul 
Titcomb, Edward H. Little, Eben P. Fergusson ; during 1863 
and 1864, Bartlett J. Currier, Nathaniel Little, Jr., Eben P. 
Fergusson; during 1865, Nathaniel Little, Jr., Joseph N. 
Kolfe, Henry T. Pearson. 

The town-clerk during the entire war was William Little. 
The town-treasurer in 1861 was Joseph N. Rolfe ; in 1862, 

1863, 1864, and 1865, Isaac W. Little. 

1861. A town-meeting was held April 3d, with reference 
to the state of the country, at which the following preamble 
and resolutions were adopted : — 



224 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Whereas, by a systematized course of naisrepresentation, calumny, 
and fraud, a confederate band of traitors have succeeded in plunging a 
portion of our country into open rebellion and civil war, thereby ren- 
dering our government and laws inoperative over a large portion of 
our land, and making the organization and maintenance of a large 
military force an act of absolute necessity ; therefore — 

Resolved, That we pledge the good faith of the town of Newbury for 
the comfortable maintenance of the families of all citizens of Newbury 
who may enter the military service of our country during the present 
war, while in such service. 

Resolved^ That although we may stand upon the verge of civil war. 
that is to drench the soil of our nation for years with the best blood 
of her sons, yet in view of the mighty outburst of enthusiasm, the un- 
paralleled willingness to suffer and die in her cause that now sweeps 
from the Atlantic slopes to the broad prairies of the West, our confi- 
dence in the righteousness of our cause and our faith in the maintenance 
and perpetuity of our glorious heritage of a free constitutional govern- 
ment are all unimpaired. 

Resolved, That our watchword shall be "Liberty and Union, now 
and for ever, one and inseparable," in support of which ** we pledge 
our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor." 

The treasurer was also empowered to borrow three thousand 
dollars to arm and equip all citizens of the town who might 
volunteer, and to aid their families ; in addition to which, three 
hundred dollars were appropriated to place the rifle company of 
the town in condition for immediate service. Following the 
precedents of the Revolutionary times, a committee of vigil- 
ance, correspondence, and safety was chosen, "to take such 
action as might be deemed expedient with reference to such 
persons within the town who might be inimical to the United 
States;" also, on motion of Colonel Daniel Adams, voted, "to 
give three cheers for Lieutenant-General Winfield Scott." The 
meeting then adjourned.* 

1862. A town-meeting was held July 30th, for the purpose 
of filling the quota of the town, at which it was voted to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for 
three years* service. Another meeting was held August 16th, 

* We have given prominence to this remarkable meeting, as we believe it to 
have been the first meeting of the kind held in the United States. 



NEWBURYPORT. 225 

at which it was voted to pay nine-months men a bounty of two 
hundred and fifty dollars. During the remainder of the war 
the town paid the bounty fi^ed by the law of the State ; namely, 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars, in addition to which thirty- 
two hundred and seventy-five dollars were raised by private 
subscription for bounty and recruiting purposes, which was 
afterwards repaid to the subscribers by a vote of the town. 

Newbury furnished one hundred and eighty-nine men for 
the war, being a surplus of twenty-five over and above all 
demands. Five were commissioned oflficers. The amount of 
money voted by the town and expended for war purposes, 
exclusive of State aid, was twenty-eight thousand eight hun- 
dred and sixty-two dollars ($28,862.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the four years of the war, and which was afterwards reim- 
bursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$343.22; in 1862, $1,352.57; in 1863, $2,636.60; in 1864, 
$2,450.00 ; in 1865, $2,200.00. Total amount, $8,982.39. 

The ladies of Newbury formed in the early part of the war a 
Soldiers' Aid Society, which continued in operation as long as 
it was needful. It is estimated that the contributions of the 
society in clothing and sanitary stores amounted in value to 
the sum of two thousand dollars. 

Newburyport. — Incorporated as a town Jan. 28, 1764. 
Population in 1860, 13,401 ; in 1865, 12,980. Valuation in 
1860, $6,847,183; in 1865, $7,659,960. 

In 1861, George W. Jackman, Jr., mayor;* Isaac Hale, 
Jr., Nathaniel Pierce, George S. George, Joseph A. Frothing- 
ham, William H. Huse, George W. Jackman, Jr., Winthrop 
O. Evans, aldermen. In 1862, George W. Jackman, Jr., 
mayor; Isaac Hale, Jr., Charles C. Dame, Nathaniel Pierce, 
George S. George, Horace Hamblet, William H. Huse, Win- 
throp O. Evans, aldermen. In 1863, Isaac H. Boardman, 
mayor; Samuel Pettengell, William Graves, Norman C. 

* Moses Davenport was mayor part of the year, and Mr. Jackman was 

alderman part of the year. 

16 



226 MASSACHUSETTS IX THE BEBELLION. 

t 

Greenough, John N. Pike, William H. Huse, John S. Cumer, 
aldermen. In 1864, George W. Jackman, Jr., mayor; Sam- 
uel Pettengell, Kalph C. Huse, Norman C. Greenough, Enoch 
M. Read, John T. Page, John S. Currier, aldermen. In 
1865, George W. Jackman, Jr., mayor; Paul G. Lunt, Wil- 
liam Pritchard, Warren Currier, William C. Balch, Thomas 
H. Cutter, Moses H. Fowler, aldermen. 

The city-clerk during all the years of the war was Eleazer 
Johnson. The city-treasurer during the same period was 
Daniel Granger. 

1861. Governor Andrew, the day after his first inaugu- 
ration as governor (January 5th), ordered national salutes to 
be fired at different places, on January 8th, in commemoration 
of the battle of New Orleans, and also in honor of Major 
Anderson's recent gallantry in removing hb command from 
Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter in the harbor of Charleston, 
S.C. Newburyport was one of the places where a salute was 
ordered to be fired. On the evening of January 7th the fol- 
lowing resolutions were adopted by the city council of New- 
buryport : — 

Resolved, That while they would consider all the complaints made 
by the State which has voted secession and the other States that con- 
template secession, and while they would urge upon our representatives 
and senators in Greneral Court to repeal the Personal Liberty law, and 
upon our representatives and senators in Congress to prepare or accept 
such just and proper compromises as shall pacify the nation, they ac- 
cept the language of General Jackson, " The Union, it must and 
8UALL liE PRESERVED;" and as Newburyport at all times has been 
loyal and patriotic in support of law, order, and liberty, so she will 
again, if the occasion calls for it, pledge ]ife, fortune, and honor in 
behalf of the Constitution and Union as our fathers left them. 

Resolved^ That this is not a time for faction or party, and we feel 
justified in calling upon all our fellow-citizens to forget their past party 
predilections, and merge in one great Union party; where faction 
shall be forgotten in country, and self in patriotism ; where all shall 
strive for the things that make for peace ; and, while they would pluck 
the mote from their brother's eye, will not forget the beam in their 
own eye. 

Resolvedy That in token of fealty to the Union, our common coun- 



NEWBURYPORT. 227 

try, every part of which, North and South, East and West, is alike 
dear to us, and alike to be defended in their interests and rights, we 
will order the city messenger to hoist upon a flag-staft', to be erected on 
the city hall, and display the national Hag with its thirteen stripes and 
thirty-three stars upon every fair day until further ordered.* 

April 15th, One thousand dollars were appropriated to be 
expended by the mayor in aid of the families of the soldiers 
who had been ordered into active service. May 6tli, A reso- 
lution complimentary to Captain Albert W. Bartlctt " and his 
men who so promptly shouldered their muskets to sustain the 
honor of our flag " was passed ; and fhe mayor was authorized 
to furnish the company with whatever was necessary for their 
comfort. 

1862. Captain Bartlett, while in command of Company 
B, Thirty-fifth Kegiment Massachusetts Volunteers, was killed 
near Maryland Heights, Sept. 17, 1862. The city council, 
which met September 23d, passed a series of resolutions, of 
which we copy the following : — 

Resolved^ That by this sad event the country has lost a true patriot ; 
the city, a useful and enterprising citizen ; our militia, a most zealous, 
brave, and efficient officer ; and the community, one who in all the rela- 
tions of life was a most gentlemanly and honorable man. 

The resolutions were ordered to be entered upon the city 
records and a copy sent to the family of the deceased. 

1863. February 2d, The committee on finance were author- 
ized to borrow twelve hundred dollars as a temporary relief 
fund, and to be applied by the relief committee for that pur- 
pose. April 6th, Resolutions complimentary to Company B, 
Fortieth Kegiment New- York Volunteers, were adopted ; and a 
copy was directed to be sent to Captain Henry II. Foster, ^^ to 
be read by him to the members of said company now in camp 
on the banks of the Rappahannock." f 

* These resolutions we believe to have been the first adopted by any city or 
town in the Commonwealth, or in any loyal State, having relation to the ap- 
proaching reliellion. 

t This company was raised in Newburyport on tlie first call of the President 
for three-years men, May 4, 1861. The Secretary of War declined to receive 



228 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1864. July 5tli, The mayor was requested to call a public 
meeting of citizens, to take mesisures to enlist volunteers in 
anticipation of another call of the President for more men. 

1865. February 20th, The quota of the city being full, the 
mayor, notwithstanding, was directed to continue recruiting 
men for the service, and to pay each volunteer a bounty of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

Newburyport furnished thirteen hundred and sixty-three men 
for the war, which was a surplus of seventy over and above all 
demands.* Fifty-three were commissioned officers. f The 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the city on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred 
and twentv-three thousand ei^jht hundred and seventeen dollars 
and eighty-nine cents ($123,817.89). In addition to this 
amount, six thousand three hundred dollars were voluntarily 
contributed by private citizens. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the city in the 
payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the 
four years of the war, and afterwards reimbursed by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $6,322.45; in 1^62, 
$25,000.00; in 1863, $35,988.25 ; in 1864, $27,000.00 ; in 
1865, $16,000.00. Total amount, $110,310.70. 

Tiie ladies of Newburyport began to do " soldiers' work " early 
in the war, but it was not until August, 1862, that they were 
thoroughly organized into the " Soldiers' lielief Association," 
of which Mrs. John C. March was made president. Their suc- 
cess was complete. At the close of the war they had furnished 
in articles and in money for the sick and wounded to the value 
of thirty thousand dollars. Among the articles furnished were 
3,222 cotton shirts, 1,589 flannel shirts, 2,522 pairs of wool- 
len socks, 781 pairs of drawers, 286 dressing-gowns, 2,700 
bandages, 5,258 handkerchiefs, 3,160 towels, 562 pairs of 

as many regiments as Massachusetts was ready to send. This comimny, and 
four others raised in Massachusetts, went to New York and entered New-York 
regiments, and did good service in the common cause. 

* The men who served in the New- York regiment are not included in this 
enumeration, as they were not counted to the contingent of Massachusetts, but 
to the contingent of New York. 

t Exclusive of the officers in the New- York regiment. 



NORTH ANDOVER. 229 

8Hppei-s,*l,666 "comfort-bags," 1,120 packages of farina and 
maizena, 1,359 boxes of condensed milk, cocoa, and bronia, 
238 pounds of tea and sugar, 2,031 bottles of wine, 287 bottles 
of Cologne water, &c. At the end of the war the society had 
on hand an unexpended balance of upwards of fifteen hundred 
dollars. On the 6th of February, 1865, the city council passed 
the following very appropriate resolution : — 

Resolved^ That the 'thanks of the city council, in behalf of the city, 
be, and are hereby, tendered to the ladies of Newburyport for the many 
blessings which through their patient and protracted exertions have 
gladdened many a heart, and bestowed many comforts to the soldiers 
in the field as well as to those wounded and sick in the several hos- 
pitals. 

In answer to an appeal made by Kev. Dr. Elliot, of St. 
Louis, Mo., a knitting society was formed Oct. 3, 1861 ; and 
in twelve days fifty blankets and two hundred pairs of socks 
were sent by the ladies to the reverend gentlemen for the loyal 
soldiers of the West. 

North Andover. — Incorporated April 7, 1855. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 2,343; in 1865, 2,622. Valuation in 1860, 
$1,575,166; in 1865, $1,830,829. 

The selectmen in 1861 were James C. Carleton, Charles F. 
Johnson, Nathaniel Gage ; in 1862, J. Osgood Loring, Charles 
F. Johnson, Nathaniel Page ; in 1863 and 1864, James C. 
Carleton, Charles F. Johnson, Daniel Carleton ; in 1865, 
Charles F. Johnson, Nathaniel Gage, Benjamin P. Saunders. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, 
was Hiram Berry; in 1864 and 1865, Isaac C. Sargent. 

1861. May 6th, The town voted to appropriate five thou- 
sand dollars to uniform and equip a company of volunteers, and 
to provide aid for their families. The men were to receive fifty 
cents a day while drilling, and ten dollars a month from date of 
muster in until discharged.* George Davis, Moses T. Ste- 
vens, and J. Osgood Loring were cliosen to act with the select- 



* This company was raised, hut for some cause was not accepted ; and the 
men joined other companies then recently in camp. 



230 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

men in the disbursement of the money which the treaSurer was 
authorized to borrow. 

1862. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years within 
twenty days, and be credited to the town. August 25th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred and fifty dollars to each 
volunteer for nine months' service. The treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow the money. 

1863. November 30th, The selectmen were requested to 
call a public meeting " at the earliest evening practicable, at 
Union Hall, and procure gentlemen to address said meeting in 
relation to filling our quota, and to ascertain and report whether 
the town can legally offer pecuniary inducement for persons 
to volunteer their services for suppressing the present Re- 
bellion." . 

1864. March 8th, Voted, "to raise one hundred and twen- 
ty-five dollars for each recruit who shall enlist on or before the 
15th of June next to fill our quota^" June 20th, The select- 
men were requested " to go on and recruit as fast as possible." 
July 5th, Voted, to pay the same bounty to each volunteer 
who shall enlist as a part of the quota of the town prior to 
March 5, 1865, under any call of the President. 

North Andover furnished two hundred and seventy-three men 
for the war, which was a surplus of fifteen over and above all 
demands. None were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was forty thousand 
seven hundred and ninety-five dollars and ten cents ($40,- 
795.10). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the four years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $759.82; in 
1862, $2,975.99; in 1863, $3,981.52; in 1864, $3,219.61; 
in 1865, $2,000.00. Total amount, $12,936.94. 

RocKPORT. — Incorporated Feb. 2'7, 1840. Population in 
1860, 3,237; in 1865, 3,367. Valuation in 1860, $1,320,- 
335 ; in 1865, $1,279,717. 



ROCKPORT. 231 

The selectmen in 1861 were John W. Marshall, William 
Marchant, Addison Gott; in 1862, Joshua Tarr, Austin W. 
Story, William H. Bradley, Jr. ; in 1863, Austin W. Story, 
William H. Bradley, Jr., Henry Dennis, Jr. ; in 1864, Henry 
Dennis, Jr., William Marchant, David Brooks; in 1865, 
Henry Dennis, Jr., William Marchant, William Caldwell. 

The town-clerk during all these years was William Pool. 
The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Henry Clark ; 
in 1864 and 1865, Joseph Manning. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
connected with the war, was held April 30th, at which a i-eport 
was made by a committee who had been chosen at a citizens' 
meeting held April 22d. The report recommended an appro- 
priation of three thousand dollars ; that each volunteer for 
military service should receive twenty dollars when nuistered 
in to the service of the United States ; and the remainder of tlie 
money to be placed in the hands of a committee to be chosen 
by the town, to be used as they might think best. Tlie report 
was accepted. It was also voted " to curtail sucli appropriations, 
either in part or in whole, as were made at the last annual 
meeting, as can consistently be done ;" and a committee of seven 
was appointed to consider which appropriation should be re- 
duced or withheld. In accordance with the recommendation of 
the committee, a reduction was made to the amount of twenty- 
five hundred dollars. 

1862. April 7th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, 
not exceeding five thousand dollars, for aid to soldiers' families. 
July 22d, Voted, to pay to each volunteer for three years' ser- 
vice (to the number of twenty-nine) a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars, when mustered in and credited to the 
quota of the town. August 4th, The bounty to each three- 
years volunteer was increased to two hundred dollars. Calvin 
W. Pool was appointed recruiting agent for the town.* August 
16th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dolhirs to each 



* The quota was soon filled, and the men went into Company F, Tliirty-fifth 
Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, and in less than one montli fought hravely 
at South Mountain and Antietam. 



232 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

volunteer for nine months' service, "when accepted and 
sworn in." 

1863. March 2d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
ten thousand dollars for aid, during the year, to the families 
of volunteers. March 7th, Five hundred dollars were appro- 
priated "to aid in procuring volunteers." 

1864. June 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for 
three years and be credited to the town. 

1865. March 6th, Ten thousand dollars were appropriated 
for aid to the families of volunteers, and the treasurer was 
authorized to borrow that amount. 

Rockport furnished three hundred and seventy-one men for 
the military service, and thirty-nine for the naval service, which 
was a surplus of sixty-three over and above all demands. Of 
those in the military service, eleven were commissioned officers. 
The total amount of money appropriated and expended on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-nine 
thousand three hundred and twenty-eight dollars and eighty- 
one cents ($29,328.81). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the 
four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed to 
it by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $904.89; 
in 1862, $5,542.51 ; in 1863, $8,422.92 ; in 1864, $6,620.73 ; 
in 1865, $4,200.00. Total amount, $25,691.05. 

The ladies of Rockport were active during the whole of the 
war in their efforts in behalf of the soldiers. 

Rowley. — Incorporated Sept. 4, 1639. Population in 
1860, 1,278 ; in 1865, 1,196. Valuation in 1860, $484,701 ; 
in 1865, $511,171. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Phinias N. Dodge, 
Moses P. Payson, Edward H. Potter; in 1863, Edward H. 
Potter, Joseph Hale, Luther Moody; in 1864 and 1865, 
Edward H. Potter, William C. Foster, Amos Bishop. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was John S. 



ROWLEY. 233 

Prince. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Samuel P. 
Jewett ; in 1863 and 1864, John S. Prince; in 1865, J. Scott 
Todd. 

1861. The first town-meeting, to act upon matters relating 
to the war, was held on the 30th of April, at which two thou- 
sand dollars were appropriated for the purpose of purchasing 
a new uniform for the militia company organized in the town, 
and for such other citizens of Rowley as may volunteer for 
military service in the war ; also, to provide for the comfortable 
support of their families during their absence. The following 
gentlemen were chosen a committee " to carry the votes of the 
town into practical effect : " Rev. John Pike, Rev. A. X. Carr, 
D. N. Prince, Luther Moody, John Harris, E. II. Potter, 
B. H. Smith, P. N. Dodge, B. D. Appleton, Albert Titcomb, 
Milton Todd, and Nathan Todd. The selectmen, with the 
consent of the conmiittee, were authorized to borrow money in 
such sums as they might deem proper. On the 7th of May it 
was voted that the committee " provide uniforms for the com- 
pany forthwith ; " also voted, to pay each soldier belonging 
to the town five dollars a month, while in active service, in 
addition to his Government pay. The remainder of the two 
thousand dollars, if any there should be, was to be expended as 
the committee should think best, in furnishing assistance to the 
soldiers' families. June 24th, The town voted to pay State 
aid to the families of volunteers, as provided by the act of the 
Legislature in relation to that subject, recently approved by 
the Governor ; the i)ayment to commence when the soldier went 
into camp. 

1862. A special town-meeting was held on tlie 15th of 
July, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of seventy-five 
dollars to each volunteer, to the number of fifteen, who would 
enlist for three years, and be mustered in to the military service 
and credited to the quota of the town. On the 11th of August 
another meeting was held, at wliich the above bounty was in- 
creased to two hundred dollars, and a vote passed to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' 
service, and State aid to be allowed to the family of each. On 
the 8th of September the bounty to nine-months volunteers was 



234 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

increased to two hundred dollars. On the 3d of December the 
selectmen were directed to ascertain the exact number of men 
demanded of the town to complete its quota under the pending 
calls of the President for volunteers, and that they fill it up by 
''enlisting inhabitants of the town, if such can be obtained;** 
and if not, then by enlisting men from other places. 

1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the 
town, in its corporate capacity, during this year, in regard to 
furnishing men, or for the payment of State aid to soldiers* 
families, although recruiting was continued, and State aid was 
furnished as before. 

1864. On the 14th of June a special town-meeting was 
held, at which it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who would enlist for 
three years, and be mustered in to the military service and prop- 
erly credited to the quota of the town ; and if it was found 
that other towns paid a larger bounty, then the selectmen were 
authorized to pay each volunteer " such a bounty as in their 
judgment it was necessary, in order to complete the quota of 
the town." This appears to have been the j)ractice of the town 
until the close of the war. 

Rowley furnished one hundred and twenty-nine men for the 
war, which was a surplus of fourteen over and above all de- 
mands. Five were commissioned oflicers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid to the families of volunteers, 
was twelve thousand three hundred and seventy-five dollars 
($12,375.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
the payment of State aid to families of soldiers during the four 
years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $985.82 ; in 1862, 
$2,496.29; in 1863, $8,156.67 ; in 1864, $3,636.82 ; in 1865, 
$2,400.00. Total amount, $17,675.60. 

Salem. — Incorporated June 24, 1629. Population in 
1860, 22,252; in 1865, 21,197. Valuation in 1860, $14,- 
722,500; in 1865, $16,192,359. 



8ALKM. 235 

In 1861, Stephen P. Webb, mayor; John Dwycr, Francis 
Brown, John B. Fisk, Dana Z. Smith, Daniel Stoddard, Charles 
Upton, aldermen. In 18()2, Stephen P. Webb, mayor ; Stephen 
A. Chase, John B. Fisk, Francis AV. Pickman, Franklin T. San- 
bom, Dana Z. Smith, Daniel Stoddard, aldermen. In 1863, 
Stephen G. Wheatland, mayor; George R. Chapman, John B. 
Fisk, Daniel H. Mansfield, Francis W. Pickman, Franklin T. 
Sanborn, John Webster, aldermen. In 1864, Stephen G. 
Wheatland, mayor; John Barlow, George R. Chapman, Daniel 
H. Mansfield, Nathaniel G. Symonds, John Webster, Peter 
Silver, aldermen. In 1865, Joseph B. T. Osgood, mayor ; 
John Barlow, George R. Chapman, Henry M. Brooks, Abner 
C. Goodell, Jr., Daniel H. Mansfield, Simon Stodder, alder- 
men. 

The city-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Joseph Cloutman, Jr. ; 
in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Stephen P. Webb. The city-treas- 
urer during all of these years was Charles E. Symonds. 

1861. The first vote passed by the city council, having 
relation to the war, was on the 19th of Ajml, when it was — 

Ordered, That the sum of fifteen thousaDd dollars be, and hereby is, 
appropriated for the benefit of the families of those of our fellow-citi- 
zens who have so nobly and promptly responded, or may hereafter 
respond, to the call of their country ; and that the same be expended 
nnder the direction of a Joint Special Committee. 

Salem had three companies of volunteer militia, which en- 
tered the military service under the first call of the President 
for troops for three months' service in April, 1861 ; namely, 
companies A and H in the Fifth Regiment, and Company I 
in the Eighth Regiment. On the 22d of April the city council 
passed the following : — 

Ordered^ That the Joint Special Committee on Relief for Families, 
appointed at the last meeting of the city council, be authorized to 
designate and procure some suitable place as a barrack and parade- 
ground in our harbor, or elsewhere within the limits of the city, for 
such volunteer companies as have been or may be enlisted in this city 
for service under the General Government; and their attention is 
directed to the island, with a house already upon it suitable for that 
purpose. 



236 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Ordered^ That the sum of one thousand dollars be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated for furnishing rations for such volunteer com- 
panies as may be encamped within the limits of the city, to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the Joint Special Committee appointed 
April 19th. 

On the 26th of April an order was passed directing the 
Joint Special Committee to expend from the appropriations 
already made five hundred dollars for uniforms for the members 
of the Light Artillery Company of Salem, and two hundred 
dollars for uniforms for the new volunteer company organized 
by Captain Coggswelh Seven hundred dollars were appropri- 
ated for building barracks on the camp ground on AVinter 
Island. December 9th, Five thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers 
for the months of December and January ensuing; and the 
treasurer, under the direction of the Joint Standing Committee 
on Finance, was authorized to borrow the money. 

1862. January 27th, Twenty thousand dollars were ap- 
propriated for the payment of State aid to the families of 
volunteers. July 19th, Twenty-five thousand dollars were 
appropriated to encourage the enlistment of volunteers ; each 
inhabitant of Salem who should enlist and be mustered in to 
the military service, and be credited to the quota of the city, 
on or before the 25th inst., was to receive a bounty of seventy- 
five dollars ; the recruiting of volunteers and the payment of 
bounties to be under the direction of the Joint Special Com- 
mittee, who were requested to act in concert " with tlie citizens' 
General Recruiting Committee." July 25th, So much of the 
order passed on the 19th of July as restricted the payment of 
bounties to the inhabitants of Salem who should enlist j)rior to 
the 25th of the month was rescinded ; and an order was passed 
making the bounty to each volunteer who should enlist in mili- 
tary organizations already in the field one hundred and ten 
dollars^ and to those who should enlist in new organizations a 
bounty of one hundred dollars, such enlistment to be on or 
before the 15th of August, and paid when the men are mus- 
tered in and credited to the quota of Salem. Eleven thousand 
dollars were appropriated for the payment of the same, and one 



SALEM. 237 

thousand dollars for Incidental recruiting expenses. On the 
25th of August it was — 

Ordered^ That the sura of twenty thousand dollars be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated for the purpose of encouraging volunteers under 
the recent call of the President for three hundred thousand men for 
nine mouths' service. Of this sum, one hundred dollars shall be paid 
to each non-commissioned officer and private who lias heretofore 
enlisted, or shall this week enlist, and hereafter be accepted as a part 
of the quota of Salem under said call, and have been mustered into the 
service of the United States. 

On the 25th of November ten thousand dollars were appro- 
priated to encourage recruiting ; and it was ordered to pay a 
bounty of two hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer for three years* service, and one hundred dollars to each 
volunteer for nine months' service, who shall enlist and be cred- 
ited to the quota of the city. 

1863. On the 22d of June it was — 

Ordered^ That the city of Salem elects to raise and pay its propor- 
tion of the tax to be apportioned and assessed under chapter 218 of 
the Statutes of 1863, approved April 29, 1863, in the manner pointed 
out in the 9th section of that act ; and in case the charges against the 
city exceeds its credits, the treasurer is directed to pay such excess 
to the treasurer of the G)mmonwealth ; and in case the credits exceed 
the charges, the treasurer of the city is authorized to receive such 
excess from the treasurer of the Commonwealth, and to give a receipt 
in full. 

The city-treasurer's report, made in compliance with the 
above-named act, showed that the number of three-years men, 
under the two calls of the President in the months of July 
and August, 1862, to whom bounties were paid, was three 
hundred and eighty-six (386) ; number of nine-months men to 
whom bounties were paid, one hundred and sixty-two (162), 
making a total of five hundred and forty-eight (548). 

Amount of bounties paid to three-years men, §48,400.00 
„ „ „ „ nine-months men, 10,200.00 



Total amount paid under the two calls, $64,600.00 



238 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE EEBELLIOK. 

On the 14th of August five thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated " to aid in the completion of the defences of Salem Harbor, 
now being constructed by the National authorities.** The 
money was to be expended by the City Committee on Military 
Affairs. 

1864. June 13th, Twelve thousand five hundred dollars 
were appropriated " for the payment of bounties to volunteers 
in the United-States service, on account of the city of Salem.** 
July 25th, Ordered, that the sum of twenty thousand dollars 
be, and hereby is, appropriated to the relief of families of volun- 
teers. Twenty thousand dollars were also appropriated for the 
payment of bounties to volunteers, to fill the quota of Salem 
under the recent call of the President dated July 18, 1864; 
the money to be expended under the direction of the Committee 
on Military Affairs. December 16th, Twenty-five thousand 
dollars additional were appropriated for the same purpose, with 
the restriction that the bounty to each volunteer should not 
exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

Salem furnished twenty-seven hundred and eighty-nine men 
for the war, which was a surplus of one hundred and forty- 
eight over and above all demands. One hundred and fifty- 
eight were commissioned officers. The whole amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the city on account of the 
war, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred and six thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-five dollars ($106,885.00). 

Large sums were raised in the several wards for substitutes, 
representative recruits, &c., of which no account can be given. 
On the first call for men the citizens raised sixteen thousand 
dollars for aid to soldiers* families, which was not refunded by 
the city, and is not therefore included in the above. 

In addition to these amounts there were appropriated and 
expended for State aid to the families of soldiers, and subse- 
quently refunded to the city by the Commonwealth, the follow- 
ing sums : In 1861, $12,722.29 ; in 1862, $51,850.50; in 1863, 
$62,821.00; in 1864, $57,000.00; in 1865, $34,000.00. 
Total amount, $218,123.79. 

The city-clerk informs us that "the ladies of Salem, besides 
doing much work for the soldiers, paid for many recruits, and 



SALISBURY. 239 

raised money for clothing, hospital necessaries, &c., of which it 
would be impossible now to obtain particulars." 

Salisbury. — Incorporated Oct. 7, 1(540. Population in 
1860, 3,310 ; in 1865, 3,609. Valuation in 1860, $1,145,413 ; 
in 1865, $1,680,089. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Thomas J. Clark, Benjamin E. 
Fifield, John True; in 1862, Thomas J. Clark, Benjamin 
E. Fifield, William S. Pettengill; in 1863, Thomas J. Clark, 
Benjamin E. Fifield, Moses K. Pike ; in 1864, Thomas J. 
Clark, Benjamin E. Fifield, William S. Pettengill; in 1865, 
Thomas J. Clark, Benjamin E. Fifield, Streeter Evans. 

The town-clerk during all of the years of the war was 
Azor O. Webster. The town- treasurer in 1861 was Eben 
W.Tucker; in 1862 and 1863, Morrill C. Osgood; in 1864 
and 1865, George Morrill. 

1861. On the 20th of April, the day after the Massachu- 
setts Sixth Eegiment was attacked in Baltimore, one hundred 
young men of Salisbury formed a military company, which 
they named " The Wallace Guards," in honor of Edward Wal- 
lace, a citizen of the town, " who was the first to oflfer a loan of 
one hundred dollars without interest to the Government, and to 
whom was sent, by the Secretary of the Treasury (Governor 
Chase) the first treasury note that was issued by the depart- 
ment." Mr. Wallace was a lame man, and therefore incapacitated 
for military service ; but " he gave of his earnings seventy-five 
dollars to the man who would supply his place." On the 26th 
of April a citizens' war-meeting was held. R. W. Robinson 
was chosen to preside, assisted by a large number of vice-presi- 
dents and secretaries. A series of resolutions was presented by 
Rev. B. P. Byrum, which were unanimously adopted, one of 
which, as showing the patriotic spirit which pervaded the whole, 
was as follows : — 

Resolved, That we assure the Government of our profound and 
nndiminished attachment, and we tender to it a vigorous support and 
defence in any and every way that duty and fidelity may demand. 

The meeting was ably addressed by Mr. Byrum, Rev. T. D. 



240 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

P. Stone, and W. C. Binney, Esq., who also presented resolu- 
tions recommending that an appropriation be made by the town 
and the adjoining town of Amesbury of five thousand dollars 
for the benefit of volunteers and their families. " The resolutions 
were adopted with hearty cheers." A committee of seven from 
each town was appointed to raise money, and a finance commit- 
tee was chosen. Several hundred dollars were subscribed on 
the spot, the chairman of the meeting heading the list with one 
hundred dollars ; and the same amount was subscribed by 
Edward Wallace, " who made his way through the crowd on 
crutches." 

The first legal town-meeting was held April 27th, at which 
five thousand dollars were appropriated to aid the AVallace 
Guard ; and it was voted that enough be paid by the town to 
make the pay of each volunteer twenty dollars a month while in 
active service, and " that their families be well cared for." * 

1862. July 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dol- 
lars to volunteers, to the number of forty-nine, who should enlist 
for three years, and be credited to the quota of the town. The 
selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 
August 15th, Voted, to raise the bounty to volunteers for three 
years' service to three hundred dollars, and to pay volunteers for 
nine months' service a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars. 

1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the 
town during this year to provide for its contingent of men. 

1864. May 14th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years' service 
who shall be mustered in and credited to the town. This 
bounty continued to be paid until the end of the Rebellion. 

Salisbury furnished three hundred and forty-seven men for 
the war, and had a surplus of twenty-six over and above 
all demands. f Ten were commissioned officers. The whole 

♦ The delay of the Government to accept the services of this company 
caused about twenty of the men to join a Newburj-port company, which went to 
New York and joined the Fortieth Regiment of that State. Their places were 
soon filled, and the Wallace Guards afterwards j<»ined the Seventeenth Regiment 
Massachusetts Volunteers, and went to the front. 

t The Salisbury men who joined the New-York regiment did not count in 
the quotas of the town, and are therefore not included in the surplus furnished. 



SAUGU8. 241 

amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-three 
thousand one hundred and eighty-three dollars and thirty cents 
($33,183.30). 

The amount of money raised and appropriated by the town 
for tlie payment of State aid to the families of volunteers dur- 
ing the four years of the war, and afterwards reimbursed by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $490.08; in 1862, 
$4,045.48; in 1863, $5,780.86; in 1864, $5,519.19; in 
1865, $5,100.00. Total amount, $20,935.61. 

The ladies of Salisbury formed a Soldiers' Aid Society early 
in the war to furnish under-clothing and other material for the 
soldiers, and to aid and assist their families. Several fairs were 
held by them to raise funds. Xearly twelve hundred dollars 
were raised by voluntary contribution, to which the adjoining 
town of Amesbury furnished its proportion. 

Saugus. — Incorporated Feb. 17, 1815. Population in 
I860, 2,024; in 1865, 2,006. Valuation in 1860, $1,148,- 
128; in 1865, $1,300,074. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William H. Newhall, George 
H. Sweetaer, Josiah Starr; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, 
William H. Newhall, George H. Sweetser, Solomon Snow, 

The town-clerk during all these years was William H. New- 
hall, and the town-treasurer during the same period was Julian 
D. Lawrence. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 30th of April, at which 
Samuel Hawkes, William H. Newhall, George H. Sweetser, 
Josiah Starr, and Artemas Edmonds were chosen a committee 
to fix upon what compensation should be paid to citizens of the 
town when called into the military service, and for the support 
of their families while they are absent. Five thousand dollars 
were appropriated, subject to the order of the committee. If a 
sufficient number of citizens volunteer to form a military com- 
pany, each member was to be furnished with a uniform and 
*' one of Colt's best revolvers ; " the cost not to exceed one 

thousand dollars. 

16 



242 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1^62. July 23(1, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for three years, and 
be credited to the quota of the town. Four thousand dollars 
were appropriated to pay bounties and expenses of recruiting. 
August 25th, On motion of Herbert B. Newhall, it was re- 
solved, *'That the citizens of Saugus believe it their duty 
to furnish at any cost its quota of three hundred thousand 
nine-months men." A bounty of one hundred dollars was 
authorized to be paid to each nine-months volunteer ; and the 
treasurer, with the advice of the selectmen, was authorized to 
borrow, not exceeding ten thousand dollars. November 25th, 
The selectmen were authorized to enlist men living in other 
places to fill the quota of the town, if it be necessary. 

1863. November 3d, On motion of H. G. Hcrrick, it was 
resolved " by the inhabitants of Saugus, that in hearty re- 
sponse to the President's proclamation for more men, and with 
a firm purpose to sustain the National Administration in the 
most vigorous prosecution of the war, until the last vestige of 
armed and organized rebellion shall be destroyed, and with 
an unyielding and uncompromising devotion to the Federal 
Union, we will raise our quota of men before the 5th of Janu- 
ary, 1864." 

The selectmen were directed to take such measures as they 
may deem best to carry out the purpose of the resolution. 

1864. February 20th, Four thousand dollars were appro- 
priated for recruiting purposes, to be expended under the 
authority of the selectmen. December 18th, The bounty to 
volunteers for three years' service was fixed at one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars. 

Saugus furnished two hundred and ten men for the war, 
which was a surplus of seventeen over and above all demands. 
Two were connnissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was sixteen thousand two hundred and seventy-six 
dollars and thirty-six cents ($16,276.36). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during the 
four years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid by the 



SOUTH DANVER8. 243 

Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $803.00; in 1862, 
$3,698.04; in 1863, $5,935.69 ; in 1864, $5,500.00 ; in 1865, 
$3,400.00. Total amount, $19,386.73. 

The ladies of Saugus formed a Soldiers' Aid Society, which 
was active in good works for the soldiers all through the war. 

South Dani'ers (now Peabody). — Incorporated May 18, 
1855 ; name changed to Peabody April 13, 1868. Population 
in 1860, 6,549; in 1865, 6,050. Valuation in 1860, $3,613,- 
408 ; in 1865, $3,819,766. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William Walcott, Miles O. 
Stanley, Nathan H. Poor; in 1862, Miles O. Stanley, Nathan 
H. Poor, John C. Burbeck ; in 1863 and 1864, Joseph Poor, 
Alpheus W. Bancroft, Dana Woodbury ; in 1865, Joseph Poor, 
Dana Woodbury, George F. Sanger. 

The town-clerk during all of these years was Nathan H. 
Poor, and the town-treasurer for the same period was Francis 
Baker. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act on matters relat- 
ing to the war, was held on tlie 2l8t of May ; at which it was 
voted to appropriate not exceeding two thousand dollars, to be 
applied by the selectmen in aiding the families and dependants 
of volunteers of that town who may have enlisted or shall enlist 
in the military service. A committee was appointed to solicit 
subscriptions to compensate the members of Captain Bancroft's 
company for time spent in drilling. September 27th, An addi- 
tional one thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid to 
soldiers' families. 

1862. July 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and fifty dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three 
years, and be credited to the quota of the town. A committee 
of five from each school -district was chosen to co-operate with a 
committee chosen at a general meeting of citizens in obtain- 
ing recruits. August 25th, The following resolutions were 
adopted : — 

Resolved^ That the citizens of South Danvers desire once more to 
pledge their fidelity to the sacred cause of American union, and their 
unalterable determination never to falter in their efforts to maintain its 



244 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

integrity and perpetuate its blessings ; that they will not measure their 
sense of duty by their legal obligations, nor pause to inquire whether 
they have done more or less than their neighbors ; but that, like their 
fathers in Revolutionary days, they will do all they can, to the extent of 
the means with which God has endowed them, in behalf of the cause 
of Constitutional Government and the salvation of their beloved 
country. 

JResolvedy That South Danvers, expressing in her municipal capacity 
the feelings and wishes of her individual citizens, hereby declares her 
hearty appreciation of the patriotism of her sons who have enlisted, 
and are now enlisting, to serve in defence of the Union, and faithfully 
pledges her fostering care in time of need of the families of her brave 
soldiers, and her lively gratitude for the services, and her blessings 
upon the lives of those who, in serving their country in the hour of 
danger, confer enduring honor upon their native or adopted town ; their 
names will illumine her annals, and be handed down in affectionate 
remembrance to future generations. 

A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid 
to each volunteer who should enlist for nine months' service in 
the company then being recruited by Robert S. Daniels, Jr. 

18G4. June 3d, The bounty to volunteers for three years' 
service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. A 
committee was chosen to assist the selectmen in recruiting. 

1865. January 2d, Eight thousand dollars were appro- 
priated for recruiting purposes. 

South Danvers furnished seven hundred and forty-four men 
for the war, which was a surplus of fifty-one over and above all 
demands. Thirty-six were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-two 
thousand and six hundred dollars ($32,600.00). Tliis docs not 
include nineteen thousand dollars which were raised by private 
subscription to pay bounties and encourage recruiting ; nor 
does it include four thousand dollars which were voluntarily 
contributed at a meeting of citizens held on the 18th of May, 
1861, to assist the families of volunteers. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the four years of the war, and afterwards reimbursed by the 



8WAMPSC0TT. 245 

Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $4,858.60 ; in 1862, 
$16,874.32; in 1863, $16,744.94; in 1864, $14,500.00 ; in 
1865, $7,800.00. Total amount, $60,777.86. 

SwAMPSCOTT. — Incorporated May 21, 1852. Population 
in 1860, 1,530 ; in 1865, 1,619. Valuation in 1860, $1,043,- 
853; in 1865, $1,449,855. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John P. Palmer, S. 
H. Wardwell, Joseph Stanley ; in 1863, H. J. Thing, Elbridge 
G. Foster, Philander Holden ; in 1864, John P. Palmer, E. 
W. Wardwell, Sylvester T. Beers ; in 1865, John P. Palmer, 
Sylvester T. Beers, Elbridge G. Foster. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, was 
John L. Segar.* The town-treasurer in 1861 was John 
Brooks; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Holman Millett. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting called to act upon matters 
relating to the war was held on the 10th of July, at which it 
was voted to pay aid to the soldiers' families to a larger amount 
than as provided by the act of the Legislature, passed at the 
extra session ; and eight hundred dollars were appropriated for 
that purpose. 

1862. On the 2d of April two thousand dollars were appro- 
priated, and placed in the hands of the selectmen to be used by 
them as they should think best in aid of the families of soldiers 
belonging to Swampscott, independent of the State aid as pro- 
vided by law. July — , The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer, to the number 
of twenty, who should enlist for three years and be mustered 
into the military service, and properly credited to the quota of 
the town. Four thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the 
same. On the 1st of September another meeting was held, at 
which the town voted to authorize the payment of a bounty of 
two hundred dollars "to each citizen of the town who may 
enlist in the military service of the country for nine months' 
service." 

1863. No action by the town, in its corporate capacity, 



Mr. Scgar waa in active military service for several months during the 
While absent, Samuel O. IngalU filled the vacancy. 



246 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

appears to have been necessary during this year to obtain 
recruits and pay aid to the soldiers' families, although recruiting 
was continued by the selectmen, and State aid was continued to 
be paid to the fiimilies of the soldiers. 

1864. On the 2d of April, after due consideration, a sum 
of money was appropriated sufficient to meet all demands 
against the town made by volunteers for extra State aid for their 
families, as promised them by a vote of the town passed July 
10, 1861. The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall 
enlist for three years, and be mustered into the military service 
and credited to the quota of the town, under the then pending 
call of the President for men, and under whatever subsequent 
call that may be issued by him for more volunteers during the 
year. Five thousand dollars were appropriated to pay said 
bounties and State aid to the families of volunteers. This con- 
tinued until the end of the war. 

Swampscott furnished two hundred and nine men for the 
war, which was a surplus of twenty-two over and above all 
demands. Two were commissioned officers. The total amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-seven thousand 
three hundred and seventy-five dollars ($27,375.00). In addi- 
tion to this sum, there were raised by private subscription, for 
recruiting puq)08es, forty-four hundred dollars ; and a further 
sum for the same purpose was raised by a voluntary tax of 
thirty dollars, imposed upon each person residing in the town 
who was liable to be drafted, which was cheerfully met and paid 
in all but six cases. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town in 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $854.95 ; in 
1862, $3,036.44; in 1863, $3,632.42; in 1864, $2,400.00 ; 
in 1865, $1,100.00. Total amount, $11,023.81. 

ToPSFiELD. — Incorporated Oct. 18, 1650. Population in 
1860, 1,292; in 1865, 1,212. Valuation in 1860, $624,769; 
m 1865, $687,610. 



TOPSFIELD. 247 

The selectmen in 1861 were John Wright, A. S. Peabody, 
Dudley Bradstreet ; in 18G2, 1863, and 1864, A. S. Peabody, 
Samuel Todd, Dudley Bradstreet; in 1865, Jacob Foster, 
J. W. Batchelder, David Clark. 

The town-clerk during all these years was J. P. Towne. 
The town-treasurer in 1861 was Benjamin Kimball; in 1862, 
1863, and 1864, Nehemiah Balch ; in 18(55, Jeremiah Balch. 

1861. A leffal town-meetinj' was held Mav 17th, at which 
the following preamble and resolutions were adopted : — 

Considering the present position of our country, not a< waging war 
against the South, nor a party device, but an essay of the poo|>le to 
sustain their own rights, preserve their own institutions, give elficiency 
to their own laws, invigorate their execution, and perpetuate the 
inheritance of our fathers unimpaired, — 

Resolved, That we, the loyal people of Topsfield, in town-meeting 
assembled, constitute ourselves a National Guard for the preservation 
of our national integrity. 

Resolved J That we appropriate the sum of three thousand dollars to 
meet the exigency of a national requisition on any detachment of our 
National Guard, giving a bounty of ten dollars to each one who may 
conform to this requisition. 

Resolved^ That there be a discretionary committee of five, chosen by 
ballot, to furnish good and sufRcient support from such appropriation 
to the families of those who may be detailed by our Government into 
its service, giving said committee power to draw on our treasury for 
the same. 

Voted, to appropriate a sufficient sum to pay each soldier 
twenty dollars a month while in the military service. 

1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit 
of the town for three years' military service ; and the treasurer 
was authorized to borrow nineteen hundred dollars to pay the 
same, and to pay State aid to the families. The selectmen were 
requested to use their utmost endeavors to procure enlistments. 
August 12th, The bounty to volunteers was raised to two hun- 
dred dollars for each inhabitant enlisting to the credit of the 
town. A committee of seven was chosen by ballot to help the 
selectmen in recruiting men in the town ; and if a sufficient 
number of the inhabitants could not be enlisted within two davs 



248 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

to fill the quota, "then to secure them wherever they may be 
obtained." The treasurer was authorized to borrow monev. It 
was also voted that " any person who may be drafted from this 
town during the war shall be liberally provided for during his 
term of service." August 20th, The selectmen were directed to 
take legal advice in regard to raising money and paying monthly 
pay to volunteers, and to be governed thereby. August 29th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each 
volunteer enlisting for nine months' military service, to the credit 
of the town : and the treasurer was authorized to borrow monev- 

1863. No vote appears to have been taken during this year 
in regard to military matters. 

1864. February 9th, A committee of five was chosen by 
ballot to aid the selectmen in recruiting men to fill the quota of 
the town. April 12th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit 
of the town ; and the treasurer was authorized to pay three 
hundred and seventy-five dollars to certain citizens who had 
advanced this amount for recruiting purposes. June 29th, 
The same amount of bounty was voted to be paid to any one 
enlisting to the credit of the town in the army or navy. July 
28th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twentv-seven 
hundred and fifty dollars to pay bounties, and the selectmen 
were directed to continue recruiting. Nothing further of 
importance appears to have been done during the year, and 
recruitin<j: continued. 

18G5. May 19th, The town voted to raise thirty-four hun- 
dred and sixty dollars to repay money advanced by individual 
citizens for the encouragement of recruiting. 

Topsfield furnished one hundred and thirteen men for the 
war, which was a surplus of six over and above all demands. 
Five were commissioned oflBcers. The whole amount of monev 
appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, ex- 
clusive of State aid, was fourteen thousand seven hundred and 
forty-six dollars and thirty-five cents ($14,746.35). 

The amount of money raised and expended l)y the town in 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the four years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed 



WENHAM. 249 

by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 18G1, $307.46; 
in 1862, $1,628.58 ; in 1863, $2,259.00 ; in 1864, $2,020.00 ; 
in 1865, $1,419.06. Total amount, $7,634.10. 

The ladies of Topsfield worked heartily in the cause of the 
soldiers during the war, and forwarded to the army money, 
clothing, and hospital stores to the value of five hundred 
dollars. 

Wenham. — Incorporated May 10, 1643. Population in 
1860, 1,105; in 1865^ 591. Valuation in 1860, $550,780; 
in 1865, $463,558. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Samuel Porter, William Moul- 
ton, John Gentlee ; in 1862, Samuel Porter, John Gentlee, 
Solomon E. Kimball ; in 1863, Rufus A. Dodge, Francis M. 
Dodge, Solomon E. Kimball ; in 1864, Rufus A. Dodge, John 
Gentlee, Solomon E. Kimball ; in 1865, Rufus A. Dodge, 
Francis M. Dodge, William B. Morgan. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was Benjamin C. Putnam; in 
1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Joseph Cook. The town- 
treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Stephen Dodge; in 1863, 
1864, and 1865, Amos Gould. 

1861. At a legal town-meeting held on the 7th of May, one 
thousand dollars were appropriated to aid the families of citizens 
who have enlisted, or may enlist, ** in the service of their country 
in the present war." The selectmen, together with Amos F. 
Hobbs and Amos Gould, were appointed to visit the families 
"and appropriate the money as in their judgment it is needed." 
In addition to the appropriation, one hundred and fifty dollars 
were raised by private subscription and placed in the hands of 
the committee. 

1862. April 7th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
two thousand dollars for aid to soldiers' families during the year. 
July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty 
dollars to each volunteer (to the number of fifteen) who shall 
enlist in the military service for three years, and be credited to 
the town, provided they enlist within thirty days and are legal 
citizens of the town. August 5th, The same bounty was voted 
to nine-months volunteers. December 3d, The selectmen 



250 MxVSSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

were directed "to open the papers this evening in the town 
room, to give a chance to any of the citizens of the town who 
wish to enlist/' The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money. 

1863. April 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
two thousand dollars for aid to soldiers' families, and the select- 
men were directed to pay aid " to those families of volunteers 
who have died or returned disabled from the service." 

1864. July 27th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting for three 
years to the credit of the town, "under any future call of the 
President ; " and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money 
to pay the same. 

Wenham furnished one hundred and fifty men for the war, 
which was a surplus of fifteen over and above all demands. 
Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was six thousand seven hundred and 
sixty-five dollars ($6,765.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the four years of the war in the payment of State aid to the 
families of volunteers, and which was afterwards reimbursed by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $?S55.83 ; in 
1862, $2,071.82; in 1863, $2,458.74; in 1864, $2,426.88 ; 
in 1865, $1,300.00. Total amount, $9,113.27. 

We have an account of the articles and money furnished by 
the ladies of Wenham to the soldiers during the war, the 
money value of which it would be as difficult to estimate as it 
would be to fix by the same standard the " benevolence, love, and 
patriotism which prompted their action. It only shows how- 
noble and generous they were." 

West Newbury. — Incorporated June 14, 1820. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 2,202; in 1865, 2,088. Valuation in 1860, 
$938,741 ; in 1865, $940,919. 

The selectmen in 1861 were N. F. Emery, Ichabod Titcomb, 
E. P. Stanwood ; in 1862, Ichabod Titcomb, Moses Newell, 
N. F. Emery ; in 1863, William Merrill, George Emery, Dean 



WEST NEAVBURY. 251 

R. Stanwood ; in 1864, William Merrill, George Emery ; in 
1865, William Merrill, Dean R. Stanwood, N. F. Emery. 

The town-clerk durinfj all the years of the war was J. C. 
Carr.* The town -treasurer during the same vears was Enoch 
D. Chase. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 29th of April, at which the 
selectmen were given authority to borrow money whenever the 
wants of the volunteers or their families should render it neces- 
sary. Two thousand dollars were set apart as a war emergency 
fund. It was also voted to pay each member of the Military Rifle 
Company belonging to West Newbury, when called into active 
service, ten dollars a month while in said service, and ten 
dollars a month to each of their families. All other military 
emergencies of the town were placed under the direction of the 
selectmen, to "act at their discretion." One hundred and fifty 
dollars were appropriated to pay for uniforms. 

1862. At a town-meeting held on the 24th of July, it was 
vot^d to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each 
volunteer who should enlist for three years, and be mustered 
into the military service, and credited to the quota of the town ; 
and the selectmen were authorized to borrow two thousand dol- 
lars to pay the same. A committee of seventeen persons, living 
in various parts of the town, were chosen to canvass the town 
for volunteers. On the loth of August the town voted to pay 
the same amount of bounty to each volunteer who would enlist 
in the nine months' service, and be credited to the quota of the 
town. The treasurer was authorized to borrow four thousand 
dollars, "if need be" to pay the same. A committee of five 
was appointed to carry into effect the action of the town, who 
were "to be all Union men." August 30th, The bounty to 
nine-months volunteers was increased to two hundred and fifty 
dollars, which amount was directed to be paid " until the quota is 
filled ; " and the treasurer was directed to borrow two thousand 
dollars to meet the increased expenditure. September 15th, 
The treasurer was directed to borrow a larger sum for the 

* Mr. Carr had been town-clerk from 1834. 



252 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

payment of bounties to volunteers and State aid to their 
families. 

1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the 
town, in its corporate capacity, during this year in relation to 
the war, though recruiting was continued, and State aid was 
paid to the soldiers' families as before. 

1864. On the 29th of March the selectmen were directed 
** to keep on recruiting," and to " fill the quota of the town on 
the best possible terms." This course appears to have been pur- 
sued until the end of the war. 

West Newbury furnished two hundred and sixty-seven men 
for the war, which was a surplus of thirty-four over and above 
all demands. Twelve were commissioned officers. The total 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty- six thou- 
sand two hundred and forty dollars and forty-three cents 
($36,240.43). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war in payment of State aid to the 
families of volunteers, and which was afterwards reimbursed by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $1,694.02; in 
1862, $5,389.50; in 1863, $5,117.23 ; in 1864, $4,857.44; 
in 1865, $4,000.00. Total amount, $21,058.19. 



CHAPTER VII. 



FKANKLIN COUNTY. 



This county is bounded on the north by Windham County, 
Vermont, and a part of Cheshire County, New Hampshire ; 
east by Worcester County, south by Hampshire County, and 
west by the county of Berkshire. The surface of the county is 
elevated : the Green-Mountain range extends from north to 
south, presenting some of the wildest and most picturesque 
scenery in the State. The soil, however, broken by hills of no 
common height, is exceedingly fertile ; its numerous valleys pro- 
duce fine crops of grain and grasses ; its mountain sides afford 
rich pasturage for cattle and sheep. The Connecticut River 
flows through its centre from north to south, and the Deerfield 
and Miller's Rivers pass through rich and beautiful valleys. It 
is a quiet, pastoral region, with here and there busy manufac- 
turing towns. Greenfield is the shire town, and is widely 
known as one of the most beautiful of our New-England 
villages. 

The popuLition of Franklin County in 1860 was 31,434, in 
1865 it was 31,342, showing a decrease of 92 in the five 
years of the war. The population in 1870 was 32,635, which is 
an increase since 1865 of 1,292. The valuation of the county 
in 1860 was $12,448,961, in 1865 it was $13,048,120, which 
is an increase in five years of $599,259. 

The number of men which Franklin County furnished for 
the war, according to the returns made by the selectmen in 
1866, was 3,159, which is about two hundred less than the 
actual number. Every town in the county furnished its full 
quota upon every call made by the President for men, and each 
had a surplus over and above all demands, which in the aggre- 
gate amounted to two hundred and seventy-nine men. 



254 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The amount of money raised and expended by all the towns 
in the county on account of the war, exclusive of State aid to 
soldiers' familici^, was $372,068.52. The amount of money 
raised and expended during the years of the war for State aid 
to the soldiers' families, and which was afterwards repaid to them 
by the Commonwealth, was $155,457.38, making the aggregate 
$527,526.90. 

The following is the war record of each town in the county : — 

AsHFiELD. — Incorporated June 21, 1765. Population in 
1860, 1,302 ; in 1865, 1,221. Valuation in 1860, $606,201 ; 
in 1865, $854,719. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Josephus Crafts, A. Howes, 
Lorenzo Wait ; in 1862, Josephus Crafts, Moses Cook, Darius 
Williams; in 1863, Josephus Crafts, Nathan Knowlton, A. 
Howes; in 1864, Nathan Knowlton, A. Howes, Josiah Cross ; 
in 1865, Alvan Hall, Frederick C. Howes, Josiah Cross. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Henry S. 
Ranney. The town-treasurer in 1861 was George G. Hall ; in 
1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Nelson Gardner. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 6th of May, at which it 
was voted to pay all inhabitants of Ashfield who have enlisted, 
or who shall thereafter enlist, to the number of fifteen, twenty- 
six dollars a month while in the military service. November 
29th, The selectmen were directed to pay State aid to the fami- 
lies of volunteers, as provided by law. 

1862. August 2d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and fifty dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three 
years' service before the 10th of the month, one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each who shall enlist between the 
10th and the 20th, and one hundred to each who shall enlist 
between the 20th and the 30th of the month, to the number 
of eighteen, when mustered in and credited to the quota of 
the town. August 15th, The bounty of one hundred and fifty 
dollars was continued until the 20th of the month. Septem- 
ber 9th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to 
volunteers for nine months' service. October 15th, The select- 



ASHFIELD. 255 

men were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the 
families of deceased volunteers the same as was paid when the 
soldiers were living. November 4th, The selectmen were 
directed to pay volunteers for nine months, who went into 
C4imp, but who were not required to fill the quota of the town, 
each the sura of twenty-five dollars "for their lost time and 
other expenses." 

1863. January 17th, The selectmen were directed to pay 
nine hundred dollars to volunteers who have entered the military 
service as substitutes "to relieve the town from a draft." April 
6th, The selectmen were authorized to continue the payment of 
State aid to the families of soldiers. 

1864. April 29th, Four thousand two hundred and fifty 
dollars were raised to procure a portion of the quota of the town 
from the Commonwealth. June 4th, The selectmen were directed 
to enlist twenty men " as soon as possible," to answer for any 
future call of the President up to March, 1865. 

1865. March 6th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars each to five re-enlisted veterans. May 
10th, Voted, to raise four thousand five hundred doHars to 
refund to individuals money they had t^ubscribed in 18(54 for 
recruiting purposes. 

1866. March 5th, Six hundred and fifty dollars were appro- 
priated to erect a monument in honor of the men of Ashfield 
"who had sacrificed their lives to sustain the Government a^jainst 
the slave-holders' Rebellion." 

Ashfield furnished one hundred and twentv-four men for the 
war, which was a surplus of sixteen over and above all demands. 
One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was twenty-two thousand two hundred 
and seventy-nine dollars ($22,279.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended during the years 
of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $132.42; in 1862, $1,180.24; in 1863, $1,702.20; 
in 1864, $1,166.76; in 1865, $337.20. Total amount, 
$4,518.82. 



256 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Bernardstox. — Incorporated March 6, 1762. Population 
in 1860, 968 ; in 1865, 902. Valuation in 1860, $444,496 ; in 
1865, $484,893. 

The selectmen in 1861 were P. L. Cushman, Samuel J. 
Lyons, Imla K. Brown ; in 1862, P. L. Cushman, Justin M. 
Slate, Gains J. Green ; in 1863, P. L. Cushman, Justin M. 
Slate, John F. Hale ; in 1864, John F. Hale, Justin M. Slate, 
Bryant S. Burrows; in 1865, John F. Hale, Hymen B. But- 
ler, Bryant S. Burrows. The town-clerk and town-treasurer 
during all these years was Silas N. Brooks. 

1861. No legal town-meeting appears to have been held 
during this year, to act upon matters relating to the war. 

1862. July 22d, A meeting was held, at which Dr. William 
D wight presented resolutions which were adopted. The first 
expressed confidence in the President, and fully indorsed his 
policy to suppress "the most atrocious rebellion of modem 
times ; " second, " that we lay upon the altar of our common 
country the lives of our sons and the treasure of our people, in 
defence of the Constitution and the Union ; " third, " that the exi- 
gencies of the hour call upon old and young, rich and poor 
alike, to rally round the old flag of our fathers." Voted, to pay 
a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall 
enlist to the credit of the town, to make up the eleven persons 
called for. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money 
suificient to pay the bounty, provided that a guarantee fund be 
raised by subscription to indemnify the selectmen should the act 
be pronounced illegal. The fund was raised at once, and a 
suflScient number of young men volunteered to fill the quota. 
August 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to 
nine-months volunteers. The selectmen and treasurer were 
authorized to borrow the money and recruit the men. They 
were also directed to petition the Legislature to legalize the 
votes of the town in regard to borrowing money. 

1863. July 23d, A meeting was held, to see if the town 
would appropriate and pay three hundred dollars to each of the 
sixteen men who had been drafted. The town voted to " pass 
over the article." 

1864. April 16th, The town voted to appropriate six hun- 



BUCKLAND. 257 

dred and fifty dollars to refund to citizens money subscribed and 
paid by them to aid recruiting ; also, eight hundred and seventy- 
five dollars to pay bounties -to volunteers under " the existing 
call." Several other meetings were held during the year, at 
which money was appropriated to pay bounties to recruits and 
aid to their families. The amount of bounty to be paid each 
volunteer was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five doHars. 

Bernaixlston furnished about one hundred and four men for 
the war, which was a surplus of seventeen over and above all 
demands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town for war pur- 
poses, exclusive of State aid, was six thousand six hundred and 
ninety-four dollars and eighty-three cents ($6,694.83). 

The amount of money raised and paid by the town during the 
years of the war for State aid to the families of volunteers, and 
which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as fol- 
lows : In 1861, $46.00 ; in 1862, $625.88 ; in 1863, $1,245.76 ; 
in 1864, $1,155.55; in 1865, $900.00. Total amount, $3,- 
973.19. 

BncKiiAND. — Incorporated April 14, 1779. Population in 
1860, 1,702 ; in 1865, 1,922. Valuation in 1860, $497,592; 
in 1865, $526,468. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Samuel Toby, S. L. Bard well, 
Thomas Orcutt; in 1862, Samuel Toby, Thomas Orcutt, E. B. 
Williams ; in 1863, David Havvkes, Thomas Orcutt, E. B. Wil- 
liams ; in 1864, David Hawkes, Thomas Orcutt, J. W. Gris- 
wold ; in 1865, S. W. McKnight, S. J. Ward, Bartlett Ballard. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was 
S. L. Bardwell; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Samuel Toby. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting was held April 24th, at 
which five hundred dollars were appropriated to uniform the 
militia company in Buckland. June 24th, Voted, to pay State 
aid to the families of volunteers as provided by act of the Legis- 
lature. 

1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 

money to provide for the comfort of the soldiers' families living 

in the town. July 26th, Voted, to appropriate four hundred 

17 



258 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

dollars for the sick and wounded soldiers. September 11th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer 
enlisting for nine months to the credit of the town, and that the 
selectmen and treasurer borrow the money necessary to pay it. 
The selectmen were also directed to petition the Legislature ** to 
legalize the vote of the town." 

1863. January 24th, The selectmen were authorized to pro- 
cure substitutes for citizens who had been drafted, the bounty 
therefor not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars for 
each man. They were further instructed to get them "at the 
least rate possible." March 2d, Voted, that the selectmen pay 
all volunteers' families State aid " who, in their opinion, are in 
want." July 2 2d, A railroad bridge at Greenfield having been 
burned, a report was circulated that it was set on fire by rebels. 
The selectmen of Buckland appointed " twenty night police " to 
protect the bridges and other property in the town. August 
4th, Voted, to pay the same aid to the families of drafted men 
as was paid to the families of volunteers. December 12th, 
Voted, " that the town authorize the selectmen to use all lawful 
means to procure volunteers, and that the town shall pay their 
expenses." 

1864. March 7th, Voted, that the account for recruiting 
($3,532.55) be allowed and placed on record. March 29th, 
The selectmen were authorized to borrow twenty-five hundred 
dollars for military purposes. May 23d, Voted, to raise seventy- 
six hundred and twenty-five dollars to procure volunteers, and 
the selectmen " were to hire substitutes at the lowest possible 
expense." They were also authorized to borrow money and keep 
on recruiting until the end of the war. It was also voted unani- 
mously to refund all money advanced by citizens to procure 
volunteers. Other meetings were held, but nothing of general 
interest was transacted. 

Buckland furnished two hundred and nineteen men for the 
war, which was a surplus of twenty-eight over and above all 
demands. Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money raised and expended by the town for war purposes, 
exclusive of State aid, was thirty-one thousand five hundred 
dollars ($31,500.00). 



CHARLEMONT. 259 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to the families of volunteers, 
and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $629.90; in 1862, $1,581.31; in 1863, 
$2,411.06; in 1864, $2,782.43; in 1865, $2,400.00. Total 
amount, $9,804.70. 

Charlemont. — Incorporated June 21, 1765. Population 
in 1860, 1,075 ; in 1865, 994. Valuation in 1860, $392,972 ; 
in 1865, $367,216. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were A. L. Tyler, L. B. 
Eice, S<imuel Potter; in 1863, A. L. Tyler, Hart Leavitt, 
Samuel Potter; in 1864, A. L. Tyler, Matthew Kingman, 
L. B. Sice; in 1865, A. L. Tyler, L. B. Rice, Horace H. 
May hew. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861 was F. W. White ; 
in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Gustavus A. White ; in 1865, Horace 
H. Mayhew. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in 
its corporate capacity, in regard to the war during this year. 

1862. March 3d, Four hundred dollars were appropriated for 
aid to the families of volunteers residing in the town. Septem- 
ber 15th, The bounty to volunteers for nine months' service was 
fixed at one hundred dollars, and the amount necessary to pay 
the same to fill the quota of the town was to be assessed in 
1863 : in the mean time the selectmen were authorized to bor- 
row the money. 

1863. January 31st, Voted, to raise six hundred dollars, to 
be placed at the disposal of the selectmen to fill the quota of 
volunteers called for from the town, the same to be paid when 
the men are mustered into the service of the United States. 
November 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
$1,709.32, "being the amount apportioned by the State treas- 
urer upon the town, and appropriate the same according to the 
provisions of chapter 218, Acts of 1863." Five hundred dol- 
lars were also appropriated to pay bounties to volunteers " under 
the last call of the President." 

1864. March 7th, The bounty to volunteers for three years' 



260 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. The 
selectmen were authorized to pay the same until March, 18fi5 ; 
also, to borrow five hundred dollars, ^^ to be used in aiding the 
families of volunteers." 

Charlemont furnished one hundred and fifteen men for the 
war, which was a surplus of three over and above all demands. 
Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was fourteen thousand four hundred and 
seventy-three dollars ($14,473.00). In addition to this sura, 
eight hundred dollars were contributed by private citizens to 
encourage recruiting. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during the war, and which was 
refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$135.40; in 1862, $855.20; in 1863, $1,407.94; in 1864, 
$1,300.00 ; in 1865, $950.00. Total amount, $4,648.54. 

The ladies raised $979.75, which was expended for the com- 
fort of the soldiers. They also furnished clothing for the 
freedmen to the value of $98.25. 

CoLERAiN. — Incorporated June 30, 1761. Population in 
1860, 1,798 ; in 1865, 1,726. Valuation in 1860, $555,814 ; 
in 1865, $637,954. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Samuel D. Cole, 
Samuel N. Wilson, Ephraim H. Thompson ; in 1863, Samuel 
D. Cole, Hugh Melellen, Dennis Wilson; in 1864, Samuel D. 
Cole, O. F. Morrison, Hugh Melellen ; in 1865, David L. 
Smith, Samuel D. Handy, Joseph B. Clark. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the 
war was Jesse Cone. 

We have failed to obtain from Colerain an abstract of the war 
record from the town- books. 

Colerain furnished one hundred and ninety-two men for the 
war, which was a surplus of fourteen over and above all de- 
mands. One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-one thousand and 
fifty-three dollars ($31,053.00). 



CONWAY. 261 

The amount of money raised and expended for State aid to 
the families of volunteers during the war, and which was after- 
wards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, 
$55.14; in 1862, $660.17; in 1863, $1,746.49; in 1864, 
$2,379.69; in 1865, $2,200.00. Total amount, $7,041.49. 

Conway. — Incorporated June 16, 1767. Population in 
1860, 1,689 ; in 1865, 1,538. Valuation in 1860, $725,053 ; 
in 1865, $703,919. 

The selectmen in 1861 were E. Cooley, W. C. Campbell, 
C. Batchelder; in 1862, E. Cooley, C. Batcheldcr, Newton 
Pease; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, C. Batchelder, W. C. 
Campbell, Consider Arms. 

The town-clerk during the whole period of the war was 
H. W. Billings. The town-treasurer in the years 1861, 1862, 
and 1863, was G. Edgerton ; and in the years 1864 and 1865, 
H. W. Billings. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider questions 
relating to the war, was held on the Ist of May, at which it 
was voted to furnish each volunteer belonging to the town with 
an outfit, not exceeding twenty-five dollars ; and to pay hi in six 
dollars a month, not exceeding one year ; and to pay his family, 
if he has one, six dollars a month, '* which may be increased to 
ten dollars, at the discretion of a committee to be appointed by 
the town to have charge of the matter." Tlie committee chosen 
were E. Blake, Rev. G. M. Adams, E. D. Hamilton, J. Ing- 
ham, and Gordon Edgerton. 

1862. March 3d, The town-clerk was directed to keep a 
full and perfect record of the names of each person belonging 
to the town, who enlists in the military service of the country, 
showing the age, time of enlistment, date of discharge, death, 
&c. July 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars 
to each volunteer who is mustered into the military service for 
three years, and is credited to the town. September Ist, The 
same bounty was authorized to be paid to volunteers for the 
nine months' service. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate capacity, during this year, in regard to the war, 
although recruiting continued as before. 



262 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1864. August 18th, The selectmen having reported that 
fourteen men were required to fill the quota of the town, it 
was voted to raise seventeen hundred dollars, "to pay to or 
for each volunteer a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars." 

1865. January 6th, The 6<ame amount of bounty was voted 
to be paid to volunteers "under the present call," to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the selectmen. 

Conway furnished one hundred and fifty-eight men for the 
war, which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. 
Five were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was nine thousand three hundred and 
fifty dollars ($9,350.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to the families of volunteers, and 
which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $27.57; in 1862, $1,086.05; in 1863, 
$2,329.09; in 1864, $1,120.00; in 1865, $666.00. Total 
amount, $5,228.71. 

The ladies' "Soldiers' Aid Society" was unceasing in its 
labors for the soldiers all through the war, and sent articles 
and money to the Sanitary Commission and to the army, to the 
gross value of four thousand six hundred and thirteen dollars 
and seventy-two cents. 

Deerfield. — Incorporated May 24, 1682. Population in 
1860, 3,073; in 1865, 3,040. Valuation in 1860, $1,181,- 
066; in 1865, $1,215,423. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Elisha Wells, Allen 
Mansfield, Philo Temple; in 18(53, 1864, and 1865, Dexter 
Childs, Charles Arms, George W. Jones. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Charles 
Williams. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Asa 
Stebbins; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Elisha Wells. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
connected with the war, was held on the 2d of May, at which 
it was voted to choose a committee to raise -volunteers for 



DEERFIELD. 263 

active military service. Sixteen hundred dollars were appro- 
priated for uniforming and equipping all persons who should 
enlist from Deerfield ; and twelve hundred dollars were voted 
for the support of their families while they were absent in the 
war. It was also voted to pay each volunteer belonging to 
the town ten dollars a month, in addition to his Government 
pay, while in active service. A committee was appointed to 
borrow money suflScient for the above purposes. November 
5th, The town voted to pay State aid to the families of volun- 
teers, as provided by a law of the Commonwealth passed in 
relation thereto. 

1862. July 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer, to the number of thirty-four, who 
would enlist for three years, and be credited to the quota of 
the town. September 6th, The same amount of bounty was 
authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months' service ; 
and the treasurer was empowered to borrow, not exceeding six 
thousand dollars, to pay the same. 

1863. No special action of the town, in its corporate 
capacity, appears to have been necessary during this year. 

1864. April 4th, The town voted to pay a bounty of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer from Deer- 
field, who would enlist for three years, be mustered in, and 
credited to the quota of the town, '* under the call of the Presi- 
dent dated March 14, 1864 ; " and the treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow money to pay the same. 

Deerfield furnished three hundred and twenty men for the 
war, which was a surplus of seven over and above all demands. 
Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was twenty-three thousand four hundred 
and eighty-seven dollars and seventy-six cents ($23,487.70). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
for State aid to the families of soldiers during the years of the 
war, and afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $642.55; in 1862, $3,508.31; in 1863, 
$5,087.66; in 1864, $5,616.32; in 1865, $3,082.41. Total 
amount, $17,937.25. 



264 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The ladies of Deerfield were always active in their good 
works during the war for the benefit of the soldiers. They 
worked at home and in the sewing-circle, held fairs and festivals 
to raise funds, and were constantly forwarding '' large quantities 
of all kinds of clothing and other necessaries and luxuries " to 
the camps and hospitals. 

m 

Erving. — Incorporated April 17, 1838. Population in 
1860, 527 ; in 1865, 576. Valuation in 1860, $163,601 ; in 
1865, $173,229. 

The selectmen in 1861 were A. R. Albee, C. A. Eddy, S. 
D. Comins ; in 1862, Calvin Priest, C. A. Eddy, Lewis Whit- 
ing; in 1863, Calvin Priest, H. H. Holton, Seth H. Woodard; 
in 1864, A. R. Albee, H. H. Holton, I. E. Stone; in 1865, 
A. R. Albee, Seth H. Woodard, Noah Rankin. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Noah 
Rankin. The town- treasurer during the same period was Seth 
H. Woodard. 

The record of the proceedings of the town-meetings held in 
Erving during the war is not so full as we would have wished, 
otherwise it is quite satisfactory. 

Erving furnished fifty-eight men for the war, which was a 
surplus of four over and above all demands. None were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was two thousand three hundred and six dollars and 
fifty cents ($2,306.50).* 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, 
and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, $115.40; in 1862, $568.92; in 1863, 
$766,24 ; in 1864, $923.42 ; in 1865, $600.00. Total amount, 
$2,973.98. 

The ladies of Erving contributed to the extent of their means 
and numbers to the comfort and well-being of our sick and 

* The return made hy the selectmen in 1867 to the Legislative Committee 
places the amount at $2,875.00, a difference only of sixty-eight dollars and fifty- 
cents. 



GILL. 265 

wounded soldiers during the whole of the war. The money 
value of their contributions was about three hundred dollars. 

Gill. — Incorporated Sept. 28, 1793. Population in 1860, 
683; in 1865, 635. Valuation in 1860, $380,385; in 1865, 
$390,569. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Leonard Barton, 
Samuel P. Stratton, Ezra O. Purple ; in 1863, Henry Bascom, 
Samuel P. Stratton, Ozias Roberts ; in 1864, Simon C. Phillips, 
Samuel P. Stratton, Ezra O. Purple; in 1865, Simon C. 
Phillips, J. B. Marble, A. C. Doane. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years 
was Josiah D. Cummings. 

The record of the war votes of Gill has been furnished in a 
form different from that of the other towns. We are indebted 
to Mr. Cummings, town clerk and treasurer, for the following 
record; — 

<' During the whole war the town almost unanimously voted to 
sustain the General Government, and held repeated war-meetings to 
raise volunteers ; raised some half dozen ilag-staflTs, and procured as 
many flags, and *put things through' generally. We volunteered 
readily at the first call of the President for troops, and always after- 
ward filled our quotas, even exceeding our actual requirement This 
town in the last war with Great Britain was the only one in the 
county to volunteer, and has always had the reputation of being 
'spunky.' Always count on Gill in a war that is for sustaining the 
old flag of our fathers and the Union." 

Gill furnished sixty-six men for the war, which was a sur- 
plus of seven over and above all demands. None were commis- 
sioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was nine thousand five hundred and eight dollars 
($9,508.00).* 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to the families of soldiers during the years of the war, 

* When the order came for a draft, Mr. Cummings, the town clerk and treas- 
urer, offered to be one of ten men to volunteer " without bounty or other fee 
than the regular army pay, although he was past the draft age/' 



266 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, $64.00; in 1862, $526.80; in 1863, 
$871.00; in 1864, $636.00; in 1865, $269.49. Total 
amount, $2,367.29. 

The ladies of Gill were constantly engaged through the 
war in sewing, knitting, scraping lint, &c. They held weekly 
meetings, "and sent box after box to the seat of war. One lady 
knit eighty-three pairs of woollen socks for the soldiers alone. ** 

• Greenfield. — Incorporated June 9, 1753. Population in 
1860, 3,198; in 1865, 3,211. Valuation in 1860, $1,534,- 
425; in 1865, $1,899,806. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Alfred R. Field, Her- 
vey C. Newton, Aaron K. Warner; in 1863, Humphrey 
Stevens, Hervey C. Newton, Aaron K. Warner; in 1864, 
Humphrey Stevens, Henry L. Pratt, Frederick G. Smith ; in 
1865, Humphrey Stevens, Hervey C. Newton, Aaron K. 
Warner. 

The town-clerk during all these years was Noah S. Wells. 
The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Rufus Howland ; in 
1863 and 1864, Bela Kellogg; in 1865, Noah S. Wells. 

1861. A large meeting of the citizens of Greenfield, com- 
posed of gentlemen of all political parties, was held on the 
evening of the 20th of April, in the town hall, at which patri- 
otic speeches were made, and the following resolutions presented 
by Hon. Daniel W. Alvord were unanimously adopted : — 

Resolvedy That the safety of the Republic, the welfare of the people, 
the preservation of our liberties, imperatively require a resort to arms ; 
that force should be met by force, and treason and rebellion crushed 
by the strong hand of power. 

Resolved^ That, in an emergency like this, present party names 
should be forgotten, party prejudices and animosities buried, and all 
good citizens should stand together in the defence of our common 
country. 

Resolved, That we will give our united and hearty support to the 
administration in all lawful efforts to suppress the Rebellion ; that we 
will furnish our full proportion of means and men ; and that we 
pledge our fortunes and our lives for the defence of the Republic, and 
the maintenance of liberty. 



GREENFIELD. 267 

The first legal town-meeting was held April 29th, at which 
five thousand dollars were appropriated to fit out the " Green- 
field Guards " for the war, and for the comfort of their families 
during their absence ; also, to pay them for the time devoted to 
drilling. Theodore Leonard, William Keith, and Henry B. 
Clapp were intrusted with the disbursement of the money. 

1862. March 3d, One thousand dollars were appropriated 
for State aid to the families of volunteers. July 22d, On motion 
of Hon. George T. Davis, it was voted to pay a bounty of one 
hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting for three years, who 
is, or shall be, credited to the quota of the town ; that the 
selectmen be authorized to borrow forty-seven hundred dollars 
for the payment of bounties, twelve hundred dollars for State 
aid to soldiers' families, and five hundred dollars ^' for the relief 
of the sick and wounded soldiers of Greenfield." September 
2d, The same amount of bounty was authorized to be paid to 
volunteers for nine months' service ; and the selectmen were 
authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 

1863. March 2d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow, 
not exceeding five hundred dollars a month, for the payment of 
State aid to the families of volunteers. September 19th, The 
treasurer was authorized to borrow $6,392.86, to carry out 
the provisions of the 9th section of the act passed by the Legis- 
lature "for the reimbursements of bounties paid to volun- 
teers." 

1864. March 7th, The assessors were directed to abate the 
taxes of such volunteers absent in the army as they may think 
proper. June 29th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated 
to reimburse citizens for money expended by them in filling the 
quota of the town in 1863. July 12th, A similar vote was 
passed in favor of those who had advanced money to obtain 
volunteers in 1864. Twenty-five hundred dollars were appro- 
priated to pay bounties to volunteers who shall enlist to the 
credit of the town before the 1st of March, 1865. Five hun- 
dred dollars were voted to the families of two drafted men. 

1865. January 21st, The selectmen were authorized to pay 
a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town " under the 



268 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

late call of the President for more men." This bounty was con- 
tinued to be paid until the end of the war. 

Greenfield furnished four hundred and forty-nine men for the 
war, which was a surplus of thirty-six over and above all 
demands. Twenty-seven were commissioned officers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty- 
one thousand six hundred and seventy-nine dollars and forty- 
two cents ($21,679.42). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the years of the war for State aid to soldiers' families, 
and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $574.94; in 1862, $3,143.43; in 1863, 
$5,112.83; in 1864, $5,159.33; in 1865, $2,600.00. Total 
amount, $16,590.53. 

The ladies of Greenfield were untiring in their labors in be- 
half of the soldiers, from the beginning to the end of the war ; 
and sent forward to the front great quantities of under-cloth- 
ing and articles for the hospitals, to the value of several thou- 
sand dollars. They held working meetings at least once a week, 
and much was done also in their families during the interval. 

Hawley. — Incorporated Feb. 7, 1792. Population in 1860, 
671; in 1865, 687. Valuation in 1860, $225,580; in 1865, 
$182,638. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William O. Bassett, Charles 
Crittenden, Elijah Field; in 1862, William O. Bassett, A. G. 
Ayers, F. H'. Sears ; in 1863, Clark Sears, Edwin Scott, 
Willis Vincent ; in 1864, Edwin Scott, Charles Baker, Elijah 
Field. In 1865, Charles Baker, W. E. Mansfield, Elijah 
Field. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was 
D. M. Baker. 

1861. November 5th, Voted, to abate all the town taxes 
assessed upon volunteers belonging to the town who have 
entered the military service. 

1862. August 29th, Three hundred dollars were appropri- 
ated for State aid to soldiers' families. October 15th, Voted, to 



HEATH. 269 

pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting 
under the last calls of the President, and credited to the quota 
of the town. 

1863. March 2d, Appropriated five hundred dollars for 
State aid to families of volunteers, and on the 3d of November 
ten hundred and fifty-nine dollars and seventy-eight cents " for 
the benefit of volunteers." 

1864. March 7th, Voted, to raise one thousand dollars for 
State aid to soldiers* families. April 25th, ''Voted, to raise a 
sufficient sum to fill all quotas up to the present time, not to 
exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each man." A 
similar vote was passed on the 27th of June. 

1865. March 6th, The same amount of bounty was voted 
to be paid to volunteers to the end of the year. 

Hawley furnished eighty-one men for the war, which was a 
surplus of eight over and above all demands. One was a com- 
missioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was eight thousand two hundred and thirty dollars 
($8,230.00). In addition to this, eight thousand nine hundred 
and forty-five dollars ($8,945.00) were raised for recruiting 
purposes by private subscription. Total, $17,175.00. 

The amount of money raised and paid during the years of 
the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was after- 
wards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, 
00 ; in 1862, $534.17 ; in 1863, $1,112.00 ; in 1864, $796.46 ; 
in 1865, $400.00. Total amount, $2,842.63. 

The ladies of Hawley contributed five hundred and twenty- 
five dollars in clothing and other articles of comfort for the sol- 
diers, which were forwarded by them to the front. 

Heath. — Incorporated Feb. 14, 1785. Population in 
1860, 661; in 1865, 642. Valuation in 1860, $255,580; 
in 1865, $232,551. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Arad Hall, John Henry, Joseph 
Bobbins ; in 1862, David Temple, Horace McGee, D. M. 
Sprague ; in 1863, David Temple, Cyrus Temple, John Read ; 
in 1864, E. P. Thompson, John Henry, Henry L. War- 



270 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

field; m 1865, Arad Hall, E. P. Thompson, William S. 
Gleason. 

The town-clerk during all of these years was Aaron Dick- 
enson. The town-treasurer during the same period was Arad 
Hall. 

1861. No action was taken by the town in relation to the 
war during this year. 

18G2. On the 22d of July a town-meeting was held, at 
which it was voted to pay each volunteer who should enlist in 
the military service, and be mustered in and credited to the 
quota of the town, a bounty of fifty dollars. September 3d, 
Six hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State 
aid to the families of volunteers. 

1863. January 20th, " Voted, to raise two hundred dollars 
for two men who have been drafted, to complete the town's quota 
on the then last call of the President for men." March — , Six 
hundred dollars were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' 
families. 

1864. March — , Six hundred dollars were voted for State 
aid to soldiers' families. June 13th, Voted, to raise one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars for each drafted man, whether he 
went into the military service himself or obtained a substitute. 
December 26th, Seven hundred and fifty dollars were appro- 
priated "to procure volunteers in anticipation of another call 
from the President." 

1865. March — , Six hundred dollars were appropriated for 
State aid. On the 15th of August a meeting was held, at which 
it was voted to refund to each individual who had paid commu- 
tation when drafted one hundred and fifty dollars, and to each 
one who had furnished a substitute three hundred dollars. This 
vote was carried by only one majority, and the meeting was 
adjourned for one week, at which the vote was reconsidered ; 
and nothing has been paid by the town to this class of persons. 

Heath furnished sixty-eight men for the war, which was a 
surplus of four over and above all demands. None were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was five thousand six hundred and twenty-five dollars 
($5,625.00). 



LEVERETT. 271 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers, and 
which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as fol- 
lows : In 1861, 00; in 1862, $276.00: in 1863, $723.76; in 

1864, $565.00 ; in 1865, $550.00. Total amount, $2,114.76, 

Leverett. — Incorporated May 5, 1774. Population in 
1860, 960; in 1865, '914. Valuation in 1860, $292,830; in 

1865, $284,644. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Asa L. Field, Luther Dud- 
ley, Timothy Putnam ; in 1862, Silas Ball, Elihu Hemenway, 
Luther Dudley; in 1863, Timothy B. Pierce, Alden C. Field, 
William H. Smith ; in 1864, Timothy B. Pierce, Frederick 
W. Field, Charles Lawton ; in 1865, Alden C. Field, Luther 
Dudley, Frederick W. Field. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Elisha M. Ingram ; 
in 1863, Levi M. Graves; in 1864 and 1865, Charles H. 
Field. The treasurer of the town during all these years was 
Elijah Ingram. 

1861. The first meeting, to consider matters in regard to 
the war, was held on the 13th of May, at which it was voted 
to pay "each volunteer a dollar a day, for one month, pre- 
vious to going into camp." October 14th, Voted, to raise 
money "to aid the wives and children of volunteers," in accord- 
ance with the act of the Legislature. 

1862. July 25th, Voted, to raise eight hundred dollars to 
pay bounties to eight volunteers for three years' military ser- 
vice, who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town, under the 
late call of the President for more men. September 22d, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volun- 
teer who shall enlist for nine months' service, and be credited 
to the quota of the town. Eleven men were required. De- 
cember 17th, Voted, "to procure two volunteers, at one hun- 
dred dollars each, to prevent a draft, or if two men are drafted 
to pay them the same." 

18()3. September 28th, Voted, to raise thirteen hundred 
and sixty-seven dollars to pay bounties to volunteers to fill the 
quota of the town. 



272 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

T 

1864. June 11th, Voted, to pay "one hundred dollars 
each to four men who have recently enlisted, and one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each person who shall enlist to the 
credit of the town before the 1st of March, 1865." 

Leverett furnished ninety-eight men for the war, which was 
a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. There were 
no commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was eight thousand three hundred and 
twenty-four dollars and sixty-one cents ($8,324.61). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
for State aid to the families of volunteers, and which was 
afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $121.07; in 1862, $1,091.78; in 1863, $1,741.88; 
in 1864, $1,809.08; in 1865, $850.00. Total amount, 
$5,613.81. 

The ladies of Leverett formed in 1861 a Soldiers' Aid So- 
cietv, which was continued durinoc the war. The total value 
of the articles made and furnished by them for the soldiers was 
two hundred and twenty dollars and fifty-one cents. 

Leyden. — Incorporated Feb. 22, 1809. Population in 
1860, 606 ; in 1865, 592. Valuation in 1860, $273,648 ; in 
1865, $278,647. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were David Morey, 
Oliver Chapin, Russell Richmond; in 1864, Henry Sheldon, 
Edward Denison, Zadock King; in 1865, Henry Sheldon, 
Zadock King, A. J. Denison. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was 
E. Wing Parker. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held September 24th, at which David 
Morey presented the following preamble and resolutions : — 

Whereas^ certain young men of our towi^ have come forward 
promptly at the call of their country, and ofiered their services for 
the defence of its institutions and honor; and as the circumstances 
under which they have so offered themselves plainly show them to be 
actuated by motives of the loftiest patriotism, every one of whom has 



LEYDEN. 273 

left behind a comfortable home and fond parents, brothers, and sisters, 
for the hardships, privations, and dangers of the camp and battle-field, 
therefore — 

Resolved^ That each volunteer who has, or may, enlist from this 
town into the volunteer service of the United States, be allowed twenty 
dollars ; and we beg them to be assured that it is accompanied with 
our most fervent prayer to Him ** who ordereih all things well," for 
their safe return to us. 

Doubts having been expressed as to the authority of the 
town to appropriate money for such a purpose, it was voted to 
take legal advice on the question before taking positive action 
upon the proposition. Subsequently, Judge David Aitken gave 
a written opinion that the town had no authority to make such 
an appropriation ; and the subject was indefinitely postponed. 

1862. July 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer enlisting for three years to the credit 
of the town, and seven hundred dollars were appropriated for 
this purpose. The same bounty was paid to men enlisting 
for nine months' service, which was raised by private subscrip- 
tion. September 13th, The selectmen were authorized to bor- 
row fifteen hundred dollars to pay bounties. 

1863. Under the call of the President, in the summer of 
this year, for three hundred thousand more volunteers, the 
quota of Leyden was filled by draft. The number required 
was seven, and that number was drafted : four of whom paid 
commutation, and two procured substitutes, and one went to 
the war. 

1864. Several meetings were held during this year, at 
which money was appropriated to pay bounties, to facilitate 
recruiting, and give State aid to the families of soldiers. 

Leyden furnished sixty-nine men for the war, which was a 
surplus of six over and above all demands. One was a com- 
missioned officer. The total amount appropriated and expended 
by the town for military purposes, exclusive of State aid, was 
three thousand four hundred and seventy-one dollars and 
seventy-five cents ($3,471.75). In addition to this amount, 
15,340.00 was raised by private subscription by the inhabitants 

of the town for the payment of bounties. 

18 



274 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
for State aid to soldiers' families during the years of the war, 
and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $216.42 ; in 1863, $548. 
56; in 1864, $561.67; in 1865, $212.19. Total amount, 
$1,538.74. 

The ladies of Leyden raised by their individual efforts three 
hundrcil dollars for sanitary purposes in behalf of the sol- 
diers, 

MoxHOE. — Incorporated Feb. 21, 1822. Population in 
1860, 236; in 1865, 191. Valuation in 1860, $63,074; in 
1865, $79,375. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Joseph H. Ilicks, David Ballou, 
Martin Kingsley ; in 1862, Joseph H. Hicks, Henry Hinsdale, 
Miranda llines ; in 18(53, Joseph H. Hicks, Albert A. Ilicks, 
Kussoll Stafford; in 1864, Jeremiah Giffard, David Goodsell, 
Alvin Tower; in 1865, Miranda Hines, Henry A. Legates, 
Allvrt A. Hicks. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861 was George H. 
HaUou; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Henry Hinsdale, 

1861, Xo action appears to have been taken by the town in 
n^ganl to the war during this year. 

1862. Julv 24th, It was voted "that we will raise two 
luuulriHl dollars in aid of those who may enlist in the service of 
the Tniteil States from this town; that we will authorize our 
*oUvtmcn to offer one hundred dollars bounty to each man to 
the number of this town's quota." The selectmen were also 
uuthiu'izcil to borrow the money " upon the issue of town 
;^'ripl.** 

Iv^lM, March 2d, "Voted, to pay Miranda Hines one thou- 
$auvl luul oii;hty-nine dollars and fifty-one cents, it being for 
mo^K\\ turnisluHl by him to pay bounty to soldiers and aid to 
'jVu' f^milios.*' October 5th, "Voted, to raise two hundred and 
x*vw^y««»i\ dollars and five cents, to pay bounty tax." 

'^S^^4* April 21st, "Voted, to raise one hundred and twenty- 
i^c isvU;** apiiHV for each of three soldiers procured at Boston, 
>i:i«v«) J^% 1864, by Mr. Hines, and also one hundred and 



MONTAGUE. 275 

twenty-five dollars to be refunded to John E. Taylor,* in all 
five hundred dollars." 

1865. January 31st, The selectmen were authorized to 
enlist men to fill the quota of the town, ** when it is ascertained 
what the quota of the town is, and they are to be one-year men." 
May 29th, " Voted, to raise money sufficient to pay the money 
borrowed for recruiting, the interest on the same, and other 
expenses of recruiting, twelve hundred and sixty-two dollars 
and fifty-seven cents." Voted, "to pay James H. Sheldon 
three hundred dollars to reimburse him in part for money paid 
for a substitute." 

Monroe furnished about twenty men for the war, or the 
exact number required of it to fill its contingent on every call 
for men made by the President during the Rebellion. None 
were commissioned officers. The amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was three thousand six hundred and twenty-eight 
dollars and thirteen cents ($3,628.13). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 
years of the war, and afterwards repaid by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $56.00; in 
1863, $228.00; in 1864, $72.00; in 1865, $51.00. Total 
amount, $407.00. 

The ladies of Monroe "furnished various articles for the 
soldiers, amounting in value to perhaps forty dollars." 

Montague. — Incorporated Dec. 22, 1753. Population in 
1860, 1,593 ; in 1865, 1,575. Valuation in 1860, $564,033 ; 
in 1865, $606,737. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were R. M. Oak- 
man, Richard Clapp, E. F. Gunn ; in 1864, Richard Clapp, 
W. W. Thayer, Seymour Rockwell; in 1865, Richard Clapp, 
R. N. Oakman, Benjamin Fay. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was C. P. Wright. 

* John £. Taylor was a drafted man who had paid commutation. 



276 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1861. At the annual meeting before any call had been made 
for troops by the President, held on the 11th of March, it was 
voted '* that all soldiers that enlist and are accepted be paid one 
dollar a day for time spent in drilling for one month from time 
of enlistment. November 5th, The selectmen were authorized 
to borrow, not exceeding four hundred dollars, to aid the fam- 
ilies of volunteers. 

1862. March 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
one thousand dollars for aid to families of volunteers, *^ and to 
expend it as in their judgment circumstances may require." 
July 24th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to 
each of the seventeen volunteers who shall enlist for three years' 
service, to fill the quota of the town. September 5th, Voted, 
to pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months' service.* 

1863. March 2d, Voted, to raise four thousand dollars to 
pay State aid to families of soldiers. 

1864. Voted, to raise twelve hundred and fifty dollars to fill 
the quota of the town. May 24th, Voted, to pay a bounty of 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars to men who were drafted 
and accepted in 1863. June 4th, Voted, to raise three thou- 
sand dollars to pay bounties of one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars to each of twenty-four volunteers to fill the quota of the 
town. 

1865. January 10th, The same bounty was voted to be paid 
during the year. 

Montague furnished one hundred and seventy-three men for 
the war, which was a surplus of sixteen over and above all de- 
mands. Five were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was seven thousand nine 
hundred and seventy dollars ($7,970.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 
years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $171.87; in 1862, 

* Individual citizens signed an obligation to indemnify the selectmen and 
treasurer for borrowing the money required by the two last votes, in case the 
action of the town should not be legalized. 



NEW SALEM. 277 

$2,040.00 ; in 1863, $3,823.26 ; in 1864, $2,049.75 ; in 1865, 
$879.40. Total amount, $8,964.28. 

The ladies of Montague raised by fairs, festivals, and contri- 
butions, about fifteen hundred dollars for the aid of the soldiers, 
which was sent to the Sanitary Commission in money, articles 
of clothing, &c. 

New Salem. — Incorporated June 15, 1753. Population in 
1860, 957 ; in 1865, 1,115. Valuation in 1860, $347,945 ; in 
1865, $336,476. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Elijah F. Porter, William 
Whittimore, Varaum V. Vaughan ; in 1862, Elijah F. Porter, 
Samuel Adams, Varnum V. Vaughan ; in 1863, Elijah F. Por- 
ter, Samuel Adams, Sylvanus Sibley ; in 1864, Elijah F. 
Porter, Samuel Adams, Daniel V. Putnam ; in 1865, Elijah F. 
Porter, Daniel V. Putnam, William S. Freeman. 

The town-clerk during all these years was Royal Whittaker ; 
the town-treasurer during the same period was Nelson Haskins. 

1861. November 5th, Voted, to raise one thousand dollars 
for aid to the families of soldiers. 

1862. April 7th, Voted, to raise fourteen hundred dollars 
for the same purpose. August 9th, Thirteen hundred dollars 
were voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each 
volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town. September 2d, 
Voted, to borrow two thousand dollars for the same purpose. 
November 4th, Voted, to raise fifteen hundred dollars for aid 
to the families of soldiers. December 4th, Voted, to raise five 
hundred dollars to pay bounties to volunteers. 

1863. April 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
four thousand dollars, ^*if needed," to furnish aid to the fami- 
lies of volunteers and drafted men. 

1864. March 26th, The town raised the bounty to volun- 
teers to one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and authorized 
the treasurer to borrow money to pay the same. April 4th, 
Voted, to appropriate three thousand dollars to aid the fami- 
lies of soldiers ; also, to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to soldiers who have enlisted, or may enlist, 
to fill the quota of the town. April 20th, Fifteen hundred 



278 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

dollars were voted to pay bounties. June 25th, Voted, to pay 
a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer who may enlist, in anticipation of any call for men by the 
President, " on condition that individuals will subscribe a suffi- 
cient sum to pay the balance." August 9th, Voted, to raise 
two thousand one hundred and twenty-five dollars to pay boun- 
ties to enlisted men. 

1805. January 2d, Voted, to raise six hundred and twenty- 
five dollars to pay bounties to five enlisted men ; also, twenty- 
five hundred dollars for aid to soldiers' families. June 24th, 
Voted, to raise four thousand dollars to repay money advanced 
by sixty-seven citizens for recruiting and bounty purposes, "one- 
half to be assessed the present year, and one-half the next." 

New Stilem furnished about one hundred and six men for the 
war, which was a surplus of seven over and above all demands. 
Five were commissioned officers. The total amount of money 
expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was six thousand one hundred and twenty-five dol- 
lars ($6,125.00). This does not include $4,650.00 that was 
raised by private subscription; which, when added, makes the 
total expenditure, $10,775.00. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
for State aid to the families of soldiers during the years of the 
war, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as fol- 
lows : In 1861, $389.01>; in 1862, $2,497.40; in 1863, 
$2,744.37; in 1864, $2,150.00; in 1865, $1,375.45. Total 
amount, $9,156.31. 

NoRTHFiELD. — Incorporated Feb. 22, 1713. Population 
in 1860, 1,712; in 1865, 1,660. Valuation in 1860, $708,- 
226; in 1865, $712,054. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Samuel Lane, Horace Hoi ton, 
E. G. Cole; in 1862, Samuel Lane, H. F. Field, W. L. Fay; 
in 1863, Samuel Lane, L. T. Webster; in 1864, Samuel Lane, 
L. T. Webster, H. W. Montague, S. W. Button ; * in 1865, 
L. T. Webster, H. W. Montague, Edwin Alexander. 

* Elected to fill a yacancy occasioned bj the death of Mr. Lane. 



KORTHFIELD. 279 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years 
of the war was Samuel W. Dutton. 

1861. A town-meeting was held May 15th, at which it 
was resolved, Ist, To cordially unite >vith all good citizens of the 
State and country to defend the flag and uphold free govern- 
ment ; 2d, To authorize the selectmen to borrow two thousand 
dollars to aid every citizen enlisting as a volunteer, and to sup- 
port their families. November 5th, Voted, to amend the vote 
passed at the meeting in May in regard to support of the fami- 
lies of volunteers so as to conform to the law passed by the 
Legislature. 

1862. July 26th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dolLirs to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town ; and 
the selectmen were authorized to borrow seventeen hundred dol- 
lars. August 23d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
a sum, not exceeding twenty-five hundred dollars ; and to pay 
a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine 
months, and ten dollars additional to be paid upon enlistment, 
and the balance when mustered in. September 20th, The 
selectmen were empowered to borrow more money, and to peti- 
tion the Legislature to legalize the votes of the town for raising 
money for paying bounties. 

1863. April 6th, Voted, to raise one thousand dollars to 
repay borrowed money, and that the same amount be assessed 
each year until the debt is paid. June 27th, The selectmen 
were authorized to borrow such sums as may be necessary to 
pay bounties to volunteers, and aid to their families. Novem- 
ber 3d, The selectmen were directed to pay the same aid to the 
families of drafted men as is paid to the families of volunteers. 

1864. April 14th, The assessors were directed to assess a 
tax sufRcient to reimburse the money which had been advanced 
by citizens for war purposes, said payments to be due on and 
after Jan. 5, 1865 ; and a committee of three was chosen to 
audit all of these claims. July 30th, The selectmen were au- 
thorized to deposit one thousand dollars with the State Treas- 
urer, to pay bounties for men recruited by the State and credited 
to the town. Four recruits were obtained from the State, and 
five hundred dollars were returned to the town. 



280 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1865. Several meetings were held this year, but nothing of 
general interest was done. 

Northfield furnished about one hundred and seventy-five men 
for the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all 
demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money raised and expended by the town for war 
purposes, exclusive of State aid, was nineteen thousand one 
hundred and seventy-three dollars and thirty-four cents ($19,- 
173.34). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 
years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $236.29; in 1862, 
$1,870.18; in 1863, $2,552.95; in 1864, $1,900.00; in 
1865, $1,350.00. Total amount, $7,909.42. 

The ladies of the town organized a Soldiers' Aid Society, 
which met once a fortnight during the war. The articles and 
money contributed by them were forwarded to the front through 
the agents of the Sanitary and Christian Commissions. 

Orange. — Incorporated Feb. 24, 1810. Population in 
1860, 1,622; in 1865, 1,909. Valuation in 1860, $543,346; 
in 1865, $599,243. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were Admiral A. 
Ward, Darwin Merriam, Davis Goddard ; in 1864, Davis 
Goddard, Darwin Merriam, H. N. Moore ; in 1865, A. J. 
Clark, J. D. Flagg, Thomas E. Bridge. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was John W. 
Wheeler. The town-treasurer during the same period was 
W. S. Ballou. 

1861. May 6th, Voted, to raise five thousand dollars "to 
arm and equip a company of volunteers, and to support their 
families." One dollar a day was allowed each man for drilling 
for thirty days under a drill-master, and ten dollars a month 
while in active service, in addition to the Government pay. 
Davis Goddard, H. Baker, Rodney Hunt, Levi Kilburn, and 
Admiral A. Ward, were appointed a committee to carry the 
vote of the town into effect, and to see that the families of the 



ORANGE. 281 

volunteers were properly cared for. The following resolution 
was adopted : — 

Resolved^ That, in the present crisis of our national affairs (ignor- 
ing all political party divisions), it is the duty of all good citizens to 
come boldly forward and vindicate before the world the justice of our 
cause, and show our patriotism to the Union and its free institutions by 
contributing liberally from the means we possess in aid of a common 
cause. 

November 5th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow five 
thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to soldiers' fami- 
lies, as provided by law. 

1862. July 26th, The selectmen were directed to canvass 
the town for volunteers, and to pay each volunteer for three 
years' service a bounty of one hundred dollars, and fifty dollars 
to each volunteer for nine months' service, when mustered in 
and credited to the quota of the town. On the 23d of August 
the bounty to nine-months volunteers was increased to one 
hundred dollars. The town voted to " indemnify the selectmen 
for money borrowed and expended by them in the payment of 
bounties." 

1863. September 26th, The town-treasurer was authorized 
•* to forward to the State treasurer a receipt for the amount of 
reimbursement bounty tax, and that the tax be assessed upon 
the inhabitants." 

1864. April 16th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated 
to enable the selectmen to enlist volunteers to fill the quota of 
the town, and seven hundred and one dollars for bounty money 
advanced by them. June 25th, Four thousand dollars were ap- 
propriated to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town in 
anticipation of any call of the President for more men. Novem- 
ber 8th, The town bounty was fixed at one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars, and so continued until the end of the war.* 

1865. July 15th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money "to reimburse various individuals who have advanced 
money to procure volunteers." 

* Each volunteer waa furnished by citizens with from two to twenty-five 
dollara for immediate use, in addition to his bounty before leaving for tlie front. 



282 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Orange furnished two hundred and nine men for the war, 
which was a surphis of ten over and above all demands. Three 
were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclui«ive of State aid, was twenty-five thousand one hundred 
and thirty-five dollars ($25,135.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers 
during the years of the war, and which was repaid by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $110. (52; in 18G2, 
$1,535.66 ; in 1863, $3,091.58 ; in 1864, $3,190.90 ; in 18«>5, 
$2,027.17. Total amount, $9,955.93. 

The ladies of Orange and North Orange Village were inde- 
fatigable in their work for the soldiers, and forwarded to the 
Sanitary and Christian Commissions articles of comfort and use 
to the money value of at least two thousand dollars. 

RowE. — Incorporated Feb. 9, 1785. Population in 1860, 
619; in 1865, 563. Valuation in 1860, $223,313; in 1865, 
$180,425. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William II. Sanford, Charles 
Demons, John Ballou ; in 1862, William H. Sanford, S. P. 
Everett, E. II. Stanford; in 1863, Elias Keith, John Ballou, 
V. M. Porter ; in 1864, Elias Keith, Lyman Sears, Lorenzo S. 
Blakslee; in 1865, Elias Keith, Lorenzo S. Blakslee, Charles 
Demons. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was 
Humphrey Gould ; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, James M. Ford. 

1861. No legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating 
to the war, appears to have been held during this year. 

1862. April 7th, The town-treasurer was authorized to 
borrow, not exceeding four hundred dollars, to be expended 
under the direction of the selectmen for State aid to the families 
of volunteers living in Rowe, as provided by law. August 23d, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of the 
volunteers for three years' service, belonging to Howe, who have 
already enlisted ; and the same amount to those who shall here- 
after enlist for nine months' service, to the number of thirteen. 



8HELBURXE. 283 

to fill the quota of the town. November 4th, The treasurer was 
authorized to borrow two hundred and forty dollars for the pay- 
ment of State aid to soldiers' families. 

1863. March 2d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, 
not exceeding five hundred and sixty dollars, for the payment of 
State aid ; and on the 3d of November he was authorized to 
borrow "suflScient to supply any deficiency during the year." 

1864. March 7th and March 30th, The treasurer was 
authorized to borrow money for State aid to soldiers' families. 
June 2 2d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars to each volunteer for three years' service, in antici- 
pation of another call of the President for more men ; and the 
treasurer was autliorized to borrow one thousand dollars to pay 
the same. 

1865. May 20th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
whatever amount of money was necessary for the payment of 
State aid to the families of soldiers during the year. 

Rowe furnished sixty-five men for the war, which was a sur- 
plus of three over and above all demands. None were commis- 
sioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and 
expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was four thousand three hundred and sixty-seven dollars 
($4,367.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 
years of the war, and which was afterwards reimbursed by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, 
$452.96; in 1863, $651.20; in 1864, $834.73; in 1865, 
$800.00. Total amount, $2,738.89. 

The ladies of Rowe early in the war formed a Soldiers' Aid 
Society, which " contributed to the United-States army through 
the Sanitary Commission largely, in proportion to their means 
and numbers." 

Shelburne. — Incorporated June 21, 1768. Population in 
1860, 1,448 ; in 1865, 1,563. Valuation in 1860, $682,660 ; 
in 1865, $822,620. 

The selectmen in 1861 were E. M. Whitney, Pliny Fisk, 



284 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Ira W. Barnard; in 1862 and 1863, Pliny Fisk, R. B. Bard- 
well, Ira W. Barnard; in 1864, Pliny Fisk, R. B. Bardwell, 
John A. Andrews; in 1865, Pliny Fisk, R. B. Bardwell, 
Amasa Bardwell. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of the years of 
the war was C. M. Duncan. 

1861. The first meeting, to act upon matters relating to the 
war, was held on the 19th of April, at which it was voted to 
appropriate five hundred dollars to buy uniforms for Company 
H, Tenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. July 3d, 
One thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to the families 
of volunteers. November 5th, Four hundred and ninety-eight 
dollars and fifty cents were voted " to reimburse subscriptions 
made by individuals for the volunteers of Company H, Tenth 
Regiment." 

1862. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this 
year. 

1863. November 3d, Voted, "that a committee of twelve 
be raised to circulate a subscription paper among the tax-payers, 
each signer pledging himself to pay his proportion of such a 
sum as may be paid to secure twenty volunteers for the United- 
States service." November 23d, "Voted, to raise fifteen hun- 
dred dollars by subscription to procure volunteers, said sums 
to be equally apportioned on the subscribers according to their 
polls and estates." 

1864. February 20th, A committee of three was appointed 
to act with the selectmen to procure volunteers to fill the quota 
of the town " under the last call of the President." Two thou- 
sand dollars were appropriated for the payment of bounties. 
April 16th, Thirty-seven hundred dollars and fifty cents were 
appropriated to defray the expenses of filling the last quota, 
and fifteen hundred dollars "to refund subscriptions." The 
selectmen were authorized to continue recruiting until March, 
1865 ; to pay to each volunteer a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars, and to borrow money for that purpose. 
May 31st, "Voted, that the selectmen procure thirty volun- 
teers immediately, and send them into the service as soon as 
may be ; " also, to borrow five thousand dollars. 






8HUTE8BURT. 285 

Shelburne furuished one hundred and eighty men for the war, 
which was a surplus of twenty-two over and above all demands. 
Ten were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was twenty-seven thousand five hundred 
and eighty dollars and twenty-three cents ($27,580.23). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $314.17 ; in 1862, 
$1,429.68; in 1863, $2,415.67; in 1864, $2,516.99; in 
1865, $1,600.00. Total amount, $8,276.51. 

Shutesbuuy. — Incorporated June 30, 1761. Population 
in 1860, 798; in 1865, 788. Valuation in 1860, $221,007; 
in 1865, $219,250. 

The selectmen in 1861 were John H. Davis, Samuel F. 
Dudley, Samuel H. Stowell ; in 1862, Samuel H. Stowell, 
William H. Beaman, Samuel F. Dudley; in 1863, Benjamin 
Winter, Joseph A. Haskins, Elisha P. Spear ; in 1864, John 
H. Davis, Samuel H. Stowell, Silas W. Adams ; in 1865, 
John H. Davis, Benjamin Winter, Samuel F. Dudley. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Joseph A. 
Haskins; in 1864 and 1865, Samuel H. Stowell. The town- 
treasurer during all of these years was J. G. Reed. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
connected with the war, was held on the 20th of May, at which 
the selectmen were authorized to borrow money " for the sup- 
port of any of the families of our citizens who are mustered 
into military service who need assistance." 

1862. April 7th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow, 
not exceeding three hundred dollars, for State aid to soldiers' 
families. July 22d, A committee of two was chosen to aid 
the selectmen in recruiting volunteers, and to pay a bounty 
of one hundred dollars to each volunteer (to the number of 
seven) who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the 
quota of the town, and to borrow money to pay the same. 
October 4th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to vol- 
unteers for nine months' service. 



286 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1863. January 19th, Voted, to accept the doings of the 
selectmen in procuring substitutes for drafted men. April 6th, 
The selectmen were authorized to borrow, not exceeding two 
thousand dollars, for State aid to soldiers' families during the 
year. July 4th, Voted, to pay the treasurer of the Common- 
wealth the proportion of the town for bounties paid to volun- 
teers, agreeably to section 9th of the 218th chapter of the Acts 
of 1863. 

1864. May 23d, Voted, to pay one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars to each of the four drafted men, if they are accepted 
and mustered in, or procure substitutes ; and the same amount 
to all others, under similar circumstances, until March 1, 1865. 
June 11th, Euclid Owen and S. H. Stowell were appointed 
recruiting agents of the town, and three thousand dollars were 
appropriated for recruiting expenses and the payment of boun- 
ties. August 30th, Six thousand one hundred and fifteen dol- 
lars were appropriated to refund money voluntarily advanced 
by individuals to aid recrpiting, and to pay the amount ex- 
pended by the town.* 

Shutesbury furnished seventy-three men for the war, which 
was a surplus of five over and above all demands. None were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was six thousand one hundred and sixty- three dol- 
lars ($6,163.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended . by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers during 
the years of the war, and which was afterwards refunded by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $29.42 ; in 1862, 
$646.85; in 1863, $1,297.44; in 1864, $1,647.20; in 1865, 
$800.00. Total amount, $4,420.91. 

Sunderland. — Incorporated Nov. 12, 1714. Population 
in 1860, 839; in 1865. 861. Valuation in 1860, $345,843; 
in 1865, $413,827. 



* The amount paid by individuals and reimbursed by the town was eighteen 
hundred and ninety-two dollars. 



SUNDERLAND. 287 

The selectmen in 1861 were D. Dwight Whitmore, John 
R. Smith, Albert Montague ; in 18G2, Albert Montague, Elihu 
Smith, Wallace R. Warner ; in 1863, Albert Montague, Elihu 
Smith, George L. Batchelder ; in 1864, Albert Montague, 
Erastus Pomroy, Stoughton D. Crocker; in 1865, Albert 
Montague, Henry J. Graves, Mirick Montague. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was II. W. 
Taft. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was William 
Hunt; and in 1863, 1864, and 1865, John M. Smith. 

1861. May — , Voted, "to chose a committee to disburse 
such sums of money as shall in their judgment be necessary for 
an outfit to any persons, residents of the town, who may enlist 
for the support and defence of the Union, and for the comfort 
and support of their families during their terms of service." 

1862. August 18th, "Voted, to pay all those who have and 
shall hereafter enlist under the calls of the President one hun- 
dred dollars each, to be paid upon their being mustered into 
service." December — , Voted, "to enter into an arrangement 
with other towns in this vicinity to establish an agency for the 
purpose of communicating with the soldiers, and collecting and 
forwarding supplies for their health and comfort." ^loney was 
raised for this purpose. Another meeting was held during the 
year, at which the town voted to pay bounties to men who had 
enlisted for nine months' service, and were credited to the quota 
of the town, although they were in excess of the number of 
volunteers required of the town. 

Several other meetings were held during the years 1864 and 

1865, to consider matters connected with recruiting and the 
payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. 

Sunderland, according to a return made by the selectmen in 

1866, furnished fifty-nine men for the war. The real number, 
however, must have been about eighty-five, as it filled its quota 
upon every call made by the President, and at the end of the 
war had a surplus of eight over and above all demands. Two 
were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was twelve thousand four hundred and 
ninety dollars and fifty-two cents ($12,490.52). 



288 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to the families of soldiers durin<x the vears of the 
war, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows : In 1861, $23.92 ; in 1862, $624.40 ; in 1863, 
$1,486.80; in 1864, $840.44; in 1865, $543.56. Total 
amount, $3,519.12. 

Warwick. — Incorporated Feb. 17, 1763. Population in 
1860, 932; in 1865, 909. Valuation in 1860, $342,556; in 
1865, $220,657. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were William H. Bass, 
Sylvanus N. Atwood, Charles R. Gale; in 1863, Charles R. 
Gale, Ilervey Barber, Eben G. Ball ; in 1864, Hervey Barber, 
Eben G. Ball, Jesse F. Bridge; in 1865, E. F. Mnyo, J. F. 
Bridge, William II. Gale. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was E. F. 
Mayo. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was 
Benjamin G. Putnam ; in 1864 and 1865, Philip Young. 

1861. There docs not appear to have been any action taken 
by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war 
durinii: this year. 

1862. A town-meeting was held on the 25th of August, at 
which it was voted to authorize the selectmen to borrow money 
and to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each person who 
shall volunteer jind be accepted to fill the quota of the town on 
the last call of the President for three hundred thousand men. 

1863. At a meeting held on the 12th of December, it was 
voted " to authorize the selectmen to procure volunteers for the 
United-States service." 

1864. On the 6th of April the town voted ''to raise fifteen 
hundred dollars to be assessed, or as much of the same as the 
selectmen shall deem necessary, to be expended in the payment 
of bounties to soldiers who have or shall volunteer in the town's 
quota ; " also, " to authorize the selectmen to cause the quota 
of the town to be filled with volunteers in advance of anv draft." 
" The town at several meetings voted to pay the highest bounties 
allowed by the laws of the State." 

Mr. Mayo, the town-clerk, writes: "The men who went 



WENDELL. 289 

from our town were among our best citizens, and those who 
returned to us fully occupy their former stations. We have 
lost in the war twenty-six men. Alexander Cooper, sergeant 
of Company G, Thirty-sixth Regiment Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, was more than three years in the army, and was dis- 
charged for wounds received at Spottsylvania. He was instantly 
killed Nov. 22, 1866, by the fall of a derrick while raising a 
stone for the soldiers' monument in this town." 

Warwick furnished ninety-nine men for the war, which was a 
surplus of nine over and above all demands. None were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was eight thousand seven hundred and eighty-six 
dollars and nine cents ($8,786.09). There were also raised by 
private subscription $2,638.21, which was not reimbursed by the 
town. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during the years of the war, and 
which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, $296.17; in 1862, $1,394.29; in 1863, 
$1,885.75; in 1864, $1,826.86; in 1865, $1,000.00. Total 
amount, $6,403.07. 

Wendell. — Incorporated May 8, 1781. Population in 
1860, 704; in 1865, 602. Valuation in 1860, $232,771 ; in 
1865, $201,657. 

The selectmen in 1861 were J. R. Reynolds, Joseph Fisk, 
Alonzo Fleming ; in 1862, Alonzo Fleming, Joseph Fisk, Adin 
Whitaker; in 1863, J. R. Reynolds, T. H. Bartlett, Clark 
Stone; in 1864, J. R. Reynolds, T. H. Bartlett, N. E. 
Sweetser, Alonzo Fleming, Dwight Gates; in 1865, Orin 
Andrews, Andrew Baker, Clark Stone. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was John Hunt ; in 1863, 
J. H. Dodge; in 1864 and 1865, H. F. Brooks. The town- 
treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was John Hunt; in 1863, J. H. 
Dodge; in 1864, Clark Stone; in 1865, George Fleming. 

1861. The town appropriated one thousand dollars for the 

payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. 

19 



290 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1862. Sometime during this year the town voted to pay a 
bounty of one liundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist 
in the military service and be credited to the quota of Wendell. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate capacity, in regard to the war during this year, 
although recruiting went on and the payment of State aid con- 
tinued. 

1864. On the 11th of March the town voted " to raise seven 
hundred and fifty dollars to procure volunteers ; " and on the 
20th of June voted, " to pay volunteers for three years' ser- 
vice, who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the town, 
a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars." This was 
continued until the end of the war. 

Wendell furnished sixty-two men for the war, which was a 
surplus of three over and above all demands. One was a com- 
missioned officer. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was four thousand two hundred and forty-seven dol- 
lars and six cents ($4,247.06). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to the soldiers* families during the years of the war, 
and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $185.43; in 1862, $462.00; in 
1863, $336.52; in 1864, $796.00; in 1865, $650.00. Total 
amount, $2,429.95. 

" The ladies of Wendell held weekly meetings during a part 
of the war, and worked for the soldiers." 

Whately. — Incorporated April 24, 1771. Population in 
1860, 1,057 ; in 1865, 1,012. Valuation in 1860, $624,902 ; 
in 1865, $665,972. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Samuel B. White, Hiram 
Smith, Rufus Graves; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Samuel B. 
White, Edwin Bardwell, Alonzo Crafts; in 1865, Samuel B. 
White, Edwin Bardwell, Elihu Belden. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Samuel 
Lesure. The town-treasurer in 1861 was James M. Crafts ; in 
1862, Stotham E. AUis; in 1863 and 1864, Ellis C. Allis ; in 
1865, Horace B. Fox. 



WHATELT. 291 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters in 
relation to the war, was held on the 8th of May, at which the 
following resolutions were adopted : — 

Besolved, That a committee of seven be appointed, who shall be 
authorized to borrow a sum of money in behalf of the town not ex- 
ceeding two thousand dollars, to be expended by them as they shall 
deem expedient, on such soldiers from this town (and their families) 
as shall be mustered into service during the continuance of the present 
war. 

Resolvedj That those who shall volunteer, and be mustered into the 
military service of the United States, shall be furnished with such an 
outfit as is necessary, and receive pay sufficient with what they receive 
from the Government to make twenty dollars a month ; and that the 
town will provide liherally for their families. 

The committee of seven were directed to pay each volunteer, 
after enlistment and before muster in, such compensation for 
his time spent in drilling as they should deem expedient. 

1862. July 23d, The selectmen were authorized to pay 
each volunteer who enlists for three years, and is mustered in 
to the credit of the town, a bounty of one hundred dollars, and 
to borrow money to pay the same. August 27th, The same 
bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers for nine months' 
service. 

1863. No action was taken by the town in regard to the 
war during this year. 

1864. March 7th, Voted, to raise forty-two hundred dol- 
lars " to pay those volunteers who have not received any bounty 
from individuals, and to reimburse individuals who have paid 
bounties for enlistments*" The selectmen were directed to bor- 
row money to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars to eacli volunteer who shall enlist for three years, and 
be credited to the town previous to March, 1865. A similar 
vote was passed on the 4th of June. 

Whately, according to a return made by the selectmen in 
1866,* furnished seventy-three men for the war, which cannot 
have been correct. The true number was doubtless about one 
hundred and ten, as Whately furnished its full quota on every 
call made by the President, and at the end of the war had a 



292 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

surplus of twelve over and above all demands. One was a 
commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was twelve thousand three hundred and eighty 
dollars ($12,380.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families during the 
years of the war, and which was afterwards repaid by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $37.06 ; in 1862, 
$766.39; in 1863, $1,770.56; in 1864, $1,007.54; in 1865, 
$500.00. Total amount, $4,081.55. 



CHAPTER VIII. 



HAMPDEN COUNTY. 



This county is bounded north by Hampshire County, east by 
Worcester County, south by Tolland and Hartford Counties, 
Connecticut, and west by the county of Berkshire. The Con- 
necticut Eiver passes from north to south through the centre of 
the county. Springfield, the shire town, is one of the most 
beautiful and enterprising cities in the Commonwealth. The 
Boston and Albany, and several other railroads, centre there. 
The United-States arsenal, for the manufacture of fire-arms, is 
located in Springfield. The " Springfield Daily Republican " 
has a national reputation for ability and enterprise. "Some 
parts of the county are mountainous, but the principal part of it 
is rather undulating than hilly." The occupations of the people 
are farming and manufacturing, and altogether it is one of the 
most thriving and intelligent counties in the Commonwealth. 

The population of the county in 1860 was 57,866, in 1865 
it was 64,438, which is an increase in five years of 6,572. 
The valuation of the county in 1860 was $28,252,663, In 1865 
it was $33,253,177, which was an increase of $5,000,514 in 
five years. In 1870 the population of the county was 78,409, 
which was an increase in five years of 13,971. The county 
contains twenty-one towns and one city. 

The number of men furnished by the county for the war, as 
returned by the city and town authorities in 1866, was 6,239, 
which was about the true number that it furnished. The 
aggregate amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
various municipalities in Hampden on account of the war, ex- 
clusive of State aid to the families of soldiers, was $630,031.89. 




294 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

To which add $34,851.51 of individual contributions, making 
the total $604,883.40. 

Tlie amount of money raised and expended for State aid to 
the families of soldiers during the years of the war, and which 
was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was $314,944.90, 
making the total amount $979,828.30. 

Tlie following is the war record of each city and town in the 
county : — 

AoAWAM. — Incorporated May 17, 1835. Population in 
1860, 1,()98 ; in 1865, 1,665. Valuation in 1860, $693,008 ; 
in 1865, $816,850. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Josiah Johnson, Charles Col- 
ton, Isaac Roberts ; in 1862, Charles Colton, Frederick John- 
son, Joseph Bedortha ; in 1863, Joseph Bedortha, John G. 
Freeland, Joseph L. Smith; in 1864, Joseph Bedortha, Joseph 
L. Smith, Grosvenor Marcy ; in 1865, Joseph Bedortlia, John 
G. Freeland, Elijah D. Allen. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during tlie years 1861, 
1862, 1863, and 1864, was Ashbell Sykes; in 1865, Charles 
C. Wright. 

1861. The selectmen having refused or neglected to call a 
town-meeting to act upon matters relating to the war, a meet- 
ing was called by Charles C. Wright, a justice of the peace, 
upon the petition of Hinsdale Smith, and twelve other legal 
voters of Agawam, on the 4th of May ; at which it was voted 
to appropriate five hundred dollars to furnish arms, equipments, 
and uniforms for volunteers in the military service of the county 
who may belong to that town. A committee was appointed 
to carry the vote into effect. August 3d, This committee re- 
ported that they had expended $153.01 for uniforms and for 
assistance to soldiers' families. The selectmen were directed 
"to pay the family of George M. Scott twelve dollars, and the 
family of E. P. Smith ten dollars, a month, from July 8, 1861, 
and while they remained in the service." 

1862. April 7th, Four hundred dollars were appropriated 
for aid to soldiers' families. April 21st, Two hundred dollars 
were added to this sum. August 1st, The selectmen were 



AGAWAM. 295 

instructed to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each 
inhabitant of the town, to the number of seventeen, who shall 
volunteer for three years' service, and be credited to the quota 
of the town ; and to borrow seventeen hundred dollars to pay 
the same. At a meeting held September 2d, eighty-four dol- 
lars and eighty cents were added to the amount appropriated on 
the Ist of August ; and a bounty of two hundred dollars was 
authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months' service. 

1863. September 21st, Voted, "to raise twenty-nine hun- 
dred and five dollars and eighty-four cents, in obedience to a 
law passed April 29, 1863, entitled an act 'for the reimburse- 
ment of bounties paid to volunteers.' " 

1864. April 4th, Five hundred dollars were appropriated for 
aid to soldiers' families. Two thousand two hundred and sixty 
dollars were raised for reimbursement of money paid by citizens 
to volunteers since Oct. 17, 1863. July 15th, The bounty to be 
paid volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dol- 
lars, and so remained until the end of the war. 

1865. April 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money to refund to individuals the amounts of money they had 
voluntarily contributed to aid recruiting, and to those who had 
furnished substitutes for the army. 

Agawam furnished one hundred and seventy-two men for 
the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all de- 
mands. Four were commissioned oflicers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was seventeen thousand and 
seventy-seven dollars and fifty-five cents ($17,077.55). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to the families of volunteers during the years of the 
war, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $228.10; in 1862, $1,197.46; in 
1863, $1,919.62; in 1864, $2,060.74 ; in 1865, $1,313.22. 
Total amount, $6,719.14. 

The ladies of Agawam formed a Soldiers' Relief Society in 
October, 1861. They met once a week during the war, and 
made lint, bandages, and under-clothing, which from time to 
time were sent to the front. The value of these contributions 



296 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

in money was between eight hundred and a thousand dollars. 
One lady volunteered, and served three months as a nurse in 
one of the hospitals near Washington. 

Blandford. — Incorporated April 10, 1741. Population in 
1860, 1,256 ; in 1865, 1,087. Valuation in 1860, $519,151 ; 
in 1865, $529,150. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Thomas S. Chaffee, Lyman R. 
Norton, David Bates ; in 1862, James C. Hinsdale, William 
M. Lewis, Alfred Peckham ; in 1863, Watson E. Boise, 
Francis Bates, Eli A. Cross ; in 1864, Samuel A. Bartholo- 
mew, William M. Lewis, H. D. Tinker; in 1865, William M. 
Lewis, Eli Osborne, George C. Collister. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 
1864, was Norman V. Lewis; in 1865, B. B. Norton. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters con- 
nected with the war, was held on the 13th of May ; at which 
D. P. Robinson, George C. Gibbs, and William E. Hinsdale 
were chosen to consider and report what action the town should 
take. This committee reported as follows : — 

Whereas the President of the United States has called for volun- 
teers to assist the regularly constituted authorities in maintaining and 
executing the laws against armed traitors who are seeking the over- 
throw of the Federal Grovernment, — 

JResolvedy That the citizens of Blandford,* in town-meeting assem- 
bled, do recognize the propriety and necessity of the action of the 
Pres'ident of the United States in calling out volunteers to maintain 
and execute the laws and put down treason. 

Resolved^ That we will encourage our citizens to enlist in the ser- 
vice of the United States ; that we will furnish money and means to 
uniform and equip all who will enlist in said service, and will provide 
liberally for volunteers and their families. 

Resolved, That in all suitable ways we will aid the Federal Govern- 
ment in crushing treason and restoring its authority in every part of 
the United States. 

1862. July 19th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars, "in addition to the sum paid by 
the Government,'* to each volunteer who shall enlist for three 
years and be credited to the quota of the town ; and twenty-two 



BLANDFORD. 297 

hundred dollars were appropriated to pay the same. Septem- 
ber 2d, W. E. Boise, Francis Bates, E. W. Shepard, and 
F. E. Knox were chosen "to act in concert with the selectmen," 
to immediately fill the quota of the town ; in doing which they 
were authorized " to use the whole amount of the surplus reve- 
nue fund of the town," in the payment of bounties to men who 
enlist. Tins committee were not to charge for their services. 
December 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money 
to pay aid to the soldiers' families. 

1863. September 21st, The assessors were instructed "to 
abate the poll-taxes of our volunteers now in the service of the 
United States." 

1864. March 28th, One thousand dollars were appropriated 
to encourage enlistments and to fill the quota of the town. At 
a subsequent meeting the selectmen were instructed to borrow 
four thousand dollars for these purposes. 

1865. August 16th, The selectmen were directed to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer, substitute or re-enlisted veteran, who shall be credited to 
the quota of the town. 

Blandford, according to a return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished eighty-nine men. We believe, however, that 
Blandford furnished about one hundred and ten men, as it filled 
its quota upon every call made by the President, and at the end 
of the war had a surplus of three over and above all demands. 
Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was fourteen thousand nine hundred and 
eighty-two dollars and five cents ($14,982.05). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 
war, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $719.82; in 1863, 
$1,590.97; in 1864, $1,248.92; in 1865, $399.55. Total 
amount, $3,959.26. 

The ladies of each of the religious societies in Blandford 
formed sewing-circles to work for the soldiers, and contributed 
under-clothing, lint, bandages, blackberry and currant wines, 



298 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

canned fruits, and other useful articles, to the value of about 
three hundred dollars. 

Brimfield. — Incorporated July 14, 1731. Population in 
1860, 1,363 ; in 1865, 1,316. Valuation in 1860, $700/J72 ; 
in 1865, $719,750. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William H. Wyles, Sumner 
Parker, Newton S. Hubbard ; in 1862, William II. Wyles, 
Sumner Parker, Edwin A. James ; in 1863, AVilliam H. 
Wyles, Sumner Parker, James S. Blair ; in 1864, William 
H. Wyles, Sumner Parker, Thomas J. Morgan ; in 1865, 
William II. Wyles, James S. Blair, James B. Brown. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Henry F. Brown ; in 
1863 and 1864, George Bacon ; in 1865, Henry F. Brown. 
The town-treasurer from 1848 until 1871 was A. L. Converse. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held June 29th. The selectmen were 
authorized to draw such sums of money from the town treasury 
as they might deem proper to pay State aid to the families of 
volunteers, as provided by law. 

1862. July 31st, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each citizen of the town who 
should enlist for three years to fill the quota of the town. 
Voted, to pay the same aid to the families of those soldiers who 
have died in the service as is paid to the families of the living. 
August 28th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of 
one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months' 
service, enlisting to the credit of the town ; also voted, that if 
any volunteer from Brimfield shall be sick or wounded, " and is 
in need of care or attention, it shall be furnished at the expense 
of the town." 

1863. September 22d, Voted, to furnish aid to the families 
. ^ of men who have been or may hereafter be drafted into the 

military service of the United States." 

1864. April 4th, Voted, to appropriate twelve hundred 
dollars "for the payment of bounties to volunteers;" also, to fix 
the bounty to be paid to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of 
the town for three years at one hundred and twenty-five dollars ; " 



CHESTER. 299 

and the selectmen were authorized to keep oil recruiting, and to 
pay the same amount of bounty to the Ist of March, 1865. 

1865. May 3 Ist, A vote was passed to raise by taxation 
four thousand six hundred and six dollars, " to refund to indi- 
viduals the several sums contributed by them to fill the quotas 
of the town," under the several calls of the President for 
volunteers. 

Brimfield furnished one hundred and thirty-eight men for 
the war, which was a surplus of five over and above all demands. 
Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town for military purposes, 
exclusive of State aid, was fifteen thousand and sixty-four 
dollars and thirty-three cents ($15,064.33). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during the war, and which was after- 
wards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$250.67; in 1862, $1,123.20; in 1863, $1,704.77; in 1864, 
$1,666.47 ; in 1865, $1,108.00. Total amount, $5,853.11. 

The ladies of Brimfield were active during the whole of the 
war in doing good for our soldiers. By subscriptions and fairs 
held by them, they raised $1,803.25 for the Sanitary and 
Christian Commissions ; and before the Fortieth Regiment left 
the State, they raised seventy-five dollars, and with it purchased 
a sword, belt, and sash, which they presented to their towns- 
man, Francis D. Lincoln, who commanded a company in the 
regiment. 

Chester. — Incorporated Oct. 31, 1731. Population in 
1860, 1,314 ; in 1865, 1,266. Valuation in 1860, $456,635 ; 
in 1865, $445,900. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Charles W. Knox, Joseph C. 
Kelso, Erastus D. Ormsby ; in 1862 and 1863, Charles W. 
Knox, Alfred S. Foote, Erastus D. Ormsby; in 1864, Charles 
AV. Knox, Alfred S. Foote, Joseph Kelso; in 1865, Charles 
W. Knox, George S. Williams, Benjamin B. Eastman. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was C. C. Carpenter ; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, Timothy Keefe. The town-treasurer 
during all of these years was Silas P. Searle. 



300 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters relating to 
the war, was held on the 4th of May, 1861 ; at which it was 
voted to "raise two thousand dollars to equip the volunteers 
from Chester, and to pay their support and the support of their 
families while drilling." 

A number of meetings were held during the war, at which 
money was appropriated for the payment of bounties to volun- 
teers and State aid to th^ir families. Tlie returns which we 
have received from Chester are not so full as those which have 
come to us from the other towns, and therefore a full abstract of 
the town's proceedings cannot be given. 

Chester, according to a return made by the selectmen in 1866,. 
furnished ninety-eight men for the war, which is at least twenty- 
five less than the true number, as it filled its quota on every 
call of the President, and at the end of the war had a surplus 
of three over and above all demands. Four were commissioned 
officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was ten thousand six hundred and fifty-nine dollars and 
eighty-four cents ($10,659.84). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $323.20; in 1862, $989.42 ; in 1863, $797.39 ; in 1864, 
$1,942.26; in 1865, $1,089.92. Total amount, $5,142.19. 

Chicopee. — Incorporated April 29, 1848. Population in 
1860, 7,261 ; in 1865, 7,581. Valuation in 1860, $2,782,- 
288 ; in 1865, $3,128,250. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Otis Chapman, Silas 
Mosman, William Thayer, Lucas B. Chapin, Daniel Knapp ; 
in 1863, Otis Chapman, Edgar T. Paige, Daniel Knapp, Lucas 
B. Chapin, Silas Mosman ; in 1864, Sylvanus Adams, William 
R. Kentfield, Henry S. Herrick, Pliny Cad well, George H. 
Knapp ; in 1865, George H. Knapp, Henry S. Herrick, Simon 
G. South worth, Russell S. Farney, Charles S. Stiles. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years 
was Lester Dickenson. 



CHICOPEE. 301 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
connected with the war, was held on the let of May ; at which 
the following preamble and resolution were oflTered by Hon. 
John Wells, and adopted : — 

Whereas the Gk)vemment of the United States is now engaged in a 
struggle for the maintenance of the Constitution and laws, and whereas 
the continuance and preservation of our free institutions and the liber- 
ties of the people are involved in the contest ; therefore — 

Resolved^ That it is the duty of every town to contribute, to the 
extent of its means, to the promotion of the common cause of sustain- 
ing the Government in this crisis of its peril. 

June 17th, Three thousand dollars were appropriated, to be 
expended under the direction of the selectmen, for State aid to 
the families of volunteers, as provided by law. 

1862. August 22d, The bounty to each volunteer for nine 
months' service, who should enlist and be credited to the quota 
of the town, was fixed at one hundred dollars ; and twelve 
thousand dollars were appropriated to pay the same, and for 
incidental expenses in recruiting the men. The treasurer was 
authorized to borrow the money. It was also — 

Voted, That the selectmen be requested to appoint some suitable 
agent in behalf of the town, to look after the welfare of those who have 
gone or may go to the war from Chicopee, to promote their comfort 
when sick or wounded, to aid them in returning home when disabled, 
to communicate from time to time with their fnends and the town 
authorities information respecting them, and the casualties which befall 
them, and that the expenses attending such agency be borne by the 
town. 

1863. No action appears to have been necessary on the part 
of the town to fill its quotas and provide for the comfort of the 
families of volunteers during this year. 

1864. August 2d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist in the 
military service for three years, and be credited to the quota 
of the town ; and money was appropriated to pay the same. 
A vote identical with this was passed on the 26th of 
December. 



302 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Chicopee, according to a return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished six hundred and eighty men for the war, which 
we believe to be one hundred less than the number actually 
furnished, as Chicopee filled its quota on every call made by the 
President, and at the end of the war had a surplus of forty-eight 
over and above all demands. Thirty-one were commissioned 
officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was fifty-six thousand one hundred and sixty-seven dollars 
and seventy-eight cents ($56,167.78). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 
war, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows : In 1861, $1,308.59 ; in 1862, $8,462.17 ; in 
1863, $12,013.32; in 1864, $10,800.00; in 1865, $8,500.00. 
Total amount, $41,084.08. 

The Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Society of Chicopee was organized 
early in the war, of which Mrs. James T. Ames was president 
during the whole time. This society sent forward to the army 
clothing and hospital supplies, the money value of which, with- 
out counting the labor expended by the ladies, was more than 
five thousand dollars. At the close of the war the society had 
a cash balance on hand of fourteen hundred dollars, which was 
placed in charge of trustees, for the erection of a soldiers' monu- 
ment, or memorial hall, whenever the citizens of the town shall 
be ready for such a work. 

Granville. — Incorporated Jan. 25, 1754. Population 
in 1860, 1,385 ; in 1865, 1,363. Valuation in 1860, $411,508 ; 
in 1865, $516,277. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Edmund Barlow, D wight M. 
Wheeler, Edmund Holcomb ; in 1862, James W. Spelman, 
William Wells, Wesley L. Boise ; in 1863, James W. Spel- 
man, R. H. Barlow, Daniel H. Drake; in 1864, Dwight M. 
Wheeler, Frank Robinson, Daniel H. Drake; in 1865, R. H. 
Barlow, Silas Noble, James W. Spelman. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in the years 1861, 1863, 
and 1865, was R. S. Brown; in 1862 and 1864, L. N. Shep- 
ard. 



HOLLAND. 303 

The information we have received from Granville is quite 
deficient. Nothing appears to have been done by the town in 
its corporate capacity during the years 1861 and 1862. What 
we have received is contained in the two following paragraphs : 

"1863. At a meeting held on the 2d of March, the town 
'voted to abate poll-taxes of three-years men enlisted in the 
United-States service.' " 

1864. "Voted the same." August 5th, "Voted, to raise 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars to pay each person who 
shall volunteer into the service of the United States for the 
period of one year or more.'' "Voted, to raise one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each man to deposit in the hands of 
the State Treasurer, to the amount of J, or 25 per cent, of our 
last quota. 

Granville, according to the return made in 1866 by the 
selectmen, furnished one hundred and thirty-five men for the 
war, which is within five or ten of the exact number, as the 
town furnished its full quota on every call made by the Presi- 
dent, and at the end of the war had a surplus of five over and 
above all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was nine 
thousand six hundred and seventy-five dollars ($9,675.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 
war, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $186.30; in 1862, $1,323.72; in 
1863, 11,699.19; in 1864, $1,458.71; in 1865, $685.69. 
Total amount, $5,353.61. 

Holland. — Incorporated July 5, 1785. Population in 
1860, 419; in 1865, 368. Valuation in 1860, $147,186; in 
1865, $131,000. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were F. L. Burley, William 
A. Webber, Warren A. Wallis ; in 1863, William A. Webber, 
Horace Wallis, R. A. Blodgett ; in 1864 and 1865, F. L. 
Burley, N. P. Marcy, Squire J. Ballard. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861 was F. B. Blodg- 
ett; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Francis Wight. 



304 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1861. November 5th, The treasurer, under the direction of 
the selectmen, was authorized to pay State aid to the fiimilies of 
soldiers, as provided by law. 

1862. July 30th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty not exceeding one hundred dollars to each of four men 
who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of 
the town. The treasurer was directed to borrow four hundred 
dollars to pay the same. August 30th, Voted, to pay a bounty 
of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine 
months' service to fill the quota of the town. The treasurer 
was directed to borrow the money. Voted, that whenever any 
of our soldiers shall be sent to hospital, and the selectmen 
ascertain that " they need extra nursing, they shall furnish it at 
the expense of the town." 

1863. Nothing of importance in relation to the war was 
done by the town during this year. 

1864. April 4th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist and be credited to the 
quotas of the town under the pending calls of the President for 
more men, and to reimburse individuals who had paid bounties 
from their own means. The selectmen were authorized to bor- 
row money to pay the same. June 11th, A bounty of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars was authorized to be paid to 
each volunteer, and to each person who shall put a substitute 
into the service, when satisfactory evidence is furnished the 
selectmen that they have entered the military service and have 
been credited to the quota of the town. This was continued 
until the end of the war. 

Holland, according to the return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished twenty eight men for the war, which was less 
than the actual number by at least twenty, as the town had at 
the end of the war a surplus of four over and above all demands. 
One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was one thousand one hundred and 
seventy-five dollars ($1,175.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during the war, and which was 



HOLTOKE. 305 

repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $49.60; 
in 1862, $71.00; in 1863, $184.07; in 1864, $92.41; in 
1865, $60.28. Total amount, $457.36. 

HoLYOKE. — Incorporated March 14, 1850. Population in 
1861, 4,997 ; in 1865, 5,648. Valuation in 1860, $2,080,834 ; 
in 1865, $2,579,250. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Joel Russell, S. II. Walker, 
A. C. Shiter; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, W. B. C. Pearsons, 
Eufus Mosher, Chester Craft; in 1865, E. Whitaker, E. H. 
Ball, R. S. Howard. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during these years was 
Gustavus Snow. 

1861. A town-meeting was held April 29th, to consider 
matters relating to the Rebellion, at which it was voted that the 
trejisurer be authorized to borrow the sum of three thousand 
dollars, " to provide munitions and outfits for those who may 
volunteer to defend our country," and to make comfortable pro- 
vision for their families. 

1862. March 17th, Voted, to continue aid to the families 
of volunteers as provided by an act of the Legislature. July 
18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars " to every 
volunteer soldier who may enlist or who has enlisted in the 
military service " to fill the quota of the town, said bounty to 
be paid when mustered into the United-States service, and that 
the treasurer borrow a sum, not to exceed five thousand three 
hundred dollars, to pay the same. August 2l8t, Voted, to pay 
a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting for 
nine months' service, and the treasurer be authorized to borrow 
money sufficient to pjiy the same. September 2d, The same 
amount of bounty was continued, and the treasurer was 
authorized to borrow more money for the purpose of paying it. 
December 9th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not to 
exceed eight thousand dollars, to pay aid to the families of 
volunteers. 

1863. At the regular yearly town-meeting held March 16th, 

voted, to continue paying aid to the families of the soldiers ; 

and for that purpose the treasurer was authorized to borrow, not 

20 



306 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION, 

to exceed nine thousand dollars. It was also voted to refund 
the poll-tax to all three-years volunteers *'that have paid on 
last year's tax." September 28th, Voted, "to pay and adjust 
the proi)ortion of town bounty tax according to the provisions 
of the 9th section of chapter 218 of the Acts of 1863, and 
raise money for the same." 

1864. March 21st, Voted, to refund to individuals the 
amounts subscribed by them for paying bounties to volunteers, 
*' except so much as was lost by desertion, and non-acceptance." 
May 23d, Voted, to pay every man who shall be drafted and 
accepted " under the present call for fifty-two men, and shall go 
himself or furnish a substitute, one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars." The treasurer was authorized to borrow money for 
the purpose. June 10th, Voted, " to raise a sum not to exceed 
three hundred dollars to each volunteer that shall be accepted," 
one hundred and seventy-five dollars of which to be paid in 
money, and one hundred and twenty-five dollars in notes of the 
town. 

1865. March 20th, Voted, to continue aid to the families of 
volunteers, and the treasurer to borrow eight thousand dollars 
for that purpose. August 12th, The treasurer was directed to 
borrow, not to exceed ten thousand dollars, to refund to each 
resident of the town the amount contributed by him to fill the 
quota of the town in 1864 ; also, "for commutation money paid 
by him," not to exceed three hundred dollars to any one person; 
that persons who were drafted and sent substitutes, or who 
were drafted and went to the war, shall receive the same as 
those who paid commutation ; also, that one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars be paid to each re-enlisted veteran who was 
credited to the town and has not received town bounty. 

Holyoke furnished five hundred and thirty-three men for the 
war, which was a surplus of four over and above all demands. 
Fifteen were commissioned ofl5cers. The total amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, 
exclusive of State aid, was thirty-four thousand and forty-seven 
dollars and ninety-one cents ($34,047.91). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 



LONGMEADOW. 307 

war, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $1,132.37; in 1862, $5,717.90; in 
1863, $9,11)4.27; in 1864, $7,400.00; in 1865, $3,500.00. 
Total amount, $26,944.54. 

LoNGMEADOW. — Incorporated Oct. 17, 1783. Population 
in 1860, 1,376 ; in 1865, 1,480. Valuation in 1860, §917,- 
994; in 1865, $1,016,500. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Stephen T. Colton, David 
Lathrop, Abel H. Calkins. These gentlemen were re-elected 
every year of the war, with the exception of Mr. Calkins, who 
was succeeded in 1863 by Horace Hills. 

The town-clerk during the whole time was Oliver Wolcott. 
The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Samuel Kilborn ; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, Dimond Chandler. 

1861. An extra town-meeting was held May 15th, at which 
Thomas Marther, William E. Boies, Alfred Cooley, William 
H. Burt, Henry E. Dewey, Charles B. Pomeroy, R. P. O. 
Markham, Oliver Dwight, and Randolph Stebbins, were ap- 
pointed to consider the " subject of appropriating money for sup- 
porting the Government and laws in the impending war against 
anarchy and Rebellion." They reported to pay each volunteer 
one dollar a day when engaged in drill or military exercise 
until mustered into the United-States service ; also such sum 
which added to his Government pay, shall be equal to one 
dollar a day while in the service ; that his family shall receive 
"all necessary support at the expense of the town;" and a 
committee was appointed to carry the same into eiFect, and to 
draw upon the treasurer of the town from time to time for money, 
not exceeding in all five thousand dollars. The town-treasurer 
was authorized to borrow the money, and the amount actually 
expended be provided for by a special tax at the next annual 
town-meeting. November 5th, The town voted to furnish State 
aid to the families of volunteers, and the treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow the money. 

1862. July 19th, Voted, to borrow one thousand dollars 
for aid to soldiers' families ; also twenty-five hundred dollars for 
bounties and recruiting expenses. August 29th9 Voted, to pay 



308 MASSACHUSETTS IX THE REBELLION. 

n bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists 
for nine months to the credit of the town ; aLso, to borrow one 
thousand dollars to pay State aid to the soldiers' families. 

18fi3. October 9th, The treasurer of the town was author- 
ized "to borrow such sums of money as may be necessary 
to adjust certain accounts of money paid to volunteers." De- 
cember 18th, A committee of nine was appointed to act in 
concert w^ith the selectmen in procuring volunteers to fill the 
quota of the town, and to j)rocure and disburse money subscrij)- 
tions in aid of recruiting;. The meetini; voted to act as a com- 
niittee of the whole in aid of the same objects. 

1864. Aj)ril 25th, The town voted to raise by a tax four 
thousand two hundred and fifty dollars to j)ay bounties to thirty- 
four men enlisting to the credit of the town. June 4th, Voted, 
to authorize the treasurer to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars up to March 1, 18(55, to each recruit who 
shall be mustered into the service of the United States and 
credited to the quota of the town. 

Longmeadow furnished one hundred and thirty-nine men 
for the war (of whom fourteen were substitutes put in by indi- 
vidual citizens at their own expense), which was a surplus of 
thirteen over and above all demands. Three were couunis- 
sioned officers. The amount of money ap[)ropriated and ex- 
pended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was thirteen thousand six hundred and fifty-five dollars and 
seventy-seven cents ($13,655.77). The amount contributed 
by private subscription for the same purpose was $15,234.50, 
making the total amount $28,81)0.27. 

The amount of money raised and expended for State aid to 
soldiers' families during the war, and afterwards repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $64.63; in 1862, 
$670.31); in 1863, $1,477.60; in 1864, $1,176.76; in 1865, 
$593.46. Total amount, $3,982.84. 

Ludlow. — Incorporated Feb. 28, 1774. Population in 
1860, 1,174; in 1865, $1,233. Valuation in 1860, $440,- 
734: in 1865, $455,050. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Benjamin Sikes, Roderick Col- 



LUDLOW. 309 

Hns, Dan Hubbard ; in 18G2 and 1803, Benjamin Sikes, 
Roderick Collins, Gilbert E. Fuller; in 18<>4, Arteinas II. 
Whitney, Jacob S. Eaton, Francis F. M*Lean ; in 18G5, Fran- 
cis F. M'Lean, Henry Charles, Jacob S. Eaton. 

The town-clerk and town -treasurer in 1861 was John P. 
Hubbard; in 1802 and 1863, Albert Fuller; in 1864, John 
P. Hubbard ; in 1805, George E. Root. 

1861. A legal town-meeting was held sometime during this 
year, at which it was voted to appropriate two thousand dollars 
" for volunteers in the United-States service from Ludlow, as 
follows : fifteen dollars per month for each when engaged in 
actual drill service, and five dollars per month for each volun- 
teer's fainilv while he is engfafjed in drill or actual service." 

1862. A meeting was held August 23d. " Voted, that the 
town pay one hundred dollars to each of seventeen men who 
will volunteer, and are accej)ted in the United-States service, for 
the first call by the President for three hundred thousand." 

1803. November 3d, "Voted, to appropriate twenty-four 
hundred dollars, to be paid as follows : one hundred and fifty 
dollars to each volunteer to fill the quota, on the last call of the 
President for three hundred thousand men." 

1804. Aj)ril 4th, Voted, to raise seventeen hundred and 
seventy-five dollars to pay bounties to volunteers. June 18th, 
"Voted, to raise twenty-five hundred dollars to make up the 
deficiency for paying volunteers for filling our last quota." This 
is all the record we have. 

Ludlow furnished one hundred and thirty men for the war, 
which was a surplus of six over and above all demands. One 
was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclu*»ive of State aid, was ten tiious.and nine hundred and fifty- 
nine dollars and sixty-eight cents ($10,959.68). 

The amount of money raised and expended during the war 
for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the Com- 
numwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $262.08; in 1862, 
$1,502.58; in 1863, $2,119.20; in 1864, $2,547.60; in 
1805, $1,900.00. Total amount, $8,331.46. 



310 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

MoNSON. — Incorporated April 25, 1760. Population in 
1860, 3,164; in 1865, 3,132. Valuation in 1860, §1,103,- 
143 : in 1865, $1,316, 700. 

The selectmen in 1861 were D. G. Potter, E. R. Walker, 
E. W. Sholes; in 1862, D. G. Potter, E. K. Walker, Austin 
Fuller; in 18()3, D. G. Potter, E. R. Walker, N. F. Rogers; 
in 1864, D. G. Potter, Hiram Newton, Dwiglit Kang; in 
1865, D. G. Potter, Dwight King, J. B. Foster. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was N. F. 
Rogers ; in 1865, E. B. Miles. The town-treasurer during all 
the years of the war was William N. Flynt. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 3d of May, at which it 
was voted that all residents of Monson, while drilling and pre- 
paring to enter the military service of the United States, "shall 
have their support ; " and when enlisted and mustered into the 
military service " shall have a good outfit, and be paid ten dol- 
lars a month by the town while in actual service, and their 
families shall receive a sufiScient sum to support them during 
their absence." The treasurer was authorized to borrow what- 
ever sum of money might be required, and a committee of 
seven was appointed to carry the above votes into eftbct. The 
following resolution was read and unanimously adopted : — 

Resolved^ That the people of Monson arc unanimous for upholding, 
8upix)rting, and defending the United-States Government, and to that 
end are ready to respond to the demand of the legally constituted 
authorities of Massachusetts and the United States in the performance 
of every loyal and patriotic duty. 

1862. At a meeting held on the 26th of July, the select- 
men were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to 
each volunteer, to the number of thirty-six, who shall enlist for 
three years in the military service, and be credited to the quota 
of the town. At another meeting held on the 8th of August, 
it was voted to pay the same bounty to volunteers who shall 
enlist for nine months' service, and be credited to the quota of 
the town. This bounty on the 24th of November was increased 
fifty dollars. 



MONTGOMERY. 311 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its eoq)orate capacity, during this year, in matters relating 
to the war, although recruiting went on, and the payment of 
State aid to the soldiers' families was continued. 

1864. On the 18th of April the selectmen were authorized 
to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars "to 
each volunteer, or drafted man, for three years' service, who 
shall be mustered into the military service and credited to the 
quota of the town ; " and the treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money to pay the same. On the 30th of June the treasurer 
was authorized to borrow money, not exceeding ten thousand 
dollars, to be used by the selectmen as they may deem expe- 
dient, to encourage enlistments, and to fill the quota of the 
town "upon any call, or calls, made by the President, which 
hereafter he may issue." 

Monson, according to a return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished one hundred and eighty men for the war, which 
was at least one hundred less than the town actually furnished, 
as it filled its quota upon every call made by the President, and 
at the end of the war had a surplus of eighteen over and above 
all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty thou- 
sand four hundred and eighty-eight dollars and thirty-six cents 
($30,488.36). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers during the 
war, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $384.70; in 1862, $1,504.38; in 
1863, S2,649.92; in 1864, $3,292.76; in 1865, $2,000.00. 
Total amount, 810,031.76. 

The ladies of Monson " worked constantly and faithfully, as 
onlv mothers who have sons in need of their assistance can 
work. Packages of food and clothing were sent to the army 
often during the war." 

MoNTGOMEKY. — Incorporated Nov. 28, 1780. Population 
in 1860, 371 ; in 1865, 354. Valuation in 1860, $156,175; 
in 1865, $158,850. 



312 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Augustus A. Moore, Henry S. 
Stiles, Horace F. Moore ; in 1862, William Squier, Aaron P. 
Parks, Gilbert Squier ; in 1863, William Squier, Augustus A. 
Moore, Orlando W. Axtell; in 1864, Edwin S. Snow, Horace 
F. Moore, R. Wesley Clark; in 1865, Aaron P. Parks, R. 
Wesley Clark, Horace F. Moore. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1865, was Aaron P. 
Parks ; in 1863, Lewis F. Allyn ; in 1864, Horace Bartholo- 
mew. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was 
Lewis T. Allyn ; in 1864 and 1865, Augustus A. Moore. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its legal capacity, during this year in regard to the war. 

1862. March 10th, Voted, to raise one hundred dollars for 
aid to soldiers' families. April 7th, The selectmen were au- 
thorized to borrow, not exceeding four hundred dollars, for the 
same purpose. July 28th, Voted, to raise five hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to pay bounties to volunteers, and to drafted 
men if there should be any. The treasurer was authorized to 
borrow the money. Discretionary power was given to the 
selectmen to pay aid to soldiers' families. September 15th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volun- 
teer for nine months' service until the quota of the town 
should be filled. The selectmen were authorized to borrow the 
money. 

1863. April 6th, The bounty to volunteers for three years' 
service was raised to two hundred dollars. Four hundred and 
fifty dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. 

1864. April 11th, One thousand dollars were appropriated 
for aid to soldiers' families. The bounty to volunteers for 
three years' service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars. July 18th, The treasurer and selectmen were author- 
ized to borrow fifteen hundred dollars with which to pay boun- 
ties. Voted, "to pay two hundred and twenty-five dollars per 
man, if necessary, in addition to one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars already voted by the town," to obtain eight men to 
complete the quota of the town. December 13th, Twelve 
hundred dollars were appropriated to p.iy " for procuring volun- 
teers." 



PALMER. 313 

1865. March 28th, Voted, to authorize the town-treasurer 
to borrow such sums of money as may be necessary for aid to 
soldiers' families. 

Montgomery furnished forty-four men for the war, which 
was a surplus of eight over and above all demands. None 
were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was six thousand and forty-nine dollars 
($6,049.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town^ 
during the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and 
which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, wjis as 
follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $401.99; in 1863, $466.00; 
in 1864, $633.00; in 1865, $632.11. Total amount, $2,- 
133.10. 

Palmer. — Incorporated Jan. 30, 1752. Population in 
1860, 3,082; in 1865, 3,081. Valuation in 1860, $1,167,- 
291; in 1865, $1,254,000. 

The selectmen in 1861 were George Moorcs, J. S. Loo mis, 
Gilbert Barker; in 1862, J. S. Loomis, Abel Webber, Nathan 
Ilarwood ; in 1863 and 1864, Abel Webber, E. B. Gates, 
P. W. Webster; in 1865, Enos Calkins, George Moores, E. 
B. Gates. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Daniel Gran- 
ger; in 1864, J. H. Blair; in 1865, Lyman Dimock. The 
town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Daniel Granger; 
in 1864, J. II. Blair ; in 1865, L. Dimock. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 4th of May, at which the 
town voted to appropriate two thousand dollars " to arm, equip, 
and drill a company for military service, and three thousand 
dollars to provide for the support of the families of volunteers 
living in Palmer." 

1H62. A town-meeting was held on the 19th of July, at 
which the selectmen were authorized to pfiy a bounty of one 
hundred dollars to each volunteer who should enlist for three 
years, and be credited to the quota of the town. Another meet- 



314 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

ing was held on the 16th of August, at which it was voted to 
pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months' service 
who should enlist, and be credited to the quota of the town. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken hy the town in 
relation to the war during this year, although recruiting was 
continued as before, and State aid was furnished to soldiers' 
families. 

1864. On the 11th of April a town-meeting was held, at 
which it was voted to fix the bounty to volunteers for three 
years' service, who shall be credited to the quota of the town, 
at one hundred and twenty-five dollars ; and this bounty was 
continued to be paid until the end of the war. 

1865. At a meeting held during this year, it was voted to 
refund to citizens, who had paid of their own means to assist 
recruiting, the sum of eight thousand and forty-one dolhirs. 

Palmer, according to a return made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished three hundred and eleven men for the war, 
which was very nigh the exact number. The town furnished 
its full quota on every call of the President for men, and at the 
end of the war had a surplus of seventeen over and above all 
demands. Six were commissioned ofl5cers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on accoimt 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-six thousand nine 
hundred and twenty dollars ($26,920.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which 
was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as fol- 
lows : In 1861, $349.98; in 1862, $2,060.99; in 1863, 
$3,707.07 ; in 1864, $4,578.58 ; in 1865, $3,000.00. Total 
amount, $13,696.62. 

The ladies of Palmer did much good work for the soldiers. 
The net profits of one fair held by them amounted to three 
hundred and forty-seven dollars. It is estimated that one 
thousand dollars in addition were raised by them for the benefit 
of the sick and wounded. 

Russell. — Incorporated Feb. 25, 1792. Population in 
1860, 605; in 1865, 619. Valuation in 1860, $198,462; in 
1865, $212,800. 



RUSSELL. 315 

The selectmen in 1861 were N. D. Parks, H. A. Gould, 
E. A. Russell ; in 1862, N. D. Parks, A. G. Mullory, Horace 
Heath ; in 18(»3, X. D. Parks, Dexter Parks, E. A. Russell ; 
in 18G4 and 1865, Roland Parks, Dexter Parks, D. S. 
Bronson. 

The town-clerk during these years was Roland Parks. The 
town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was Roland 
Parks ; in 1865, Horace Parks. 

1861. A legal town-meeting was held on the 1st of May, at 
which the following preamble and resolution were adopted : — 

Whereas our GoverDment is in a perilous condition, and men are 
needed to protect the rights and liberties of American citizens, and 
maintain our Government; therefore — 

Resolved^ That we will equip such of our townsmen as have, or may, 
volunteer their services to protect and maintain our Government; also, 
that we will pay the families of such volunteers the sum of ten dollars 
a month, to commence at the time said volunteers are called upon to 
leave their families, and continue until the close of their services in 
the present war, or until the General Goveniment shall provide for 
their necessities. 

The selectmen were also authorized to appropriate money, 
and to call out the militia of the town for drill, " if they think 
it expedient." November 5th, The town voted *'to authorize 
the selectmen to pay State aid to the families of volunteers, as 
provided by act of the Legislature." 

1862. July 15th, Voted, to respond to the call of the 
Governor for seven volunteers to fill the quota of the town ; to 
raise seven hundred dollars to aid the family of each volunteer 
who may enlist to the credit of tlie town ; and also to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who may enlist 
for that town. August 30th, The town voted to raise one thou- 
sand dollars for aid to the soldiers' families, and to pay bounties 
to volunteers. The town-clerk was also instructed to ascertain, 
if possible, whether any of the volunteers from that town had 
been wounded "in the late battles and needed assistance, and, if 
so, that the selectmen furnish what aid they may require." 

I«s63. The town during this year had furnished all the men 
required of it, and at its close there were not as many able- 



316 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

bodied men in tlie town between the military ages as they had 
in the service : more than one-half of the men liable to military 
duty were at the front. 

1864. April 11th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five d4)llar8 to each volunteer who would enlist to 
fill the quota of the town. July 29th, Voted, to rai^^e one 
thousand dollars for recruiting purposes, and to keep tlie quota 
of the town full. 

1865. Two citizens of the town having put in substitutes 
at a large expense, the town voted, March 7th, to pay each of 
them one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

Russell furnished sixty-five men for the war, w^hich was 
a surplus of five over and above all demands. Two were 
commissioned officers. The total amount of money raised 
and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive of 
State aid, was five thousand and forty dollars and fifty cents 
($5,040.50). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for the payment of State aid to the families of sol- 
diers, and which was afterwards repaid by tlie Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $121.79 ; in 1862, $1,003.60; in 
1863, $976.00 ; in 1864, $1,058.41 ; in 1865, $750.00. Total 
amount, $3,909.80. 

SouTHWiCK. — Incorporated Nov. 17, 1770. Population 
in 1860, 1,188; in 1865, 1,155. Valuation in 1860, $593,- 
595; in 1865, $604,200. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Carmi ShurtlefF, Abram Kising, 
Luther Fowler; in 1862, A. J. Marvin, A. F. Webb, A. P. 
Easton ; in 1863 and 1864, A. P. Easton, A. J. Marvin, 
A. F. Webb; in 1865, A. P. Easton, N. S. Noble, A. J. 
Forward. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was C. J. 
Root. The town-treasurer during the years 1861 and 1862 
was Heaton Granger; in 1863, Herman Laflin ; in 1864 and 
1865, S. L. Granger. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider questions 
relating to the war, was held November 26th, at which it was 



SOUTH WICK. 317 

voted to raise three hundred dollars to pay State aid to the 
families of soldiers living in the town, as provided by the act 
of the Legislature. 

1862. July 12th, Voted, to raise sixteen hundred dollars, 
to be expended under the direction of the selectmen for the 
same purpose ; and five hundred dollars were directed to be paid 
" for the benefit of the families or parents of volunteers belong- 
ing to the town who may have died in the service of their coun- 
try." August 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for nine months to 
fill the quota of the town. December 16th, Eight hundred 
dollars were appropriated to pay State aid to the families of 
volunteers. 

1^64. May 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, and to each substi- 
tute for a drafted man, who shall be credited to the quota of the 
town. July 9th, The selectmen were directed to borrow money, 
sufficient to reimburse to individuals the money subscribed by 
them to pay bounties, not to exceed one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars for each volunteer ; also, that that amount shall be 
paid to each volunteer who shall hereafter enlist and be mus- 
tered into the United-States service to the credit of the town. 

1865. April 2d, "Voted, to refund the money contributed 
by individuals in aid of, and for the purpose of, filling this 
town's quota." 

Southwick furnished one hundred and eighteen men for the 
war, which was a surplus of eight over and above all demands. 
Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was fourteen thousand three hundred 
and seventy-three dollars ($14,373.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for the payment of State aid to the families of 
soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows : In 1861, §87.94; in 1862, $959.65 ; 
m 1863, $1,800.06; in 1864, $1,900.96; in 1865, $855.64. 
Total amount, $5,604.25. 

"The ladies of Southwick did their full share of patriotic 
labor in aid of the soldiers all through the war." 



318 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Springfield. — Incorporated as a town May 14, 1C.*^>6; 
as a city April 12, 1852. Population in 1860, 15,199; in 
1865, 22,038. Valuation in 1860, $8,669,806; in 1«65, 
$13,379,212. 

The mayor in 1861 was Stephen C. Bemis ; aldermen, 
Henry Gray, Ephraim W. Bond, H. N. Case, Nathaniel How- 
ard, Charles Woodman, Amos Call, William Smith, A. J. 
Plumer. In 1862, Stephen C. Bemis, mayor; Henry Gray, 
E. W. Bond, H. N. Case, T. W. Wason, Horace Kibbe, 
Horace Smith, William Smith, H. S. Eveans, aldermen. In 
1863, Henry Alexander, Jr., mayor; Justin M. Cooley, Wil- 
liam Patton, William K. Baker, Daniel L. Harris, William 
Bodertha, Horace Smith, Virgil Perkins, Andrew J. Plumer, 
aldermen. In 1864, Henry Alexander, Jr., mayor; Norman 
W. Talcott, William Patton, Albert D. Briggs, Frederick H. 
Harris, Charles Barrows, Warren H. Wilkinson, Virgil Per- 
kins, Harvey E. Moseley, aldermen. In 1865, Albert D. 
Briggs, mayor ; Henry S. Hyde, George R. Tormsley, Otis 
Childs, Frederick H. Harris, Charles Barrows, Warren H. 
Wilkinson, Andrew J. Plumer, aldermen. 

The city clerk and city treasurer in 1861 was Horace C. 
Lee; in 1862, Samuel B. Spooner, Jr. ; in 1863, 1864, and 
1865, Albert F. Folsom.* 

1861. The first action taken by the city, in regard to the war, 
was the passage of a resolve by the city council on the 18th 
of April appropriating five thousand dollars to assist the mili- 
tary companies of Springfield in making necessary preparations 
for entering upon active military service. On the 29th of the 
same month twenty thousand dollars were appropriated for 
the same general purposes. 

1862. August 26th, The city government passed the fol- 
lowing resolution : — 



* Horace C. Lee resigned Oct 21, 18C1, to take command of the Twenty- 
seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, and Henry Smith was chosen to 
serve the balance of the year. Samuel B. Spooner, Jr., resigned Sept. 30, 1862, 
to accept the commission of captain of Company A, Forty-sixth Regiment, and 
Albert F. Folsom was chosen to All the vacancy, and has remained in office ever 
since. 



SPBINGFIELD. 319 

Besohed, That in view of the limited time in which we are called 
upon to fill our present quota of nine-months men, it is earnestly 
recommended that the citizens close their several places of business at 
the hour of four p.m., and thereafter on each day until the full number 
of men is secured. 

On the 30th of September an order was passed " authorizing 
the city treasurer to pay as a bounty, out of the 'militia fund,' 
the sum of one hundred dollars each to all persons, residents of 
Sprinn;field, who have been, or may be, within thirty days from 
this date, mustered into the service of the United States at 
' Camp Banks,' * as mcml^ers of the ' Union Guards,' even 
though the number of men thus paid would exceed the quota 
required of the city of Springfield under the call of the Presi- 
dent for three hundred thousand men for nine months' service." 

Mr. Folsom, the city treasurer and clerk of Springfield, 
writes : — 

"The sentiments of our citizens have been much better expressed 
by the promptness with which they met every call of the President 
for troops, and by the liberality in voting money for bounty and other 
necessary expenditures, than by resolutions written and recorded; 
consequently I can report but an extract from the only resolutions 
relating directly to war matters passed by the city council during the 
war; and, with the recommendations therein expressed, will say, that 
nearly all ])laces of business were promptly closed, and mass meetings 
of the citizens, presided over by the mayor, were held daily — Sundays 
not always excepted — in front of the city hall, until the quota was 
filled. As will be seen by the order passed Sept. 30, 1862, which I 
enclose, we did not stop the good work as soon as our quota was filled, 
but continued the payment of bounties until we exceeded the quota, so 
that we were able to furnish Boston with one hundred and eight men, 
"West Springfield with eleven, Westfield with ten, Chester with ten, 
Agawam with seven, and Holland and Monson with two each." 

Springfield furnished twenty-five hundred men for the war, 
which was a surplus of two hundred and six over and above all 
demands. Ninety-six were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the city on 

* " Camp Banks " was a military camp established a few miles from tlie city 
of Springfield. 



320 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was two hundred 
and ei<;hteen thousand and ninetv-nine dollars and fiftv-five 
cents ($218,099.55). In addition to this, eighty-seven thou- 
sand four hundred and fifty-six dollars were subscribed and i)aid 
by individual citizens to encourage recruiting, of which amount 
thirty-seven thousand three hundred and thirty-two dollars were 
reimbursed by the city. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the city dur- 
ing the war for the payment of State aid to the families of 
soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows: In 18G1, $1,752.89; in 18G2, $12,- 
128.23; in 18()3, $20,878.10; in 1864, $35,189.02 ; in 1S()5, 
$27,500.00. Total amount, $97,449.24. 

The ladies of Springfield were equally liberal and patriotic 
in their contributions for the soldiers during the whole of the 
wjir. A soldiers' fair was held by them in December, 1864, 
for the benefit of the " Soldiers' Rest," an institution located 
at that time near the railroad depot for the care of the sick and 
wounded, which netted the handsome sum of nineteen hundred 
and forty-six dollars. 

Tolland. — Incorporated June 14, 1810. Population in 
1860, 596; in 1865, 511. Valuation in 1860, $280,774; 
in 1865, $298,588. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Philander F. Twining, Daniel 
Spring, Edward L. Tinker, Jr. ; in 1862, Hiram C Brown, 
Lyman Twining, George W. Granger ; in 1863 and 18(54, 
George AY. Granger, Philander F. Twining, Lyman Twining ; 
in 1865, George W. Granger, Philander F. Twining, Nathan 
E. Slocum. 

The town-clerk during the years 1861 and 1862 was Rufus 
Smith. During 1863, 1864, and 1865, William W. Harrison. 
The town-treasurer all throu<i:h the war was Edward L. Tinker. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting held in Tolland, to act 
upon matters connected with the war, was held in June, at 
which it was voted to raise one hundred and fifty dollars to pay 
State aid to the families of volunteers living in the town. 

1862. January — , One hundred and seventy dollars were 



WALES. 321 

appropriated for the same purpose. July — , Eight hundred and 
forty dollars were appropriated to pay bounties to volunteers 
enlisting to fill the quota of the town. August — , Voted, to pay 
a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars " for each volunteer 
to fill our quota of nine-months men called for by the President." 
December — , Voted, to pay each drafted man or volunteer a 
bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars "to fill the quota." 
December 29th, Voted, to raise five hundred dollars for bounties 
to volunteers to fill the quota of the town. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town in 
its corporate capacity in relation to the war during this year, 
although recruiting was continued during the whole time. 

1864. April — , The town appropriated thirteen hundred 
dollars for State aid for the year to the families of soldiers 
residing in the town. 

1865. April 24th, Voted, to raise four hundred dollars to 
pay bounties to veteran recruits who had re-enlisted to fill the 
quota of the town. 

Tolland furnished seventy-four men for the war, which was 
a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. One was a 
commissioned oflficer. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive 
of State aid, was seven thousand two hundi'ed and ninety-seven 
dollars and forty-nine cents ($7,297.49). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $179.62; in 1862, $746.57; in 1863, $785.00; in 
1864, $658.80 ; in 1865, $200.00. Total amount, $2,569.99. 

Wales. — Incorporated September 18, 1762. Population 
in 1860, 677; in 1865, 696. Valuation in 1860, $277,868; 
in 1865, $254,600. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Warren Shaw, S. V. R. Smith, 

William L. Needham ; in 1862, Adams Stewart, Eden D. 

Shaw, Warren Needham ; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Absalom 

Gardner, C. D. Brewer, Warren Shaw. 

21 




322 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Tlic town-clerk and town-treasurer during: all of these vears 
was G. S. Rogers. 

1862. The first legal town-meeting to consider questions in 
relation to the war was held August 18th, at which it was voted 
to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to eacji volunteer for 
three years' service who enlists and is credited to the quota of 
the town, and to refund "all moneys paid by the citizens to 
volunteers furnished by the town." August 23d, The same 
bounty was authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months' 
service. 

1863. April 6th, "Voted, to raise by tax eight hundred and 
fifty dollars to reimburse the subscribers who advanced the 
money paid as bounties last summer to the three-years volun- 
teers from this town." 

1864. May 2d, "Voted, to assess a tax to pay back the 
money subscribed and paid by individuals to volunteers, since 
last July, not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars to 
each man." 

From this time to the end of the war the town continued to 
pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars ; and 
several meetings were held, at which money was appropriated to 
pay bounties, and to reimburse citizens who had ^'oluntarily 
expended of their own private means to encourage recruiting, 
to pay bounties to volunteers, and to furnish aid to their 
families. 

Wales furnished eighty-two men for the war, which was a 
8ur2)lus of nine over and above all demands. Four were com- 
missioned oflBcers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, 
was eight thousand five hundred and nineteen dollars and eighty - 
two cents ($8,519.82). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during tlie war, and which was 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $155.00; in 1862, $891.12; in 1863, $1,362.21; 
in 1864, $1,202.46; in 1865, $750. Total amount, $4,360.79. 

"The ladies of Wales were active and liberal on behalf 



WESTFIELD. 323 

of the soldiers from the beginning to the end of the war, and 
every few weeks sent to the army hospitals, for the sick and 
wounded, boxes and barrels of lint, bandages, clothing, and 
bed clothes." 

Westfield. — Incorporated May 19, 1669. Population in 
1860, 5,055 ; in 1865, 5,634. Valuation in 1860, $2,801,834 ; 
in 1865, $3,244,600. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Leroy C. Gillett, Hiram Hall, 
Seth Bush ; in 1862, Leroy C. Gillett, Reuben Loomis, Wil- 
liam Provin ; in 1863, William Provin, Leroy C. Gillett, 
L. F. Thayer ; in 1864 and 1865, L. F- Thayer, L. F. Root, 
William Provin. 

The town-clerk during all these years was P. H. Boise. 
The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was L. R. Norton; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, Henry Loomis. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 29th of April ; at which 
the following resolutions were read and adopted : — 

Resolved, That it is incumbent on all citizens, by every considera- 
tion of interest and of duly to show their patriotic sentiments by 
word and -act, in order to make known the opinions of the great 
body of the people, and bring the present unhappy contest to a speedy 
end. 

Resolved, That the blessings and the memories of our National 
Union are too great and too precious to be abandoned, its flag too 
grand to be tarnished ; and we pledge our unalterable attachment to 
the nation, the Union, and the flag, and our unqualified support of 
their representatives and constituted authorities. 

Resolved, That we hail with delight the evidence, in the conduct of 
her government, her people, and her soldiers, that the Massachusetts 
of to-day is not inferior to the Massachusetts of her forefathers ; and 
that no efforts, nor sacrifices of ours shall be wanting to maintain her 
in the place where she stood, as she stood long ago, — First in the 
Field. 

Ten thousand dollars were appropriated to purchase outfits 
and equipments for volunteers, and to pay such while drilling 
the same pay as is received by soldiers in tlie service of the 



324 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

United States, and to properly provide for tlieir families while 
absent in the service. 

18<)2. At a meeting held on the 19th of July, it was voted 
to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who 
shall enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the 
town, and to raii«e seven thousand five hundred dollars to pay 
the same. A series of patriotic resolutions was read and 
adopted : first, congratulating the town for its liberality in 
furnishing money and men for the war; second, thanking the 
noble-hearted citizens of the town who had entered the military 
service. The third we give entire : — 

Hesnlved, That the volunteers who have heretofore gone out from 
us, and who have stood so undaunted in tho shock of battle, bravest 
among the brave, so as to receive as they richly deserved the esi)ecial 
thanks of their commanding oilicer, commend themselves to our affec- 
tion and admiration for the exhibition in so remarkable a degree of 
those noble qualities which go to make up the true soldier ; and 
while we deeply condole with the friends of the fallen, we send greet- 
ing to their living comrades in arms. Well done, brave men ! your 
fellow - townsmen are proud of )rour fame, and grateful for your 
sacrifices. 

Another meeting was held on the 18th of August, when it 
was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each vol- 
unteer for nine months' service when cre<lited to the quota of 
West field, and ten thousand dollars were appropriated to pay 
the same. 

1803. There does not appear to have been any action taken 
by tiie town in regard to the war during this year, although 
recruiting volunteers and the payment of State aid to their fam- 
ilies were continued. 

1804. On the 4th of April it was voted to raise three 
thousand dollars to reimburse those citizens who had volun- 
tarily contributed of their means to fill the quota of the town. 
Another meeting was held on the Oth of July, at which it was 
voted to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to 
each volunteer who should enlist for three years and be credited 
to the quota ; also fifty dollars to each of the veterans of West- 
field who had re-enlisted in the service. 



WEST BPRINOFIELD. 325 

1805. On the 6th of May the town voted to raise twenty 
thousand dollars to reimburse citizens for money which they 
had paid to aid the town in filling its quota. 

Westfield furnished six hundred and thirty-one men for the 
war, which was a surplus of fifty- three over and above all de- 
mands. Twenty-eight were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was seventy-six 
thousand four hundred and eighty-three dollars ($76,483.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to the soldiers' families, and 
which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $1,636.72; in 1862, $5,935.32; in 1863, 
$9,806.74; in 1864, $60,000.00; in 1865, $7,400.00. Total 
amount, $34,278.88. 

West Springfield. — Incorporated Feb. 23, 1774. Popu- 
lation in 1860, 2,105; in 1865, 2,100. Valuation in 1860, 
$1,011,772; in 1865, $1,319,550. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Nathan Loomis, 
Alvin Sibley, F. F. French; in 1863, Aaron Bagg, Charles 
C. Smith, Lucius Dwinnell ; in 1864 and 1865, Albert D. 
Bagg, Carlos W. Hoisington, Aaron L. Hayes. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during the years 1861 
and 1862 was Charles White ; in 1863, Edward Parsons ; in 
1864 and 1865, J. M. Harmon. 

1861. A legal town-meeting was held April 30th, at which 
it was voted to borrow a sum not exceeding ten thousand dol- 
lars, in aid of volunteers belonging to the town. William 
Melcher, J. O. Moseley, Reuben Champion, Aaron Bagg, 
Julius Day, Edwaixi Parsons, and Henry Dickinson were 
chosen a Finance Committee, who were authorized to aid the 
families of the soldiers, and to furnish each soldier with a 
revolver. June 4th, The vote to furnish revolvers was recon- 
sidered. July 19th, The finance committee were instructed to 
pay each volunteer from that town a bounty of one hundred 
dollars, and it was voted that such volunteer " be exempt from 
taxation for war purposes." 



326 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1862. August 15th, Voted, that each person who volun- 
teers to the credit of the town, "before Monday next, be paid 
a bounty of one hundred and ten dollars," after that time a 
bounty of one hundred only. December Ist, The treasurer 
was authorized to borrow two thousand dollars, and the finance 
committee were directed to enlist men for nine months' service 
wherever they could get them, to fill the urgent demand made 
by the Government. 

1863. April 6th, The town appropriated four thousand 
dollars " out of which soldiers' families shall be paid for the 
ensuing year ; " and " that the widows of those who have died 
in the service shall receive the same aid as before ; " '* that each 
soldier who enlisted in the Tenth Regiment, for whom a revolver 
was bought, and who did not receive it, shall receive an equiva- 
lent in money ; and, if deceased, the amount shall be paid to 
his heirs ; " and three hundred dollars were appropriated for 
this purpose. 

1864. April 6th, Voted, to reimburse all money paid by 
individuals for bounty purposes, and to pay a bounty of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars to any volunteer or drafted 
man who shall enter the military service from March 1, 1864, 
to March 1, 1865. August 2d, The treasurer was directed to 
pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each 
person who furnished a substitute. C. AV. Hoisington, A. D. 
Bagg, A. L. Hayes, J. L. Worthy, and Ethan Brooks were 
chosen " a committee of ways and means " to fill the quota of 
the town. 

1865. May 10th, Voted, to refund to drafted men three 
hundred dollars commutation-money which each had paid ; also, 
to refund to each person the amount he had advanced for 
recruiting purposes. 

West Springfield furnished two hundred and twenty-eight 
men for the war, which was a surplus of twenty-four over 
and above all demands. Six were commissioned officers. The 
amount of money raised and expended by the town by reason 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-five thousand 
four hundred and eighty-six dollars and seventy-six cents 
($35,486.76). This was exclusive of other expenditures made 



WILBRAHAM. 327 

by individuals. The aggregate amount of money furnished by 
the town, in its corporate capacity, and by citizens by volun- 
tary contributions, was more than fifty thousand dollars. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the ])ayment of State aid to soldiers' families during the war, 
and which was refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $528.10; in 1862, $2,549.40; in 1863, $3,719.03; 
in 1864, $3,380.25; in 1865, $2,100.00. Total amount, 
$12,276.78. 

WiLBRAHAM. — Incorporated June 15, 1763. Population in 
1860, 2,081 ; in 1865, 2,111. Valuation in 1861, $841,633; 
in 1865, $872,100. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Philip P. Potter, William V. 
Sessions, Horace Clark ; in 1862, Horace Clark, Marcus Beebe, 
Hiram Hendrick ; in 1863, Horace Clark, Porter Cross, Wal- 
ter Hitchcock ; in 1864, John Baldwin, Horace Clark, Sumner 
Smith; in 1865, John Baldwin, Sumner Smith, William V. 
Sessions. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was 
Howard Stanton ; * in 1863 and 1864, John M. Merrick ; in 
1865, Gilbert Roewood. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 27th of May ; at which it 
was voted to pay State aid to the families of soldiers living in 
Wilbraham, as provided by law. 

1862. April 7th, The town-treasurer was authorized to 
borrow money in aid of the families of volunteers. July 26th, 
The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer for three years' service, when mustered 
in and credited to the quota of the town, the number not to 
exceed twenty. The treasurer was authorized to borrow two 
thousand dollars for the payment of said bounties. The town- 
clerk was directed to keep a record of the names of residents 
of Wilbraham who have served or shall serve in the armies of the 



* Howard Stanton died in office during the year, and his father, James, was 
appointed to fill the vacancy. 



328 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

United States. August 28th, ^ Voted, that the town use its 
best endeavors to obtain soldiers without drafting." Voted, to 
pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each 
volunteer for nine months* service, when mustered in and credited 
to the town. On the 23d of September this bounty was in- 
creased to two hundred dollars, and the treasurer was authorized 
to borrow money to pay the same. 

1863. April 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money to pay State aid to the families of soldiers living in that 
town, "provided that the funds of the town are not sufficient 
for the same." 

1864. July 28th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, 
not exceeding eight thousand dollars, " to be called a recruiting 
fund," and to be used to procure men to fill the quota of the 
town under the recent call of the President for more men, it 
having been reported that some of the men who had enlisted 
from Wilbraham had been credited to other towns. Porter 
Cross and Sumner Smith were chosen " to investigate the mat- 
ter at Boston," and have the rolls there corrected. 

1865. January 16th, The treasurer was directed to borrow 
five thousand dollars as a recruiting fund to be used by the 
selectmen in procuring volunteers to the credit of the town. 
The following resolve was passed : — 

Resolved^ That a vote of thanks be tendered to General B. F. 
Butler for his services in the United- States military department during 
the present civil war. 

Wilbraham furnished two hundred and twenty-three men for 
the war, which was a surplus of twenty-six over and above all 
demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirteen thousand two 
hundred and fifty-five dollars ($13,255.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during the war, and which was 
repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, 
$209.82; in 1862, $2,356.14; in 1863, $3,163.00; in 1864, 
$3,377.14; in 1865, $1,700.00. Total amount, $10,806.10. 



WILBRAHAM. 329 

The ladies of Wilbraham contributed liberally of their time 
and means to the comfort of our soldiers. One lady " made 
two feather-beds into pillows for them." The contributions 
were forwarded chiefly through the Sanitary and Christian 
Commissions. 




CHAPTER IX. 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 

This county is bounded south by Hampden, west by Berk- 
shire, north by Franklin, and east by Worcester Counties. It 
is located in the centre of the alluvial basin of the Connecticut 
River ; it has a rich soil and considerable water power, much of 
which is used for manufacturing purposes ; it is also well pro- 
vided with railroad accommodations. The county is divided into 
twenty- three towns, the largest and most important of which is 
Northampton, the county seat. The value of its agricultural 
and manufacturing products in 1865 was $13,143,i^57. The 
population in 1860 was 37,822; in 1865 it was 39,199, an 
increase in five years of 1377 ; the population in 1870 was 
44,388, which is a gain of 5,189. The valuation of the county 
in 1860 was $17,737,649; in 1865 it was $20,510,994, an 
increase in five years of $2,773,345. 

The number of men furnished by the several towns in the 
county, according to the returns made by the selectmen in 1866, 
was three thousand seven hundred and ninety-three (3,793), 
which is very near the exact number. Each town furnished its 
full contingent upon every call made by the President for men, 
and at the end of the war had a surplus over and above all de- 
mands, which in the aggregate amounted to three hundred and 
forty-four men (344). The total amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the several towns on account of the 
war, exclusive of State aid, was four hundred and fifteen thou- 
sand and forty-two dollars and seventy-six cents ($415,042.76) . 
The total amount raised and expended during the war for State 
aid to soldiers' families, and which was afterwards repaid by 



AMHERST. 331 

the Commonwealth, was one hundred and eighty-four thousand 
and seventy-five dollars and seven cents ($184,075.07), making 
the total expenditure $599,117.83. 

The following is the war record of the various towns : — 

Amherst. — Incorporated Feb. 13, 1759. Population in 
1860, 3,206 ; in 1805, 3,413. Valuation in 1860, $1,581,521 ; 
in 1865, $1,860,457. The selectmen in 1861 were Ezra 
Ingram, Eleazor Kellogg, H. Poraroy ; in 1862 and 1863, 
Ezra Ingram, Eleazor Kellogg, Daniel Converse ; in 1864, 
Ezra Ingram, Eleazor Kellogg, Avery R. Cushman; in 1865, 
Ezra Ingram, Eleazor Kellogg, Porter Dickinson. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was 
Samuel C. Carter. 

1861. May 1st, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
not exceeding five thousand dollars to be applied to the purchase 
of outfits for volunteers, their comfort while in the military ser- 
vice, and the maintenance and support of their families at 
home. 

1862. July 21st, Voted, to pay one hundred dollars bounty 
to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years in the military 
service and be mustered in to the credit of the town. Voted, 
That it is the wish of the citizens that volunteers enlisting from 
Amherst "associate with the volunteers from Hadlev, Hatfield, 
Leverett, Pelham, Sunderland, and Granby, in forming a com- 
pany." August 25th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who enlists in the nine-months service, 
and is credited to Amherst, " provided that the whole number 
required for this town shall be enlisted before the first day of 
September." "Voted, that the first names on the enlisting 
rolls shall have the first preference to go into the armyJ*^ * 
October 11th, The selectmen were authorized "to make an ar- 
rangement with any other city or town for our surplus of 
enlisted men, reserving to the town the benefit of such surplus 
in {I future call of the President." 

* This vote was passed after the enlisting committee had reported that 
more than sixty men had offered themselves, and that the volunteers would 
far exceed the number required. 



332 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town in 
its corporate capacity during this year, in relation to the war. 

1864. May 24th, Voted, To assess nine thousand five hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars ; of which two thousand dollars is 
to refund to the volunteer fund what was paid in October, 1863, 
twelve hundred dollars to fill a deficiency in the quota of the 
town, and sixty-five hundred to pay bounties to volunteers who 
shall enlist to the quota of the town during the year ending 
March 1, 1865. 

Amherst furnished three hundred and thirty-two men for the 
war,* which was a surplus of twenty-nine over and above all 
demands. Twenty were commissioned oflficers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town for 
war purposes, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-nine thousand 
five hundred and thirty-five dollars and forty-seven cents ($29,- 
535.47). In addition to this sum $23,779.50 were contributed 
by individuals, and received from fairs held by the patriotic 
ladies of Amherst for the benefit of the soldiers. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to the soldiers' families and which was 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $672.71; in 1862, $2,995.34; in 1863, $4,612.51; in 

1864, $4,810.31; in 1865, $2,676.89. Total amount, $15,- 
769.76. 

Belchertown. — Incorporated June 30, 1761. Population 
in 1860, 2,709 ; in 1865, 2,636. Valuation in 1860, $1,063,- 
603; in 1865, $1,108,591. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Joshua G. Longley, 
Martin Sedgewick, Henry J. Chandler; in 1863, Leonard 
Barrett, Wright Barrett, Joshua G. Longley ; in 1864 and 

1865, Joshua G. Longley, A. Ralph Owen, Henry J. 
Chandler. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years 
was Edwin R. Bridgeman. 



* The town authorities claim to have furnished three hundred and forty- 
five men for the war, of whom twenty-one were in the navy. 



BELCHERTOWN. 333 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters in 
relation to the war was held on the 30th of April, at which 
it was voted to uniform and clothe, *' from head to foot, all 
who volunteer in the Belchertown company, and to furnish a 
revolver to each of them who go into active service." It was 
also voted to hire a competent drill-master, and to pay each 
man for the time spent in drilling ; also to pay each volunteer's 
family ten dollars a month while he is in active service.* 
The selectmen were authorized to borrow five thousand dollars 
to carry out the purposes of these votes. July 6th, Tiie act 
of the Legislature in relation to the payment of State aid to the 
families of soldiers was adopted by the town. ' 

1862. July 21st, "Voted, to pay one hundred dollars to 
each recruit to the number of thirty-four, and that the assessors 
levy a tax upon the valuation of last May, and collect it within 
twenty days." Voted, " that the treasurer go to the camp with 
the soldier, and pay one hundred dollars to each upon his 
being mustered into service." August 22d, A bounty of one 
hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to each volunteer for 
nine months' service, and a committee was appointed " to can- 
vass the town to procure men to fill our quota." 

1863. February 10th, The selectmen were authorized "to 
procure upon the best possible terms eighteen men to fill the 
quota of the town for the last call of the Government." The 
treasurer was authorized to borrow the money for that purpose. 
September 23d, Voted, "that in all cases when necessary the 
selectmen may furnish supplies to families of volunteers in 
addition to State aid." 

1864. June 23d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
not exceeding ten thousand dollars to procure volunteers to 
relieve citizens who had been drafted or who might thereafter be ; 
and to those citizens who were drafted, and had procured sub- 
stitutes or had paid commutation, there be paid the sura of 
three hundred dollars ; and for this purpose the selectmen and 
treasurer were directed to borrow thirty-six hundred dollars. f 

* The ladies of Belchertown made shirts and drawers for a company of sixty 
men at this time. 

t This amount was borrowed on the personal notes of the selectmen and 



334 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

June 30th, Voted, to raise a sum of money sufficient to procure 
forty volunteers. 

1865. January 2d, Voted to raise twenty-five hundred 
dollars " to procure recruits on the last call of the President for 
three hundred thousand men." 

Belchertown furnished two hundred and eighty men for the 
war, which was a surplus of twenty over and above all demands. 
Nine were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was twenty-nine thousand dollars 
($29,000.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the to^vn 
during the war, for the payment of State aid to the soldiers' 
families, and which was afterwards reimbursed by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows : In 1861, $484.01 ; in 1862, $3,137.93; 
in 1863, $3,901.81; in 1864, $3,834.27 ; in 1865, $2,218.47. 
Total amount, $13,576.49. 

Chesterfield. — Incorporated June 11, 1762. Population 
in 1860, 897; in 1865, 802. Valuation in 1860, $415,746; in 
1865, $372,790. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Eli A. Sylvester, 
Loren L. Tower, Samuel House; in 1863, Patrick Bryant, 
Samuel House, Chauncy Witherell ; in 1864, Patrick Bryant, 
Ebenezer Edwards, Chauncy Witherell ; in 1865, Patrick 
Bryant, Samuel House, Chauncy Witherell. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the 
war was Albert Nichols. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town in 
its corporate capacity during this year in relation to the war. 

1862. At a special town-meeting held on the 5th of August, 
it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each 
volunteer who would enlist either for three years or nine months, 
when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. The 
selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 

treasurer, on a guarantee to them signed by about three hundred voters of 
the town ; on the 20th of May, 1865, the town assumed the liabilities incurred by 
the selectmen and treasurer. 



CUMMINGTON. 335 

1863. At a meeting held on the 17th of January, Samuel 
House, one of the selectmen, was appointed to visit Boston and 
obtain information in regard to the number of men the town 
was to furnish to complete its quota. 

1864. On the 2d of April the town voted to pay a bounty 
of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who 
shall enlist and be credited to the town ; also to raise eight hun- 
dred and seventy-five dollars to repay citizens money which they 
had advanced for recruiting purposes. This bounty was con- 
tinued to be paid until the end of the war. 

1865. At a meeting held on the 22d of May, it was voted 
to raise by taxation six thousand seven hundred and sixty-nine 
dollars to pay citizens money which they had advanced for 
recruiting purposes, " one half to be assessed this year, and the 
balance next year." 

Chesterfield furnished ninety-five men for the war, which was 
a surplus of ten over and above all demands. Two were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was fourteen thousand six hundred and sixty-two 
dollars ($14,662.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town, 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
afterwiirds repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $36.30; in 1862, $644.30; in 1863, $1,689.21 ; in 1864, 
$1,477.70; in 1865, $1,165.50. Total amount, $5,013.01. 

The ladies of Chesterfield contributed three hundred and 
seventy-five dollars in money, besides clothing and valuable 
work for the soldiers. 

CuMMiNGTON. — Incorporated June 23, 1779. Population 
in 1860, 1,085 ; in 1865, 980. Valuation in 1860, $354,219 ; 
in 1865, $342,842. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Nathan Orcutt, William H. 
Mitchell, Charles Harlow; in 1862, Nathan Orcutt, John C. 
Reed, Charles Harlow; in 1863 and 1864, N. F. Orcutt, 
Charles Harlow, John C. Reed; in 1865, L. J. Orcutt, L. E. 
Dawes, CM. Tillson. 



336 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The town-clerk during all these years was Alraon Mitchell. 
The town-treasurer during the same period was William 
Packard. 

1861. The first town-meeting at which action was taken in 
regard to the war was held August 31st, which voted to raise 
five hundred dollars "in aid of families of such citizens as had or 
miffht hereafter volunteer in the United-States service." 

1862. A meeting was held July 28th, at which it was voted 
to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer to fill 
the quota of the town, the number required being fourteen. 

Almon Mitchell who had been town-clerk since 1855, and all 
through the war, writes, " that the above were the first actions 
of the town after the war commenced. We had many subse- 
quent meetings at which various appropriations were made. 
There was no unusual incident in our community during the 
war. I believe we may claim a full average share of public 
spirit and patriotism, and if there were any persons who began 
to grow faint-hearted, when our prospects were gloomiest, they 
had the grace to keep silent." 

Cummington furnished one hundred and five men for the war, 
which was a surplus of eight over all demands. Five were 
commissioned oflScers. The amount of money appropriated and 
expended on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was 
ten thousand five hundred and eighty-nine dollars and thirty- 
four cents, $10,589.34. 

The amount of money raised and expended for State aid to 
the families of the soldiers during the war, and which was after- 
wards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, 00; in 1862, $777.95; in 1863, $2,019.17; in 1864, 
$1,034.95 ; in 1865, $1,000.00. Total amount, $4,832.07. 

Eastiiampton. — Incorporated June 17, 1785. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 1,916; in 1865, 2,869. Valuation in 1860, 
$924,567; in 1865, $1,700,599. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Levi Parsons, Lewis S. Clark, 
Alanson Clark ; in 1862, Seth Warner, Lewis S. Clark, Alan- 
son Clark ; in 1863, Lawrence D. Lyman, Seth Warner, E. 
S. Jones ; in 1864, Eli A. Hubbard, Edwin S. Jones, Law- 




EA8THAMPTON. 337 

rence D. Lyman; in 1865, Edwin S. Janes, Lewis S. Clark, 
Joel Basset t. 

The town-clerk in the years 1861, 1862, and 1863, was 
Lucius Preston ; in 1864, George S. Clark ; in 1865, Charles 
B. Johnson. The town- treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, 
was Ambrose Stone; in 1864 and 1865, Levi Parsons. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 30th of April, at which 
the following preamble and resolution were adopted : — 

Whereas a large portion of the citizens of the United States are in 
open rebellion against the Government of the same, and the President 
of the United States has by proclamation called for a large force of 
volunteer soldiers to defend and vindicate the Government, and there 
is a strong probability of a still larger force being soon called for ; and 
as we deem it to be the privilege as well as the duty of every good 
citizen and lover of his country to contribute in some way towards 
supporting the Government from which he receives protection : there- 
fore, in order to encourage the citizens of this town to volunteer their 
services in defence of our General Government, be it 

Resolved^ That the town appropriate fi^t thousand dollars for the 
purpose of equipping such volunteers as may be called into service, 
and for the relief of families and relatives dependent upon them for 
snpport. 

November 5th, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of 
volunteers as provided by law. 

1862. August 11th, Voted, that the town pay the sum of 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each of the twenty-one 
volunteers, or to any portion of them, who have enlisted from this 
town, and shall be received into the service of the United States 
under the last call of the President. Voted, to pay fifty dol- 
lars to each volunteer who enlists for nine months when mus- 
tered in and credited to the quota of the town, "and in case 
after the nine months' service they enlist for three years or the 
war they shall receive seventy-five dollars additional." Au- 
gust 27th,. Voted, ''that seventy-five dollars in addition to the 
fifty dollars voted on the eleventh instant be paid volunteers for 
nine months." 

1863. August 17th, The families of drafted men were put 

22 



338 MASSACHUSETTS IX THE REBELLION. 

on the same footing as regards State aid as the families of vol- 
unteers. 

1864. August 20th, Voted, " to raise and appropriate one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars each for thirty-four men to 
complete the town's quota, and that it be paid in gold or its 
equivalent." 

Easthampton furnished two hundred men for the war, 
which was a surplus of eighteen over and above all demands. 
Five were commissioned officers.* The whole amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty thousand three hun- 
dred and sixty-seven dollars ($30,367.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which 
was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $256.40; in 1862, $1,600.05; in 1863, $1,847.34; 
in 1864, $1,601.24; in 1865, $1,400.00. Total amount, 
$6,705.03. 

The sympathies of the ladies of Easthampton were early in 
the war enlisted in favor of the soldiers. "Individuals, neigh- 
borhoods, sewing societies, and town societies, one and all were 
engaged in the work of providing comforts for the absent." 
The children of the Sunday schools also gave liberally of their 
small means for the same purpose. It appears from the brief 
records of one ladies' society, called "The Society to Aid the 
Sick and Wounded Soldiers," that as early as 1861 a box 
valued with its contents at one hundred and fifty dollars was 
sent to the sick and wounded in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1863 
contributions were taken up in the churches, and there was 
" received from girls in the factories " upwards of two hundred 
dollars, which were expended in purchasing materials to make 
into clothing, that filled four large boxes. The same year 



♦ Major George C. Strong, U. S. A., and Major-Gencral of Volunteers, wlio 
was killed in the attack upon Fort Wagner, South Carolina, Feb. 18G3, was a 
native of Easthampton. His name with other of Easthampton men. who fell 
in the war, is inscribed on a marble tablet " in the Soldiers' Memorial Tower " 
of tlie splendid town hall, erected in 1868-6U at a cost of sixty-five thousand 
dollars. 



ENFIELD. 339 

the ladies sent to the "contrabands" two barrels of second- 
hand clothing. The money value of these shipments was at 
least six hundred dollars. In 1864, the same society sent 
through the Christian Contmission nine boxes filled with under 
garments and other contributions ; one large box was also sent to 
the freedmen, and one to the Union refugees in Cairo, Illinois. 
The value of these contributions was at least one thousand dol- 
lars. In 1865, two boxes containing contributions valued at 
two hundred dollars were sent to the front early in the spring. 
Contributions were taken up from time to time in each of the 
churches and Sabbath schools, but it is not in our power to 
give the exact amounts obtained. The Sabbath school of the 
First Congregational Church, it is estimated, gave during the 
war in cash and books for the soldiers to the value of one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars. Touching and appropriate resolutions 
were passed by them on the occasion of their superintendent, 
Edmund W. Clark, "exchanging these peaceful scenes for the 
dangers of the battle-field." 

Enfield. — Incorporated Feb. 16, 1816. Population in 
1860, 1,025; in 1865, 999. Valuation in I860; $583,850; 
in 1865, $610,644. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Micah H. Gross, D. Allen, 
H. M. Potter; in 1862 and 1863, Ezra Cary, Daniel B. Gil- 
lett, Edward Cary; in 1864 and 1865, Cyrus F. Woods, 
Micah H. Gross, Henry M. Smith. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all of these years 
was Joseph S. Jones. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters in 
relation to the war, was held on the 6th of May, at which the 
following preamble and resolutions were adopted : — 

Whereas a large section of our country with arms in their hands are 
now in open rebellion, for the overthrow of our Government, and the 
destruction of our free institutions ; therefore. 

Resolved^ That we as true and loyal citizens are bound to respond 
to the call of our country, and rally to its support, by furnishing men 
and money in its defence. 

Resolved^ That a committee of five be appointed consisting of Ezra 




340 BIA88ACHU8ETT8 IN THE REBELLION. 

Cary, Augustus Moody, N. W. Aldrich, Joseph Root, and D. B. Gil- 
lett, to be called the Executive Committee of the town, whose duty it 
shall be to receive and disburse all moneys given by individuals and 
assessed by the town for the purpose of raising men and furnishing 
them for the army, and providing for their families during their 
absence, and for any other purpose they may deem necessary in order 
to carry out the spirit of the preamble and resolutions. 

The town voted to assess a tax of two thousand dollars at 
once, to be paid in instalments to the Executive Committee as 
they might require it. September 9th, A bounty of thirty dol- 
lars was authorized to be paid to each volunteer who should 
enlist for three years, and be mustered in to the credit of the 
town ; and the selectmen were authorized to draw warrants upon 
the treasurer in favor of the Executive Committee to pay the 
same. 

1862. July 26th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to ejich of twelve volunteers who shall enlist for three 
years and be mustered in to fill the quota of the town. August 
3d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to 
each nine-months volunteer to fill the quota of the town. The 
selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay these boun- 
ties. 

1863. January 1st, The selectmen were authorized to fill 
the quota called for under the last call of the President, and to 
pay such bounties as might be necessary to procure the men. 

1864. June 8th, Voted, that a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dolLirs be paid to all volunteers who shall enlist 
and be credited to the town during the year. 

Enfield furnished about one hundred and seven men for the 
war, which was a surplus of nine over and above all demands. 
Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was thirteen thousand eight hundred and 
one dollars and four cents ($13,801.04). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $188.45; in 1862, $1,012.13; in 1863, $1,466.80; 



GOSHEN. 341 

in 1864, $1,335.83; in 1865, $561.00. Total amount, 
$4,564.21. 

Goshen. — Incorporated May 14, 1781. Population in 
1860, 439; in 1865, 412. Valuation in 1860, $157,942; in 
1865, $152,796. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Hiram Barrus, C. A. Packard, 
C. C. Dresser ; in 1862, C. A. Packard, C. C. Dresser, Alonzo 
Shaw ; in 1863, C. A. Packard, C. C. Dresser, George Dresser ; 
in 1864, C. A. Packard, Alonzo Shaw, George Dresser; in 
1865, C. A. Packard, Alvan Barrus, Joshua Knowlton. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was Benjamin White ; in 1862, 
Alvan Barrus was elected and served until August 5th, when 
he enlisted and went to the war ; Benjamin White was ap- 
pointed to fill the vacancy ; in 1863, Benjamin White ; in 
1864 and 1865, Joshua Knowlton. The town-treasurer in 
1861 was Timothy P. Lyman; in 1862 and 1863, Henry 
H. Tilton ; in 1864 and 1865, Joshua Knowlton. 

1861. The first legal town- meeting, to consider questions 
relating to the war, was held on the 6th of May, at which it 
was voted to appropriate two hundred dollars to be expended 
in recruiting volunteers ; and C. A. Packard, H. H. Tilton, 
Hiram Packard, Daniel Williams, and Francis Jepson "were 
chosen a committee to attend to the same." November 5th, 
Voted, to furnish aid to the families of those citizens of the 
town who have enlisted, or may hereafter enlist, in the military 
service of their country, and the selectmen were authorized to 
borrow **sucli sums of money as will be necessary for this 
purpose." 

1862. September 3d, The selectmen were authorized to 
pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who has 
enlisted, or shall hereafter enlist, to the credit of the town, 
either for three years or nine months' service, and to borrow 
money to pay the same. 

1863. January 19th, Voted, to instruct C. A. Packard to 
borrow eleven hundred and forty dollars to pay bounties to vol- 
unteers. March 2d, Voted, to use one thousand dollars of the 




342 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

*' James Fund" to pay bounties to volunteers.* April 6th, 
The selectmen were directed to borrow three hundred dollars to 
pay aid to the soldiers' families. 

1864. April 4th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
whatever sums of money were necessary to pay State aid to the 
soldiers' families during the year, and to pay a bounty of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to 
the credit of the town under the last two calls of the President 
for men. June 15th, Voted, to raise one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars for each volunteer " to fill our quota under all further 
calls up to March 1, 1865." 

1865. May 2 2d, Voted, to assess one-third of the amount 
of $3,049.75, "it being the amount raised for the purpose of 
reimbursing money borrowed, and to borrow the other two- 
thirds." 

Goshen furnished forty-seven men for the war, which was a 
surplus of six over and above all demands. None were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expendecl by the town for war purposes, exclusive of State 
aid, was three thousand three hundred and seventy-four dollars 
and fifty cents ($3,374.50). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and 
which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $41.92; in 1862, $573.57; in 1863, 
$768.60 ; in 1864, $638.88 ; in 1865, $155.45. Total amount, 
$2,178.42. 

Granby. — Incorporated June 11, 1768. Population in 
1860, 907 ; in 1865, 908. Valuation in 1860, $476,382 ; in 
1865, $470,125. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Andrew White, Park Warner, 
Phineas D. Barton; in 1862, Andrew White, William W. 
Ferry, Simeon C. Stebbins; in 1863, Simeon C. Stebbins, 
Francis E. Taylor, James M. Barton ; in 1864, Andrew 

* This was a local fund left with curious requirements to the town bj a per- 
son by the name of James. 



GREENWICH. 343 

White, C. C. Aldrich, Charles F. Clark; in 1865, Andrew 
White, James M. Barton, Frederick Taylor. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was Philo Chapin. 

1861. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate capacity, during this year in regard to the war. 

1862. July 16th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer for three years, who shall enlist and 
be credited to the quota of the town ; and on the 22d of 
August the same bounty was directed to be paid to volunteers 
for nine months* service. 

1864. August 3d, The bounty to be paid to volunteers for 
three years' service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars. 

Granby furnished one hundred and twelve men for the war, 
which was a surplus of eight over and above all demands. 
Eight were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was ten thousand nine hundred and 
forty-six dollars and eighty-six cents ($10,946.86). 

The amount of money raised and expended during the 
war for the payment of State aid to the families of soldiers, 
and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, 00; in 1862, $678.46; in 1863, 
$1,156.94; in 1864, $638.88; in 1865, $155.45. Total 
amount, $2,178.42. 

The ladies of Granby were very active, doing every thing in 
their power for the health and comfort of the soldiers. Several 
barrels of clothing and sanitary stores were prepared by them 
and forwarded to the army. 

Greenwich. — Incorporated April 20, 1754. Population 
in 1860, 699; in 1865, 647. Valuation in 1860, $268,824; 
in 1865, $261,416. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Thomas S. Gilmore, Jonathan 
W. Goodell, Lynus Tourtelott; in 1862, Zebe Snow, Albert 
L. Doak, Luther D. Fuller; in 1863, John T. Warner, Luke 
Earle, Luther D. Fuller; in 1864, John T. Warner, Marvin 



344 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Bond, Lynus Tourtelott ; in 1865, Calvin W. Richards, Marvin 
Bond, Lynus Tourtelott. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Jonathan 
P. Smith. The town-treasurer during the same period was 
John T. Warner. 

18G1. No action appears to have been taken by the town, 
in its corporate capacity, during this year. 

1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and 
be credited to the quota of the town. A paper was signed by 
the tax-payers to agree to have the bounty-money raised by a 
tax upon property. September 10th, Voted, to pay the same 
amount of bounty to volunteers for nine months' service. 

1863. April 6th, Voted, to comply with the requirements 
of the act " to provide for the reimbursements of bounties paid 
to volunteers ; " and the town-clerk was authorized to arrange 
and settle the matter with the treasurer of the Commonwealth. 

1864. August 18th, The selectmen were authorized to pay 
a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer enlisting for three years to the credit of the town, and to 
borrow twelve hundred dollars to pay the same. Several other 
meetings were held during the year and in the early part of 
1865, at which measures were taken to recruit volunteers and 
to fill the quota of the town. 

Greenwich furnished sixty-three men for the war, which was 
a surplus of two men over and above all demands. None were 
commissioned oflHcers. The total amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was six thousand eight hundred and ninety-three 
dollars and twenty-nine cents ($6,893.29). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war, for the payment of State aid to the families of 
soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows : In 1861, $70.17 ; in 1862, $677.48 ; 
in 1863, $1,034.00; in 1864, $818.43; in 1865, $428.83. 
Total amount, $3,033.91. 

" The ladies of Greenwich sent to the soldiers from time to 
time blankets and other articles needed for their comfort." 



HADLEY. 345 

Hadley. — Incorporated May 22, 1661. Population in 
1860,2,104; in 1865,2,246. Valuation in 1860, $1,249,679; 
in 1865, $1,279,320. 

The selectmen in 1861 were R. M. Montague, Enos E. 
Cook, Thomas Reynolds ; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, John S. 
Bell, L. N. Granger, J. S. Smith; in 1865, L. N. Granger, 
Francis Edson, Horace Cook. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the 
war was William S. Chipman. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to consider matters 
relating to the war was held on the third of May, at which it 
was — 

Resolved, That while we lament the necessity of the present war 
against the sister States of our Republic, we are fixed in the determina- 
tion by all the money and means in our power to support it until we 
obtain an honorable peace. 

It was then voted to raise fifteen hundred dollars to purchase 
uniforms for such volunteers as may enlist from Hadley, "either 
native or adopted citizens, for at least three months ; " also, 
fifteen hundred dollars to pay to each volunteer a sum sufficient 
to make his monthly pay twenty-six dollars a month while in 
actual service. June 8th, Voted, that each person ' who has 
enlisted in the military service from Hadley for three years shall 
be paid a bounty of fifty dollars. September 24th, This bounty 
was authorized to be paid to three-years volunteers until March 
1st, 1862. 

1862. August 22d, The selectmen were authorized to pay 
a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting for 
nine months to the credit of the town, and to borrow money 
to pay the same. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town 
during this year, although the payment of State aid to the 
families of soldiers, and the enlisting of volunteers were con- 
tinued. 

1864. August 6th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who has enlisted, or 
who may enlist " under the last call of the President for five 
hundred thousand men," and who shall be credited to the quota 



346 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

of Hadley. The treasurer was also directed to deposit a sum 
of money with the State Treasurer to pay a bounty of one hun- 
dred and twentv-five dollars for each recruit which the State 
might furnish. The selectmen were authorized to borrow four 
thousand two hundred and fifty dollars " to carry the above votes 
into effect." 

1865. May 4th, Voted, to raise six thousand six hundred 
dollars to reimburse those citizens of the town who voluntarily 
contributed tliat sum to pay bounties and encourage recruiting. 

Hadley furnished two hundred and twenty -four men for the 
war, which was a surplus of twenty-three over and above all 
demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town to 
carry on the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-seven 
thousand seven hundred dollars ($27,700.00). Many patri- 
otic citizens furnished money to aid recruiting, which was not 
refunded, and of which no record appears on the town books. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during tlie war for State aid to soldiers* families, and which 
was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 18()1, $168.41 ; in 1862, $1,235.60 ; in 1863, $2,455.82 ; 
in 1864, $2,713.57; in 1865, $1,805.16. Total amount, 
$8,378.56. 

" Much good work in behalf of the soldiers was done bv the 
ladies of Hadley." 

Hatfield. — Incorporated May 11, 1670. Population in 
1860, 1,337; in 1865, 1,405. Valuation in 1860, $1,071,- 
747; in 1865, $1,442,691. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Roswell Hubbard, Moses Mor- 
ton, Lemuel Cooley ; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, William 
H. Dickinson, R. H. Belden, J. T. Fitch. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was W. D. 
Billings. The town-treasurer during the same period was D. F. 
Wells. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters 
relating to the war was held on the 6th of May, at which Moses 
Morton, William H. Dickinson, George Waite, J. D. Billings, 



HATFIELD. 347 

George W. Hubbard, Eb'jah Bardwell, and Erastus Cowles, 
were authorized to borrow in behalf of the town not exceeding 
five thousand dollars, to be expended by them as they might 
deem expedient "on such soldiers from this town and their 
families as shall be mustered into the United-States service, 
during the continuance of the present war." It was also voted 
to furnish ejich volunteer with a uniform, if needed, and a suffi- 
cient amount of money to make his monthly pay twenty-six 
dollars. "Voted, that the town will provide liberally for the 
families of such as volunteer." — "After giving: three cheers for 
the star-spangled banner, the meeting adjourned for two weeks." 
May 20th, The committee were instructed to pay each volun- 
teer in the Tenth Regiment for time spent in drilling " as they 
shall deem just." 

1862. April 7th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers during the 
year. July 18th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years' mili- 
tary service, and be credited to the quota of the town ; and in 
case of the death or disability of any volunteer belonging to the 
town. State aid shall continue to be paid to his family, "until 
said family is able to support itself." The assessors were 
directed to abate the taxes of volunteers. August 25th, A 
bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to 
volunteers for nine months' service, until the quota of the town 
was filled ; the money to pay the same " to be assessed upon 
the polls and estates." 

1863. No action by the town appears to have been necessary 
in regard to military matters during this year. 

1864. April 4th, The bounty to each volunteer, " under the 
calls of the President of October, 1863, and February and 
March, 1864," was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 
Voted, "to refund to individuals the money contributed by them 
for recruiting purposes to fill said calls." The treasurer was 
authorized to borrow the money " in anticipation of the tax." 
A similar vote was passed on the 30th of July. 

1865. May 23d, Three thousand seven hundred and fifty- 
five dollars and fifty cents were appropriated to refund to indi- 



348 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

viduals money advanced by them for recruiting purposes during 
the past year, said money to be raised by taxation, one-half in 
1800, and one-half in 1867. The assessors were also requested 
to assess u|)on the polls and estates " a sum sufficient to pay 
each drafted man who furnished a substitute a sum not to 
exceed three hundred dollars, said tax-list to be delivered to the 
collector without a warrant," and the money so collected to be 
paid jiro rata to those entitled to it. 

Hatfield furnished one hundred and forty-six men for the war, 
which was a surplus of seven over and above all demands. 
Two were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was fourteen thousand nine hundred and 
ninety-four dollars and seventy-one cents ($14,994.71). 

The amount of money raised and expended by tlie town during 
the war for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families, and 
which was afterwards repaid by the Connnon wealth, was as 
' follows: In 18G1, $154.55; in 18()2, $1,291.00; in 1863, 
$2,406.27; in 1864, $2,026.82; in 1865, ?«00.00. Total 
amount, $6,678.64. 

The ladies of Hatfield sent to the soldiers and to the hospitals 
during the war articles of various kinds to the money value of 
three thousand dollars ; and the citizens generally collected and 
sent to the Christian Commission one thousand dollars. 

Huntington. — Incorporated June 29, 1773. Population in 
1860, 1,216; in 1865, 1,163. Valuation in 1860, $442,651; 
in 1865, $409,395. 

The selectmen during the years 1861 and 1862 were Charles 
H. Kirkland, Gilbert S. Lewis, William P. Miller; in 1863, 
Daniel Fry, Jairius J. Lyman, E. B. Tinker; in 1864 and 
1865, John Parks, Jairius J. Lyman, Charles H. Kirkland. 

The town-clerk during 1861 and 1862 was A. J. Stanton ; 
in 1863, 1864, and 1865, E. N. Woods. The town-treasurer 
in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Daniel Fry ; in 1864 and 1865, 
Jabez Stanton. 

1861. A special town-meeting was held in September, 
which voted to appropriate a sufficient sum to provide aid to 



I 

i 



HUNTINGTON. 349 

the farailies of volunteers in the military service from that town 
as provided by law. 

1862. July 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years to the 
credit of the town, and to raise eighteen hundred dollars to pay 
the same. August 23d, Voted, to pay the same bounty to men 
enlisting for nine months' service. 

1803. ^Nothing of special interest was acted upon in town- 
meeting in regard to military matters. 

1864. April 4th, The selectmen were authorized " to hire 
the number of men necessary to fill the quota of the town 
under the recent call of the President for two hundred thousand 
volunteers, and to pay each man a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars." June 6th, Gary Munson and E. W. 
Lathrop were appointed to procure volunteers to the credit of 
the town, to fill the present demand and all future demands 
which may be made upon it ; also, to pay a bounty of three 
hundred dollars to each citizen of the town who has been, or 
may be, drafted and mustered into the military service to fill 
the quota of the town. July 30th, Voted, to pay a bounty 
of fifty dollars to each volunteer for one year's service, eighty 
dollars to each for two years', and one hundred to each for three 
years' service. The treasurer was authorized to deposit five 
hundred dollars with the Treasurer of the Commonwejxlth to 
pay bounties for volunteers furnished by the State for the town. 
Voted, to raise two thousand dollars by subscription " in one 
week's time ; " also, to assess a tax of two thousand dollars, 
and to borrow one thousand dollars. 

1865. January 2d, The recruiting committee were directed 
to continue the enlistment of volunteers, and the treasurer was 
authorized to borrow, not exceeding two thousand dollars, for 
bounty purposes. May 24th, The town voted to pay back 
the money contributed by individuals for military purposes in 
1864. 

Huntington furnished one hundred and thirty-seven men for 
the war, which was a surplus of eight over all demands. Five 
were commissioned officers. The total amount of money appro- 




350 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

printed and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive 
of State aid, was twelve thousand dollars ($12,000.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended for State aid 
to soldiers' families during the war, and which was afterwards 
repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$229.09 ; in 1862, $2,227.12; in 1863, $3,248.99; in 1864, 
$3,112.71 ; in 1865, $1,550.00. Total amount, $10,368.51. 

MiDDLEFiELD. — Incorporated March 12, 1783. Population 
in 18G0, 748; in 1865, 723. Valuation in 1860, $308,332; 
in 1865, $351,881. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John L. Bell, Mor- 
gan Pease, Jacob Robbins ; in 1863, Matthew Smith, John 
W. Cross, Samuel Smith, Jr. ; in 1S64, John L. Bell, Mor- 
gan Pease, John W. Cross; in 1865, John L. Bell, Morgan 
Pease, E. J. Ingham. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Jonathan 
McElwain. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Oliver 
Church ; in 1863, 1864, and 1665, Solomon F. Root. 

A number of meetings called " war meetings " were held 
during the Rebellion, at which money was voted to procure 
volunteers to fill the several quotas assigned to Middlefield, and 
to provide for the comfortable support of the soldiers' families. 

Middlefield furnished eighty-six men for the war, which was 
a surplus of seven over and above all demands. Two were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town on account of the war 
was fourteen thousand four hundred and ninety dollars 
($14,490.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $146.74 ; in 1862, $536.62 ; in 1863, $902.80 ; in 1864, 
$260.00 ; in 1865, $111.00. Total amount, $1,957.76. 

The ladies of Middlefield " united in makincr clothin^: for 
the soldiers, and sent at one time a large box filled with various 
kinds of garments and other articles for their comfort, including 
domestic cordials." 



NORTHAMPTON. 351 

Northampton. — Incorporated Oct. 18, 1654. Population 
in 18()0, (;,788; in 18(55, 7,927. Valuation in 1860, $3,689,- 
965 ; in 1865, $4,789,965. 

The selectmen in 1861 were John B. Graves, Sylvester 
S. Wright, Haynes K. Starkweather, Jr., John F. Warner, 
Nathaniel Day; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, John B. 
Graves, John F. Warner, Nathaniel Day, Haynes K. Stark- 
weather, Jr., Emery B. Wells. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was A. Perry 
Peck. The town-treasurer during the same period was Ansel 
Wright. 

1861. The first legal town -meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 26th of April, at which 
the Hon. Erastus Hopkins offered the following preamble and 
resolutions, which were adopted : — 

Whereas the President of the United States has made a recent call 
upon various States for quotas of militia ; and whereas the militia of 
this town are liable under said call to be mustered by His Excellency 
the Governor of this Commonwealth into the service of the United 
States ; therefore, — 

Resolved^ That a special tax be, and hereby is, laid upon the inhabi- 
tants of this town to the amount of ten thousand dollars, for the benefit 
of the residents of this town who offer themselves, or who may be 
mustered into the service of the United States. 

June 17th, The selectmen were authorized to pay any de- 
mand, arising " from the equipment and support of the volun- 
teers sent from this town, which in their judgment constitutes 
an equitable charge against the town." * 

18()2. March 17th, The selectmen were authorized to bor- 
row whatever amount of money they should deem necessary 
to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. December 18th, 
Voted, to assume the sums advanced by individuals for bounties 
to volunteers. 

1863. March 16th, The selectmen were authorized to bor- 



* This lias reference to Company C, Tenth Regiment Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, recruited in Northampton, and which left the town for three years' active 
service on the 14th of June. 



352 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

row money for the payment of State aid to the families of 
volunteers. A vote of the same nature was passed each year 
of tlie war. 

1864. March 28th, The selectmen were authorized to bor- 
row ten thousand dollars for the payment of bounties to volun- 
teers. August 8th, The bounty to volunteers, enlisting for 
three years and credited to the quota of the town, was fixed at 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the 
end of the war. 

1865. May 8th, Voted, to raise thirty-three thousand dol- 
lars to refund to individuals the money voluntarily contributed 
by them to fill the quotas of the town under the several calls of 
the President for volunteers during the year 1864. 

Northampton furnished seven hundred and thirty-nine men 
for the war, which was a surplus of fifty-nine over and above 
all demands. Thirty-nine were commissioned officers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the 
town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was 
seventy-seven thousand four hundred and fifty-two dollars and 
ninety-one cents ($77,452.91). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to the soldiers' families, and which 
was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $1,611.72; in 1862, $8,044.98; in 1863, $10,- 
738.89; in 1864, $10,597.31; in 1865, $5,611.64. Total 
amount, $36,604.54. 

The ladies of Northampton formed a Soldiers' Aid Society at 
the commencement of the war, with Miss Martha Cochrane as 
president. It met once a week for the purpose of making gar- 
ments, packing boxes, and forwarding the same to the Sanitary 
and Christian Commissions. Their labors were very great, and 
their contributions very liberal, and were continued until the 
return of peace rendered further eflTorts unnecessary. 

Pelham. — Incorporated Jan. 15, 1742. Population in 
1860, 748; in 1865, 739. Valuation in 1860, $174,513; 
in 1865, $197,457. 

The selectmen in 1861 were James M. Cowan, Warren 



PELHAM. 353 

Randall, Asahel Gates ; in 1862, James M. Cowan, Lemuel 
H. Newell, Philander Bartlett ; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, John 
Jones, Dexter Thompson, Alfred Taylor. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years 
was Calvin D. Eaton. 

1861. No action by the town in its corporate capacity in 
regard to the war appears to have been necessary during this 
year. 

1862. July 21st, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers ; also to 
pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer to the 
number of ten, who shall enlist for three years and be X5redited 
to the quota of the town ; and that the cost of " the same be 
assessed on the next annual assessment." August 29th, The 
selectmen were empowered '* to procure all money necessary by 
borrowing or otherwise, and pay the sum of one hundred dollars 
to each person entitled thereto when mustered into service." 
October 20th, "Voted, to pay the five men now in camp at 
Greenfield, over and above our quota, one hundred dollars 
each." 

1863. No action by the town appears to have been neces- 
sary in regard to military matters during this year. 

1864. June 1st, The selectmen were authorized " to borrow 
and pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars for seventeen vol- 
unteers, to fill the quotas of Pelham under the present and future 
calls for men." 

Pelham furnished seventy-eight men for the war, which was 
a surplus of five over and above all demands. None were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was seven thousand five hundred and one dollars 
($7,501.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 

State aid to the families of soldiers during the war, and which 

was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 

In 1861,1163.86; in 1862, $766.53 ; in 1863, $1,192.66; 

in 1864, $1,426.27; in 1865, $676.64. Total amount, 

$4,125.96. 

23 




354 MASSACHUSETTS IX THE REBELLION. 

Plainfield. — Incorporated March 16, 1785. Population 
in 1860, 639; in 1865, 579. Valuation in 1860, $246,739; 
in 1865, $239,097. 

The selectmen during all the years of the war were L#evi N. 
Campbell, Merritt Torrey, Samuel W. Lincoln, Albert Dyer, 
Merritt Jones, and Joseph Sears. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during the same period 
was Freeman Hamlin. 

There does not appear to have been any meeting held by the 
town during the year 1861 to consider matters rehiting to the 
war. Two meetings were held in July and August, 1862, and 
it was voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each 
volunteer who would enlist to fill the quota of the town. The 
immediate effect of which was that three persons enlisted for 
three years, and eighteen for nine months' service. The town 
continued to furnish her quotas all through the war. 

Plainfield furnished sixty-one men for the war, which was a 
surplus of seven over and above all demands. Three were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town for war purposes was four 
thousand five hundred and five dollars ($4,505.00). In addi- 
tion to which twenty-seven hundred dollars were paid by men 
who were drafted for substitutes, and eighteen hundred and 
fifty-five dollars were voluntarily contributed by patriotic citizens 
to encourage recruiting. 

The amount of money raised and expended for the payment 
of State aid to the families of soldiers during the war, and which 
was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows: 
In 1861, 00; in 1862, $299.61; in 1863, $877.60; in 1864, 
$233.90; in 1865, $210.91. Total amount, $1,622.02. 

The ladies of Plainfield did all in their power for the sick and 
wounded, and to aid the Sanitary and Christian Commissions. 

Prescott. — Incorporated Jan. 21, 1822. . Population in 
1860, 611; in 1865, 596. Valuation in 1860, $245,168; 
in 1865, $221,712. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Eli W. Chapin, R. H. Allen, 
Edward A. Thomas; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, William 
H. Winter, Chester H. Gray, Franklin B. Paige. 



PRE8COTT.' 355 

The town-clerk during all these years was Elisha S. Haskins. 
Town-treasurer (luring the years 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, 
was Charles Hodgkln ; in 1865, Chester H. Gray. 

18G1. No legal town-meeting appears to have been held 
during this year to act upon matters connected with the war. 

1862. April 7th, Fifteen hundred dollars were appropriated 
for State aid to the families of volunteers living in the town. 
September 5th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars 
" to each person who will volunteer into the military service of 
the United States until the two quotas of the town are filled." 

1863. Feb. 7th, The same bounty of one hundred dollars to 
each volunteer who should enlist and be credited to the town 
was authorized to be paid. April 6th, Fifteen hundred dollars 
were appropriated for the payment of State aid to the families 
of volunteers. 

1864. April 20th, " Voted, to pay one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars to each of the eleven persons who have volunteered 
as substitutes to fill the quota of the town. At a meeting held 
August 27th, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
was directed to be paid to volunteers enlisting to the credit of 
the town, " on the last call of the President " for more men. 
The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay 
the same. 

1865. April 3d, Voted, to raise five hundred dollars to pay 
bounties and fifteen hundred dollars for State aid to the soldiers' 
families ; also to pay Henry S. Upton, Dexter M. Oaks, Forest 
M. Hanson, and Henry Peirce, "one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars apiece at the time of their being mustered out of ser- 
vice." May 6th, Voted, to refund all money paid by subscrip- 
tion or otherwise, as allowed by law, " to encourage enlistments." 
The treasurer was authorized to borrow money for that purpose. 

Prescott furnished sixty-seven men for the war, which was a 
surplus of seven over and above all demands. None were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was six thousand four hundred and twenty-seven 
dollars and fifty cents ($6,427.50). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 



356 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

State aid to soldiers' families during the war, and which was 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861,149.32; in 1862, $901.82 ; in 1863, $868.60; in 1864, 
$973.96; in 1865, $512.64. Total amount, $3,306.34. 

The ladies of Prescott " sent to the hospitals in Alexandria 
several boxes and barrels of lint, bandages, clothing, socks, 
wines, jellies, and other necessaries, to the value of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars. 

South Hadley. — Incorporated April 12, 1753. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 2,277; in 1865, 2,098. Valuation in 1860, 
$1,040,313; in 1865, $1,103,491. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Hiram Smith, Jr., 
Broughton Alvord, Thomas M. Na^h ; in 1863, 1864, and 
1865, Hiram Smith, Jr., Broughton Alvord, Byron Smith. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, 
was David Turner ; * in 1864 and 1865, Joseph Bard well. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters 
relating to the war was held on the 2d of May, at which Ezra 
Allen and Paoli Lathrop were, with the selectmen, appointed a 
committee to endeavor to raise and drill a military company, 
to " arm and equip such persons belonging to South Hadley as 
may volunteer into the military service, to make all proper and 
necessary provision for the comfortable maintenance of their 
families," to aid and assist the Government as far as practicable 
in a vigorous prosecution of the war, and to borrow upon the 
credit of the town not exceeding five thousand dollars, which 
sum should be subject to their order. 

1862. A town-meeting was held on the 17th of March, at 
which the town authorized the treasurer to borrow one thousand 
dollars for the purpose of paying aid to soldiers' families, and 
other expenses in regard to recruiting. Another vote of a 
similar kind was passed on the 4th of November, and the 
treasurer authorized to borrow an additional sum of fifteen 
hundred dollars. 

1863. A town-meeting was held on the 16th of March, at 

* Mr. Tarner was town-clerk and town-treasurer twentj-three years. 



SOUTHAMPTON. 357 

which the treasurer was authorized to borrow four thousand 
dollars for the payment of bounties to volunteers and State aid 
to the families of the soldiers, and an additional four thousand 
dollars to " cancel the debt already incurred by the town on 
account of the war." 

18G4. At a meeting held on the 14th of March, the town 
voted to raise by taxation four thousand dollars to pay debts 
already contracted on account of the war. At another meet- 
ing held on the 1st of June, the selectmen were authorized to 
borrow whatever sums of money they may require to keep the 
quota of the town filled. On the 4th of November, the town 
voted to raise three thousand dollars to pay State aid to the 
families of soldiers and bounties to volunteers. 

South Hadley furnished two hundred and forty-two men for 
the war, which was a surplus of twenty-three over and above 
all demands. Three were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money raised and expended by the town on ac- 
count of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-four thou- 
sand six hundred and sixty-eight dollars and fifty-two cents 
($24,668.52). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to soldiers' families during the war, 
and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as 
follows: In 1861, $364.74; in 1862, $1,737.13; in 1863, 
$2,861.26; in 1864, $3,333.00; in 1865, $2,000.00. Total 
.amount, $10,296.13. 

Southampton. — Incorporated Jan. 5, 1753. Population 
in 1860, 1,130; in 1865, 1,216. Valuation in 1860, 
$496,462; in 1865, $502,448. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Isaac Parsons, Jonathan N. 
Judd,* Harris Ni mocks ; in 1862, Isaac Parsons, Edson Han- 
num, Artemas Barnes; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Zeno E. 
Colman, Henry S. Sheldon, Lyman C. Tiffany. 

* Mr. Judd died in July, 1861, and Edson Hannum was chosen to fill the 
vacancy in the Board of Selectmen, and £. A. Edwards was appointed town- 
clerk. In October Mr. Edwards raised a company and went to the war, and 
Eiisha Edwards was appointed town-clerk to fill the yacancy. 



358 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was Jonathan N. Judd ; in 1862, 
Elisha Edwards ; intl863, 1864, and 1865, Lyman C. Tiffany. 
The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was A. G. Judd; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, Lewis Hannum. 

1861. The first legal meeting to act upon matters relating 
to the war was held on the 14th of October, at which it was 
voted to pay to each wife, and to each child under sixteen years 
of age, and to each parent, brother, or sister of those who have 
volunteered or may hereafter volunteer in the service of the 
United States, and are dependent upon them for support, the 
sum of one dollar a week '* when found necessary." The treas- 
urer was authorized to borrow five hundred dollars to pay the 
same. 

1862. March 17th, The selectmen were authorized to bor- 
row whatever sum of money was necessary to pay State aid to 
the families of volunteers. September 2d, Voted, to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist 
in the military service for nine months, and be credited to the 
quota of the town. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town 
in its corporate capacity in regard to the war during this year. 

1864. .April 4th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer who shall enlist for three years, and to re-enlisted veterans 
twenty-five dollars additional, when credited to the quota of the 
town ; nineteen hundred and fifty dollars were appropriated to . 
pay said bounties. The payment of this amount of bounty was 
continued until the end of the war. 

1865. May 2 2d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
thirty-two hundreil and sixty-six dollars, to reimburse individ- 
uals who in the year 1864 had advanced money to encourage 
recruiting, and for the payment of bounties. 

Southampton furnished one hundred and twenty-seven men 
for the war, which was a surplus of sixteen over and above all 
demands. Five were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was ten thousand 
eight hundred and eight dollars and twelve cents ($10,808.12). 



WARE. 359 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid during the war, and which was after- 
wards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$92.28; in 1862, $1,131.86; in 1863, $2,013.61; in 1864, 
$1,662.21 ; in 1865, $1,000.00. Total amount, $5,899.96. 

Ware. — Incorporated Nov. 25, 1761. Population in 1860, 
3,597; in 1805, 3,307. Valuation in 1860, $1,309,890; in 
1865, $1,306,545. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Samuel H. Phelps, Lucas Gibbs, 
William A. Root ; in 1862, Otis Lane, William A. Root, John 
H. Pepper; in 1863, Otis Lane, John II. Pepper, Darius 
Eaton ; in 1864, Otis Lane, William E. Bassett, Andrew J. 
Ilarwood ; in 1865, Charles A. Stevens, George Rich, Otis 
Lane. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Francis Dewitt; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, S. B. Witherell. The town-treasurer 
during all these years was Addison Sandford. 

1861. A legal town-meeting was held on the 1st of May, at 
which on motion of W. S. B. Hopkins it was — 

Resolved, That a sum not exceeding five thousand dollars be and 
hereby is appropriated to equip such volunteers as may be raised in 
said Ware to provide for their families in their absence, and for all 
purposes connected with the present war. 

Resolved, That the town-treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to 
borrow such sums of money on behalf of the town, not exceeding the 
above appropriation, as may be necessary, and to keep such sum for 
the purposes above named. 

Resolved, That William Hyde, Rev. Patrick Healey, S. J. Witherell, 
C. A. Stevens, George H. Gilbert, Addison Sandford, S. H. Phelps, J. 
E. Bowdoin, E. Hall, T. F. Sherman, John H. Pepper, J. N. Lewis, 
G. W. Witherell, Sylvester Bowen, and J. W. Brackenridge, be a 
committee to manage and expend the above fund, and that all orders of 
said committee shall be honored by the town-treasurer. 

It was voted to pay each volunteer twenty dollars when mus- 
tered into active service, and at the rate of one dollar a day 
while engaged in drilling, to " those who enlist." 

1862. July 17th, A citizens' meeting was held, at which it 



ii 



360 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

was voted to pay each volunteer for three years' service, when 
mustered in and credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of 
one hurtdred dollars, which vote was ratified at a legal meeting 
held on the 26th of July, and the treasurer was authorized to 
borrow money sufficient to pay the same. It was also — 

Besolvedy That we pledge ourselves to furnish our share of the three 
hundred thousand men called for and apportioned to this town, and to 
furnish material aid for the support of the war, and to make such 
sacrifices as are necessary to sustain the Government Hud the army in 
their endeavors to support the Union of the States, and to defeat the 
rebel leaders and traitors who are engaged in destroying the Govern- 
ment they have sworn to support 

Resolved^ That if tiiere should be a failure to get the number of men 
called for by voluntary enlistment, we would recommend to the Gov- 
ernment to call out by draft five hundred thousand men, to take the field 
and uphold the Constitution. 

August 30th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars 
to each volunteer for nine months* service, who shall enlist and 
be credited to the quota of the town, and the treasurer was 
authorized to borrow money for that purpose. 

1864. April 18th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
not exceeding four thousand six hundred and twenty-five dollars 
to pay citizens who had contributed money for the payment of 
bounties since Oqt. 17, 1863 ; also to pay a bounty of one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who had enlisted 
to fill the quota of the town since Feb. 6, 1864, by re-enlist- 
ment from old regiments. July 30th, Fifty-five hundred dollars 
were appropriated ** to pay the forty-four men the town is called 
upon to furnish." 

1865. March 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
not exceeding twelve thousand dollars for State aid to soldiers' 
families, "or the payment of the town debt." May 10th, 
Voted to appropriate eight thousand five hundred and fifty-eight 
dollars for the payment of money subscribed and paid by 
citizens to fill the quota of Ware for 1864. 

Ware, as reported by the selectmen in 1866, furnished three 
hundred and eleven men for the war, which, we think, is forty 
less than the number actually furnished, as Ware filled its quota 



WESTHAMPTON. 361 

on every call, and had a surplus of twenty over and above all 
demands. Nine were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-six thou- 
sand and twenty-nine dollars (136,029.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended during the war 
for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $712.27; in 1862, 
$4,741.61; in 1863, $5,463.50; in 1864, $5,400.00; in 
1865, $2,600.00. Total amount, $18,917.38. 

Westiiampton. — Incorporated Sept. 29, 1778. Population 
in 1860, 608; in 1865, 637. Valuation in 1860, $298,404; 
in 1865, $291,384. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Medad King, Anson Chapman, 
John Bates ; in 1862, Medad King, John Bates, Enoch H. 
Lyman ; in 1863, Medad King, Enoch H. Lyman, Henry M. 
Parsons ; in 1864, Enoch H. Lyman, Henry M. Parsons, Elbert 
Langdon ; in 1865, Elbert Langdon, Albert G. Jewett, Henry 
W. Montague. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was 
David W. Clark. 

1861. There does not appear to have been any action taken 
by the town in its corporate capacity in relation to the war dur- 
ing this year. 

1862. The first meeting held by the town to consider mat- 
ters in relation to the war was on the 1st of August, at which it 
was voted to pay a bounty of seventy-five dollars to each volun- 
teer credited to the town who shall enlist for nine months in 
the military service. The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money for that purpose. October 4th, The treasurer was 
directed " to pay back to the several collectors all moneys paid 
in by them as bounty money for the town's first quota of three 
hundred thousand men, and that the town treasurer be author- 
ized to borrow six hundred dollars to pay equally to each of the 
six volunteers." 

1863. April 25th, The town voted to raise seventeen hun- 
dred and fifty dollars for the payment of bounties to volunteers. 



362 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1864. July 22d, The selectmen and treasurer were author- 
ized to borrow money to refund to each man who has paid com- 
mutation or has furnished a substitute, or who may pay it under 
the last two calls of the president for men, one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars ; also, to borrow fifteen hundred dollars 
"to aid, when needed, to procure volunteers to fill the quota of 
the town under any future call of the President, by paying a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, tlie same 
amount to be paid to each person who pays commutation or 
provides a substitute." 

1865. May 9th, Voted to pay three hundred dollars to each 
drafted man who in 1864 paid commutation money, or furnished 
a substitute ; also, to assess " this year twelve hundred dol- 
lars," and the remainder in the two succeeding years, to pay 
money borrowed on account of the war. The treasurer was 
authorized to borrow money in advance of the assessment and 
payment of the tax. 

Westhampton furnished sixty-eight men for the war, which 
was a surplus of four over and above all demands. One was a 
commissioned officer. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town for expenses on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was nine thousand four hun- 
dred and fifty-four dollars and fifty cents ($9,454.50). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $81.60; 
in 1862, $561.53; in 1863, $912.93; in 1864, $514.75; in 
1865, $270.92. Total amount, $2,341.99. 

Williamsburg. — Incorporated April 24, 1771. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 2,095; in 1865, 1,972. Valuation in 1860, 
$906,206; in 1865, $1,085,693. 

The selectmen in 1861 were William A. Naeh, William E. 
Thayer, Nathan C. Wrisley; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, 
Nathan C. Wrisley, Elnathan Graves, Thomas Nash. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during these years was 
Thomas M. Carter. 

186 L The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters 



WILLIAMSBURG. 363 

growing out of the war was held on the 2d of May, at which 
H. H. White, D. F. Martin, and William A. Nash were 
chosen " to draft a set of resolutions." They reported as 
follows : — 

Whereas a crisis has arrived in the history of our general govern- 
ment which calls for every one, whether in his national, State, county, 
town, or individual capacity, to speak out his sentiments and use 
prompt and energetic action in sustaining it against the Rehellion that 
is now aimincr to undermine its foundations. Therefore — 

Resolved^ By the inhabitants of Williamsburg, now in town-meeting 
assembled, that we tender to it all the men and means we possess, in 
proportion to our ability, and that we raise the sum of two thousand 
dollars to be placed in the hands of a committee to be expended in 
whole or in part, as necessity require, under the direction of the town, 
for the benefit of such persons as have volunteered or may volunteer 
as soldiers from the town, and for the use of their families. 

Resolved^ That it is not only one of the legitimate, but imperative, 
duties of the geueral government to enforce its laws in every one of 
the States of this Union, whether it has seceded or not; and that it 
has a perfect right to call out troops for that purpose, whenever 
it may deem it wise and judicious so to do; and that there is no 
alternative for patriot citizens but to aid them to the extent of their 
power. 

The resolutions were adopted. Lewis Bodman and D. F. 
Martin were joined with the selectmen " to disburse the money 
raised for volunteers and their families." They were instructed 
to furnish equipments for volunteers, and to pay to each ten dol- 
lars a month while in service. June 17th, The above vote was 
reconsidered, and it was voted that the selectmen have power to 
borrow eleven hundred dollars to fulfil contracts already made 
with volunteers, and to furnish aid to their families, as provided 
by act of the Legislature. 

1862. September Ist, Voted, to raise by taxation six thou- 
sand one hundred dollars to pay bounties to volunteers who 
enlist to the credit of the town. November 17th, The treasurer 
was authorized to borrow whatever money may be required to 
pay State aid to the families of soldiers " until the first day of 
March next." 

During the years 1863, 1864, and 1865, several meetings 



364 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

were held to raise money to pay bounties and State aid to the 
families of volunteers. 

Williamsburg furnished two hundred and fifty men for the 
war, which was a surplus of twenty-nine over and above all 
demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town for war pur- 
poses, exclusive of State aid, was twenty thousand dollars 
(20,000.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which 
was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $355.08 ; in 1862, $1,833.81 ; in 1863, $3,108.48 ; 
in 1864, $2,700.00; in 1865, $2,000.00. Total amount, 
$9,997.37. 

WouTHiNGTON. — Incorporated June 30, 1768. Population 
in 1860, 1,041 ; in 1865, 925. Valuation in 1860, $430,943 ; 
in 1865, $409,655. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Horace Cole, William A. Bates, 
Russell Bartlctt; in 1862, John Adams, Charles F. Cole, 
Aaron Stevens ; in 1863 and 1864, John Adams, Oren Stone, 
A. B. Curtis; in 1865, John Adams, Oren Stone, Marcus A. 
Bates. 

Tlie town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was 
E. C. Porter. 

We have not been able to obtain an abstract from the town- 
records, and therefore cannot give the exact war record of the 
town. 

Worthington, according to the report made by the selectmen 
in 1866, furnished eighty-six men for the war; but as it filled 
its quota upon every call made by the President, and at the end 
of the war had a surplus of nine over and above all demands, it 
must have furnished about one hundred and two men. Four 
were commissioned officers. The amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was four thousand four hundred and sixty-two 
dollars ($4,462.00). 

The amount raised and expended for State aid to the soldiers' 



WORTHINGTON. 365 

families during the war, and which was afterwards repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $135.36; in 
1862, $932.37; in 1863, $2,053.01; in 1864, $589.79; in 
1865, $687.89. Total amount, $4,398.42. 

The ladies of Worthington did every thing within their power 
and means to provide comfortable articles for the sick and 
wounded soldiers, which were sent forward to the front. 



CHAPTER X. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



This county is the most populous in the Commonwealth, and 
next to Suffolk the most wealthy. It has a giand historic re- 
nown : within its limits are "Lexington, Concord, and Bunker 
Hill." It is bounded north by New Hampshire, north-east by 
the county of Essex, south-east by Charles River, Boston Har- 
bor, and Norfolk County, and west by the county of Worcester. 
Its rivers are the MerrimaCj Charles, Mystic, Sudbury, Con- 
cord, and Nashua. Nearly every town is now intersected with 
a railroad. It contains fifty-four cities and towns. Since the 
war the town of Hudson, formed of parts of Marlborough and 
Stow, and the town of Everett, formed of a part of Maiden, have 
been incorporated as separate and distinct towns ; the former, 
March 19, 1866, and the latter, March 9, 1870. Their war 
records form a part of that of the towns from which they were 
set off, and therefore do not appear distinct and separate in this 
volume. In ** old times " the county seat was Concord ; at 
the present time the courts of the county are held in Cambridge 
and Lowell. Middlesex is not only celebrated for its Revolu- 
tionary renown, but for containing Cambridge University, and 
the Navy Yard at Charlestown. Lowell and Waltham are 
well known for their cotton manufactures, as are Marlborough, 
Woburn, Natick, and other towns for the manufacture of shoes. 
The aggregate value of the agricultural and manufacturing 
products of the county in 1870 was $83,102,442. " The surface 
of the county is uneven, and the soil barren. It presents a 
great variety for the admiration of the patriot, scholar, farmer, 
mechanic, and painter." 

The population of Middlesex County in 1860 was 216,352 ; 



ACTON. 367 

in 1865 it was 220,618, being an increase in five years of 4,266. 
The population in 1870 was 274,353, being an increase in five 
years of 53,735. The valuation of the county in 1860 was 
$135,458,009 ; in 1865 it was $155,324,723, being an increase 
in five years of $19,866,714. 

The number of men which Middlesex County furnished for the 
war, according to returns made by the selectmen of the towns 
and mayors of th^ cities in 1866 — with the exception of Con- 
cord and West Cambridge, which do not appear to have made 
a return — was 28,646. West Cambridge and Concord fur- 
nished 524 men, which would make the aggregate, as reported, 
29,170, which we believe to be at least three thousand more 
than was furnished ; and therefore the returns were in many 
cases inaccurate. This fact, however, is certain : that every 
city and town in the county furnished its quota on every call 
made by the President, and at the end of the war each had a 
surplus, which in the aggregate amounted to one thousand six 
hundred and seven. The amount of money expended by the 
various municipalities on account of the war, exclusive of State 
aid, was $2,400,860.40. The amount raised and expended 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was $1,560,825.63, making a grand total 
of three million nine hundred and sixty-one thousand six hun- 
dred and eighty-six dollars and three cents ($3,961,686.03). 

The following are the war records of the cities and towns : — 

Acton. — Incorporated July 3, 1735. Population in 1860, 
1,726; in 1865, 1,660. Valuation in 1860, $821,401; in 
1865, $854,719. 

The selectmen in 1861 and during the war were James E. 
Billings, James K. Putney, J. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Town-clerk during the same years, William D. Tuttle. The 
town-treasurer in 1861 was Winthrop F. Conant; in 1862, 
1863, 1864, and 1865, John E. Cutter. 

1861. A legal town-meeting was held, April 27, '*to see if 
the town would appropriate a sum of money for the assistance 
of the needy families of the Acton 'Davis Guards,'* now in the 

* The Davis Guards was in the Sixth Regiment, which passed through Baltl* 
more on the 19th of April, 1861. 



368 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

service of the United States," at which it was resolved, first, 
"that the citizens of Acton, one and all, whatever may have 
been their former political opinions, will unite and rally around 
the Constitution and flag of our Union, and be ready to imitate 
the noble example of our fathers, who shed their blood in defence 
of our civil and religious liberties ; " second, " that it is the duty 
of every citizen to come forward, and do all in his power, to 
assist in maintaining the rightful authority of the national 
government ; " third, " that the soldiers of the Acton Davis 
Guards, starting, like their namesakes in 1775, at a minute's 
warning, with the Sixth Regiment — being the first to respond 
to the President's call, armed and equipped for the defence of 
the national capital — have honored themselves and the town, 
and shown by their gallant conduct that they are true lineal 
descendants of Davis, Hosmer, and Hey ward, — men who were 
'not afraid to go,' and who fought and fell in defence of our 
liberties ; " fourth, that the town appropriate five thousand 
dollars " for the benefit of the families of soldiers in the town of 
Acton, who are, or may hereafter be, engaged in the service of 
the United States." A committee was appointed to superintend 
the expenditure of the money ; " also, to purchase pistols for 
the use of the Davis Guards." July 16th, A meeting was held 
to make preparations to receive the Davis Guards on their 
return from their three months' service. It was voted to give a 
dinner to the soldiers, their wives, and families. " A band of 
music, and powder and cannon, were furnished." The reception 
was a very pleasant occasion for the soldiers and the citizens. 

1862. July 16th, The town voted to pay a bounty of one 
hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the 
town, and the selectmen and treasurer were authorized to 
recruit the men, and borrow the money to pay the bounties. 
August 20th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dol- 
lars •'to each resident of the town who volunteers in the 
Davis Guards for nine months," and the further sum of twenty- 
five dollars to each of the twenty-three recruits for three years' 
service. December 2d, Voted, that if any more men are 
required from Acton the same bounty shall be paid as before ; 
and if any man is drafted and enters the service he shall receive 
the same bounty. 



ASHBT. 369 

1863. At a town-meeting held November Sd the selectmen 
were authorized to keep on recruiting men, and to pay such 
bounties as they might think proper. This system was continued 
to tlie end of the war. 

Acton furnished one hundred and ninety-five men for the 
military service, which was a surplus of thirty over and above 
all demands. Twenty were commissioned officers. The total 
amount of money raised and expended by the town for war 
purposes, exclusive of State aid, was thirteen thousand and 
seventy-two dollars ($13,072.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 

1861, $731.05; in 1862, $2,416.01; in 1863, $2,556.71; 
in 1864, $1,883.26; in 1865, $1,150.00. Total amount, 
$8,737.03. 

AsHBY. — Incorporated March 5, 1767. Population in 
1860, 1,091 ; in 1865, 1,080. Valuation in 1860, $555,386; 
in 1865, $508,393. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Silas Rice, Joseph Foster, Ben- 
jamin F. Wallis ; in 1862, Joseph Foster, Benjamin F. Wallis, 
J. S. Jaquith ; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, F. W. Wright, J. S. 
Jaquith, Liberty Wellington. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Perez C. Burr; in 
1863, James M. J. Jefts ; in 1864 and 1865, E. Hobart Hay- 
ward. The town-treasuer in 1861 was Stephen Wyman ; in 

1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Francis W. Wright. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
connected with the war, was held on the 1st of May, at which 
the following resolutions, preceded by a patriotic preamble, were 
adopted : — 

Resolved^ That we, the men of Ashby, heartily approve of the 
most energetic and active measures to secure and hold the public ' 
property and to sustain the Government and laws. 

Resolved^ That we pledge ourselves and our property to sustain 

the Constitution, the freedom and rights bequeathed to us by our 

fathers, and we will defend them to the last. 

24 



370 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLTON. 

Resolved^ That there ought to be immediately organized in this 
town a vohinteer force, under military discipline, to act as a *'Home 
Guard," and, if necessary, for the service of the country. 

Resolved^ That if any citizen. of Ashby will volunteer his services 
to the Government, he shall be aided by the town. 

Resolved, That we loan fifteen hundred dollars to the Government, 
to be paid on application of the Governor of Massachusetts. 

It was then voted that each volunteer shall be provided with 
a revolver, a bowie knife, and a Bible, and shall receive also 
ten doliard in money. Levi Burr, Liberty Wellington, and 
B. F. Wallis were chosen to recruit volunteers. November 5th, 
The selectmen were authorized to pay State aid to the fami- 
lies of volunteers, as provided by law. 

1862. August 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hun- 
dred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist in the military 
service, and be mustered in to the credit of the town. The 
selectmen were directed to recruit the quota of the town ; after 
which it was " voted that every man and woman of Ashby be n 
committee to assist them in procuring volunteers." 

1864. August 22d, The selectmen were authorized to pay 
to each volunteer enlisting for three years to fill the quota of 
the town a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars in 
gold, 

1865. July 8th, "Voted, to refund the money paid by sun- 
dry persons to raise soldiers to fill the quota of Ashby under 
the calls of the President in 1864." 

Ashby furnished one hundred and fourteen men for the war, 
which was a surplus of fifteen over and above all demands. 
One was a commissioned oflScer. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by Ashby on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was sixteen thousand nine hundred and 
eighty-five dollars ($16,985.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to soldiers' families during the war, 
and afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : 
In 1861, $45.20; in 1862, $325.46; in 1863, $1,310.00; 
in 1864, $1,461.05; in 1865, $1,000.00. Total amount, 
$4,141.71. 



ASHLAND. 371 

The ladies of Ashby sent to the front barrels, boxes, and 
packages containing hospital stores and under-clothing for the 
soldiers, to the value of several hundred dollars, at intervals 
during the entire period of the war. 

Ashland. — Incorporated March 16, 1846. Population in 
1860, l,5/)4; in 1865, 1,702. Valuation in 1860, $577,860; 
in ISOo, $632,632. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Elias" Grout, W. A. Scott, 
J. N. Pike; in 1862, J. N. Pike, Henry Cutter, Charles 
Alden ; in 1863 and 1864, J. N. Pike, Charles Alden, John 
Clark; in 1865, J. N. Pike, Charles Alden, Alvah MetcjJf. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Arthur A. Cloyes; 
in 1863, J. Edward Tilton ; in 1864, George S. Goddard ; in 
1865, George F. Seaver. The town-treasurer during all these 
years was Benjamin Homer. 

1861. A town-meeting was held June 29th, at which it was 
voted to appropriate five hundred dollars in aid of the families 
of the volunteers. November 6th, Voted eight hundred dollars 
for Jhe same purpose. 

1862. April 7th, Appropriated the sum of five hundred 
dollars in aid of soldiers' families. August 2d, Voted, to pay 
a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer enlisting to 
the credit of the town. August 30th, Voted, to appropriate 
thirty-five hundred dollars for recruiting purposes. September 
27th, Voted, to appropriate two thousand dollars additional. 

1863. March 2d, Voted, to appropriate two thousand dol- 
lars in aid of the families of soldiers, and five hundred dollars 
to bring home the dead bodies of Ashland volunteers who had 
died in the service. December 11th, Voted, to appropriate 
five hundred dollars for recruiting purposes. 

1864. June 29th, The town voted three thousand dollars 
to pay bounties to volunteers enlisting to the credit of the 
town. 

Ashland furnished one hundred and eighty-four men for the 
war, which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. 
None were commissioned ofiScers. The whole amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town for war pur- 



372 MASSAOnUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

poses, exclusive of State aid, was twelve thousand four hundred 
and sixty-eight dollars and fifty-nine cents ($12,468.59). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $564.06; in 1862, $2,144.93; in 1863, $3,301.58; 
in 1864, $3,843.32; in 1865, $2,000.00. Total amount, 
$11,853.89. 

Bedford. — Incorporated Sept. 23, 1729. Population in 
1860, 843; in 1865, 820. Valuation in 1860, $470,657; 
in 1865, $489,123. 

The selectmen during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, 
and 1865, were William A. Steams, William M. Ashby, Oliver 
T. Lane. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Thomas Stiles; 
in 1864 and 1865, William A. Stearns. The town-treasurer 
during all the years of the war was P. W. Chamberlin. 

When information was received of the attack upon the Sixth 
Regiment in Baltimore (April 19th), great indignation was 
expressed. A citizens' meeting was immediately held, in which 
several gentlemen of Bedford made speeches which expressed 
strongly the patriotic feelings of the people, and twenty-two 
hundred and twenty-eight dollars were subscribed to fit out 
volunteers for military service, and to provide for their families. 
Other meetings were held for a like purpose. The first legal 
town-meeting was held on the 8th of July, at which the act 
passed May 23d, in relation to State aid to soldiers' families, 
was adopted. 

1862. March 31st, The free use of the town hall was ten- 
dered to the ladies of Bedford in which to hold the meetings of 
the Ladies' Soldiers- Aid Society. August 11th, A bounty of 
one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to each of eight 
volunteers who should enlist for three years' service before the 
15th, and be credited to the town. September 10th, Voted to 
pay each volunteer for nine months' service a bounty of one 
hundred dollars. On the 1st of October this bounty was 
increased to two hundred dollars, and the selectmen were 
authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 



BELMONT. 373 

1863. April 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money for the payment of aid to the families of volunteers ; 
also to assess a tax of one thousand dollars ^* to pay the amount 
borrowed for war purposes." November 3d, Voted, to pay the 
widows of Henry Hosmer and D. V. Cone ^ their proportion of 
State aid between the death of their husbands and the time the 
law was made allowing State aid to widows." 

1864. Meetings were held March 29th and June 3d, at 
which measures were adopted to procure volunteers to fill the 
quota of the town, and the treasurer authorized to borrow 
money to pay bounties. 

1865. January 4th, Voted, to raise by taxation six hundred 
dollars, "exempting from tax those who in any way are repre- 
sented in the military service of the United States." Several 
acts of the Legislature amendatory of the State-aid law were 
adopted by the town. 

Bedford furnished ninety-five men for the war, which was a 
surplus of four over and above all demands. None were com- 
mis:>ioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was four thousand five hundred dollars ($4,500.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and afterwards 
repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$188.96; in 1862, $842.27 ; in 1863, $1,318.45; in 1864, 
$1,055.37 ; in 1865, $519.73. Total amount, $3,924,78. 

The ladies of Bedford did a large amount of good work for 
the soldiers, knitting socks, making garments, and otherwise 
providing for the comfort of the sick and wounded. They also 
raised money by fairs, which was sent to the Christian Commis- 
sion. The articles of clothing, &c., were sent to the Sanitary 
Commission. 

Belmont. — Incorporated March 18, 1859. Population in 
1860, 1,198 ; in 1865, 1,278. Valuation in 1860, $2,141,709 ; 
in 1865, $3,521,429. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Mansir W, Marsh, 'Jacob Hit- 
tingcr, J. V. Fletcher; in 1862 and 1863, Mansir W, Marsh, 



374 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Thomas Livermore, William Henry Locke ; in 1864, William 
Henry Locke, Amos Hill, Jr., Charles L. Hey wood ; in 1865, 
George W. Ward, Amos Hill, Jr., Daniel A. Tainter. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, was 
Frances E. Yates. The town-treasurer during these years was 
George S. Adams. 

18G1. There does not appear to have been any action taken 
by the town in its corporate capacity during this year in regard 
to the war. 

1862. A meeting was held July 23d, at which it was voted 
to authorize the selectmen to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer to the number of fifteen 
who shall enlist to fill the quota of the town. "J. V. Fletcher 
offered to pay twenty -five dollars additional, and Amos Hill, Jr., 
to give a handsome rifle to the first volunteer." August 2d, "A 
large attendance of ladies and gentlemen. The Belmont Musical 
Association were present and sang during the evening several 
patriotic pieces." Voted, that the town-clerk place the name of 
every volunteer upon the town records. August 23d, A bounty 
of two hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to each volun- 
teer who shall enlist for nine months to fill the quota of the 
town. **The rallying committee reported that through the 
generosity of citizens they had been able to offer an extra 
bounty of twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years' 
service." September 17th, The selectmen were authorized to 
pay volunteers their expenses from the time they enlisted until 
they were mustered into the United-States service. 

1863. During this year several persons were drafted ; those 
who were not rejected on surgical examination paid commuta- 
tion. 

1864. April 13th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
fifteen hundred dollars to pay to each volunteer enlisting to the 
credit of the town a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars ; also voted to raise by taxation three thousand dollars 
to repay money which had been advanced by citizens to encour- 
age recruiting. The selectmen were directed to continue recruit- 
ing volunteers and paying bounties until March 1, 1865. 

Belmont furnished one hundred and thirty-seven men for the 



BLLERIGA. 375 

war, which was a surplus of eight over and above all demands* 
Seven were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, exclu- 
sive of State aid, wjis twenty-two thousand and six dollars 
($22,006.00). This is exclusive of four thousand two hundred 
dollars which were contributed by citizens and not repaid by the 
town. Fourteen citizens, not liable to draft, put in "represen- 
tative recruits." 

The amount of money raised and emended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$22.00; in 1862, $234.00; in 1863, $599.08; in 1864, 
$641.44 ; in 1865, $400.00. Total amount, $1,896.52. 

BiLLERiCA. — Incorporated May 29, 1655. Population in 
1860, 1,776 ; in 1865, 1,808. Valuation in 1860, $1,042,071 ; 
in 1865, $1,086,563. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Joseph Down, Leander Crosby, 
Gardner Parker; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Gardner 
Parker, William S. Gleason, Charles W. French. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of the 
war was Dudley Foster. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters 
relating to the rebellion was held on the 6th of May, at which 
Stephen Gilman, Tliomas Talbot, and George P. Elliot were 
appointed a committee to consider and report what action the 
town ought to take in regard to the threatened civil war. This 
committee reported in favor of immediate and vigorous action ; 
also a series of resolutions, the substance of which is as 
follows : — 

Resolved^ That the town appropriate twenty-five hundred dollars to 
be subject to a committee of nine persons to be chosen by this meeting, 
and that the treasurer be authorized to borrow from time to time, in 
sums not to exceed tliat amount, as the committee may direct. 

Besolved, That the committee provide such articles of clothing and 
equipment, not furnished by the State, for the comfort and convenience 
of such citizens of Billerica as may volunteer in the militiiry service 
of the United States, and that they look after aud provide for the 



376 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

fiuuilies of such volunteers, and appropriate such sums as they maj 
think wise from said fund. 

This report was unanimously adopted, and James R. Faulk- 
ner, Thomas Talbot, Josiah Bowers, George P. Elliot, Stephen 
Gilman, Edward Spaulding, Jona Merriara, and Peter B. Bo- 
honan were chosen the committee of nine. It was then voted to 
add to the committee R. T. Bryant, Joseph Down, Lennder 
Crosby and John Baldwin. June 17th, The committee reported 
that, under the recent acts of the legislature, all appropriations 
made in aid of the families of volunteers must be expended 
under the direction of the selectmen. It was then voted to 
rescind the vote of the 6th of May, by which the expenditure of 
the money was given to a committee, and to appropriate one 
thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of 
volunteers. 

1862. July 21st, A committee appointed for that purpose 
reported the following resolutions, which were adopted : — 

Resolved^ That the people of Billerica will respond to whatever call 
is made upon them, either for men or money, to the full exteut of their 
resources. 

Resolved, That the selectmen be authorized to pay to each volunteer, 
to the uumber of eighteen, a bounty of one huudred and twenty-five 
dollars, who shall be accepted by the United States authorities as a 
soldier, and be credited to the quota of the town ; and that the select- 
men be requested to use their utmost endeavors to procure the men. 

The "quota was filled almost immediately." August 25th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer 
who shall enlist for nine months* military service, and be 
credited to the quota of the town. 

1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the 
town, in its corporate capacity, during this year to keep its 
quota filled. 

1864. May 30th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for 
three years' service, and be credited to the town ; and Thomas 
Talbot, Gardner Parker, James Faulkner, Elijah Corliss, and 
Dudley Foster were appointed to assist the selectmen in recruit- 



BOXBOROUOH. 377 

ing service, with authority to ^ draw upon the treasury of the 
town for such sums of money as they might require for the pur- 
pose." The treasurer was directed to borrow the money. 

Billerica furnished one hundred and seventy-three men for 
the war, which was a surplus of four over and above all de- 
mands. Seven were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war was six thousand two hundred and thirty dollars and 
ninety-one cents. This, however, does not include eight thou- 
sand nine hundred and ninety-four dollars and thirty-six cents 
which was contributed by subscriptions made by citizens, o£ 
which seven thousand and forty-seven dollars and fourteen cents 
were afterwards repaid to them by the town ; which made the 
aggregate expenses of the town on account of the war, exclu- 
sive of State aid, $13,278.05. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for the payment of State aid to the families of 
volunteers, and which was repaid by the Commonwealth, was 
as follows: In 1861, $389.05; in 1862, $2,359.28; in 1863, 
$3,581.66; in 1864, $3,7f3.29; in 1865, $2,200.00. Total 
amount, $12,243.28. 

BoxBOROUGH. — Incorporated Feb. 25, 1783. Population 
in 1860, 403; in 1865, 454. Valuation in 1860, $221,755; 
in 1865, $238,592. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Varnum Taylor, R. T. 
Cobleigh, George Hager ; in 1863, Varnum Taylor, Grenville 
Whitcorab, Jacob Littlefield ; in 1864, Varnum Taylor, Benja- 
min S. Mead, Ephraim B. Cobleigh ; in 1865, Ephraim B. 
Cobleigh, Benjamin S. Mead, Walter Mead. 

The town-clerk during all these years was Daniel W. Cob- 
leigh. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Benja- 
min S. Hager; in 1864 and 1865, Daniel W. Cobleigh. 

1861. No meetings appear to have been held during this 
year in regard to the war. 

1862. August 2d, A citizens' meeting was held ; Oliver 
Wetherbee was elected chairman, and Daniel W. Cobleigh 
secretary. A vote was passed to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each man ^ who would come forward and volunteer,** 



378 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

and be mustered in to the credit of the town. Four men 
responded and were subsequently mustered into the military 
service. Several other citizens' meetings were held. A legal 
town-meeting was held August 23d, at which it was voted to 
pay a bounty of one hundred dolhirs to each volunteer for nine 
months' service, and an extra five dolhirs to those who w^ould 
enlist within one week, and ten dollars extra to those who 
would enlist on the spot. Five persons came forward and 
enlisted, who were soon after mustered into the service. Octo- 
ber 13th, A town-meeting was held at which the selectmen 
were authorized to pay a bounty to each volunteer who would 
enlist to the credit of the town of one hundred and fifty 
dollars, and the same amount to each person who may be 
drafted. This was continued until the end of the war. 

Boxborough furnished for the war fifty-one men, which was 
a surplus of seven over and above all demands. None of them 
were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, 
exclusive of State aid, was seven thousand and forty-six dollars 
and eighty-seven cents ($7,046.87). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
repaid by the CommonweJilth, was as follows : In 1 8(51, 00 ; 
in 1862, $99.82; in 1863, $276.20; in 1864, $445.00; in 
1865, $526.51. Total amount, $1,347.53. 

About two hundred dollars were raised by the ladies of the 
town for the Christian Commission. 

Brighton. — Incorporated Feb. 24, 1807. Population in 
1860, 3,375; in 1865, 3,859. Valuation in 1860, $3,488,- 
577; in 1865, $3,812,694. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were J. F. Taylor, Gran- 
ville Fuller, Wm. R. Champney ; in 1863, Granville Fuller, 
William R. Champney, W. D.Bickford; in 1864, William 
R. Champney, W. D. Bickford, Patrick Colby; 1865, W. D. 
Bickford, William R. Champney, C. H. B. Brcck. 

The town-clerk for all these years was W. W. Warren. The 
town-treasurer from 1836 to 1869, thirty-three years, was 
Henry H. Leonard. 



BRIGHTON. 379 

1861. May 3(1, A town-meeting was held to consider what 
the town would do to raise and equip a volunteer company to 
be ready for action. (This was the day before the President 
called for men for three years' service.) It was voted to ap- 
propriate two thousand dollars for the purpose ; to uniform and 
equip the men with what they might require, in addition to 
what the State would furnish ; and a committee was chosen to 
carry the vote into effect. It was also voted to pay a bounty 
of twenty dollars to each private of said company, " in case he 
should be called into active service ; " and a further sum of 
thirteen hundred dollars was placed at the disposal of the com- 
mittee. It was also voted that ten dollars a month be paid 
** to each citizen of the town who has joined or may join a mili- 
tary company" while in service, and ''ten dollars a month 
additional to the support of his family." It was also voted to 
place five thousand dollars in the hands of the selectmen "to 
carry the last vote into effect." 

1862. July 15th, It was voted to appropriate " one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars for each volunteer to make up the town's 
quota of forty men ; that five thousand dollars be raised by a 
tax on property, and that the poll-tax payers "have the privilege 
of paying to the committee such sums as they see fit." This was 
in fact a voluntary tax. The treasurer was required to keep a 
correct account of all sums thus raised, and the tax-bill was to 
be made out separate and distinct from the usual legal bix-bill, 
and he was authorized to borrow five thousand dollars in antici- 
pation, to meet present wants. The moderator of the meeting 
was Joseph Breck ; and he appointed W. D. Bickford, H. W, 
Jordan, J. F. Taylor, C. C. Southard, and J. W. George, on 
the committee. August 21st, The town voted to pay each 
volunteer for nine months one hundred dollars ; and the same 
committee was appointed to manage recruiting, except that 
A. W. Brabiner was put on it in the place of J. W. George. 
The treasurer was authorized. to borrow money. The assessors 
were also authorized to assess a tax to meet the expenditure, 
and the collector was directed to collect it " as soon as practi- 
cable." November 5th, The committee reported that they had 
received five thousand dollars, and had paid it to forty volunteers 
for the town, each receiving one hundred and twwtgr-fiTe dollars. 




380 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

In addition to which they had received from voluntary sub- 
scriptions, to wit : J. F. Taylor one hundred dollars, H. W. 
Baxter one hundred dollars ; and from Thomas Sinclair, N. & 
S. Jackson, John W. HoUis, Life Baldwin, and Henry Claflin 
fifty dolhirs each, for recruiting purposes. The committee was 
voted the thanks of the town for their services. November 
26th, It was voted to appropriate seven thousand two hundred 
dollars "to be used by the selectmen" to furnish the quota of 
Brighton under the new call of the President. 

1863. November 20th, It was voted to open a recruiting 
office, and a large committee was appointed to obtain the men. 
It was also voted to employ a band of music, and a committee 
was appointed to collect funds ; also that the treasurer be 
authorized to borrow money to meet the expenditure. 

Several other meetings were held, but all for the same pur- 
pose, to obtain recruits and pay bounties, which were continued 
from time to time until the close of the war. 

1865. At a town-meeting held April 24th, a report was 
made by Charles Heard on the subject of erecting a monument 
in honor of the soldiers of Brighton who had fallen in the war, 
the cost of which was to be raised by voluntary subscription 
from " each adult male and female, and from each of the school 
children in town ; " which report was accepted and a committee 
appointed to carry into effect the recommendations therein 
made. This monument has since been erected, and at a town- 
meeting held December 8th, twelve hundred dollars "were 
appropriated for enclosing the soldiers' monument." 

Brighton furnished three hundred and sixty-five men for the 
war, which was a surplus of five over and above all demands. 
Fifteen were commissioned officers. The whole amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was seventy-eight thousand and 
fifty dollars ($78,050.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $191.36; 
in 1862, $1,093.32 ; in 1863, $1,996.96 ; in 1864, $4,606.40; 
in 1865, $3,935.06. Total amount $11,823.10. 



BURLINGTON. 381 

Burlington. — Incorporated Feb. 28, 1799. Population in 
1860, 606; in 1865, 594. Valuation in 1860, $328,461; in 
1865, $408,136. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Nathan Blanchard, William 
Winn, John Wood; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Nathan Blan- 
chard, William Winn, Abner Shed; in 1865, Nathan Blan- 
chard, William Winn, John Wood. 

The town -clerk and town-treasurer during all these years 
was Samuel Sewell, Jr. 

1861. The first meeting, to consider matters relating to 
the war, was held April 30th, at which Oakes Tirrill, William 
Winn, Nathan Blanchard, Charles G. Foster, and Marshall 
Wood were chosen to consider the subject of an appropriation 
of money to volunteers and report at an adjourned meeting. 
May 7th, The committee reported that ten dollars a month be 
paid by the town to each unmarried volunteer, and twenty dol- 
lars a month to each married volunteer, who shall enlist and 
be mustered in to the credit of the town, the pay to continue 
for three months from date of muster ; also to furnish each 
volunteer with a uniform, the money to be expended under the 
direction of the selectmen. The report was adopted. 

1862. July 2l8t, Voted, to authorize the selectmen to pay 
a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer 
who shall enlist for three years to fill the quota of the town. 
A large committee was appointed to canvass the town for re- 
cruits. August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to the 
credit of the town for nine months' service. Several meetings 
were held during the year to hear reports of the recruiting com- 
mittee and to encourage enlistments. 

1863. December 5th, The recruiting committee reported 
that it would be necessary to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, in order to fill the quota 
of the town under the pending call of the President for more 
men, and it was decided that the money to pay these bounties 
be raised by private subscription ; and Nathan Simonds, Oakes 
Tirrill, and Otis Cutter were added to the recruiting committee. 

1864. April 9thf It was unanimously voted to authorize 



382 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

the treasurer, under the direction of the selectmen, to refund 
the money contributed for recruiting purposes by private citi- 
zens of the town during the year 1863, and to raise the same 
by taxation ; also to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars to each of five men who will volunteer to fill the 
quota of the town, ''under the last call of the President for 
two hundred thousand men ; " and William Winn and Oakes 
Tirrill were chosen to recruit them. June 6th, Voted, to pay 
the same bounty to volunteers until the 1st of March, 1865, 
and the treasurer was authorized to borrow such sums of money 
as may be required to pay bounties. 

1865. June 9th, Voted, to reimburse the monev raised bv 

9 9 ^ tt 

subscription during the past year, " though not till after being 
assessed and paid into the treasury." 

Burlington furnished eighty-two men for the war, which 
was a surplus of four over and above all demands. None were 
commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive 
of State aid, was ten thousand six hundred and fifty-one dollars 
($10,651.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers, and afterwards repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $157.46; 
in 1862, $300.00; in 1863, $255.85; in 1864, $637.00; in 
1865, $450.00. Total amount, $1,800.31. 

Cambridge. — Incorporated as a town Sept. 8, 1633, and 
as a city March 17, 1846. Population in 1860, 26,060; in 
1865, 29,114. Valuation in 1860, $20,515,905; in 1865, 
$25,987,971. 

The mayors, aldermen, city-clerk, and city-treasurer during 
the years of the war, were as follows: In 1861, James D. 
Green, mayor, who resigned on the 24th of July, and was suc- 
ceeded by Charles Theodore Russell. The aldermen were Levi 
L. Cushing, Jr., Curtis Davis, Amory Houghton, Henry 
Lamson, Charles H. Saunders, Samuel Slocumb, Albert Ste- 
vens, James II. Thayer, Israel Tibbetts, Albert Vinal. In 
1862, Charles Theodore liussell, mayor ; Levi L. Cushing, Jr., 



CAMBRIDGE. 383 

.Curtis Davis, Amory Houghton, Henry Lamson, Charles H. 
Saunders, James H. Thayer, Israel Tibbetts, Hosca Jewell, 
J. Warren Merrill, Henry Whitney, Samuel W. Dudley, 
aldermen. In 1863, George C. Richardson, mayor; Henry 
Lamson, Albert Stevens, James H. Thayer, Israel Tibbetts, 
Hosea Jewell, Samuel W. Dudley, George H. Folger, Samuel 
James, Ezra Parmenter, John P. Putnam, aldermen. In 
1864, Z. L. Raymond, mayor ; Samuel W. Dudley, George 
H. Folger, Ezra Parmenter, George P. Carter, Charles F. 
Choate, John Livermore, Arthur Merrill, James R. Morse, 
Fordyce M. Stimson (to March 23d), Francis L. Chapman 
(from April), Joseph H. Tyler, aldermen. In 1865, J. War- 
ren Merrill, mayor; Samuel W. Dudley, George P. Carter, 
Charles F. Choate, John Livermore, Joseph H. Tyler, Francis 
L. Chapman, George B. Lothrop, Alpheus Meade, James M. 
Price, John L. Sands, aldermen. 

The city-clerk during all the years of the war was Justin A. 
Jacobs. The city-treasurer during the same period was Joseph 
Whitney. 

1861. The first meeting of the city government, to act 
upon matters relating to the war, was held on the 17th of 
April, at which five thousand dollars were appropriated "for 
support of the families of volunteers, to be expended under 
the direction of a joint-committee consisting of the mayor, 
two aldermen, and three members of the common council. A 
joint-committee was also appointed to confer with commanders 
of military companies of Cambridge in regard to their wants, 
and to make them known to the citizens of Cambridge. A 
vote of thanks was passed to the ladies of Cambridge, through 
Hon. Joel Parker, for their offer of flannel under-garments 
for the volunteers " who this day marched from Cambridge." 
April 22d, A communication was received from Hon. Joel 
Parker stating that the above offer was " his own personal offer, 
and renewing the same." Drs. W^ellington, Wyman, and 
Webber offered to supply medical or surgical assistance to the 
families of volunteers, free of charge, for which the thanks of 
the city were given. The following preamble and resolutions 
were adopted : — 



384 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Whereas civil war exists in our country, by reason of the lawless 
and rebellious conduct of a portion of the citizens, in armed opposition 
to tbe Government ; and — 

Whereas the President has called upon all loyal citizens to assist 
him in the execution of the laws ; and — 

Whereas a large number of the citizens of our own city have volun- 
teered to render aid in obedience to said call, and have enrolled them- 
selves in the militia, in conformity with the laws relating thereto, and 
have appealed to the public for aid in supplying them with clothing 
and other necessaries for which they do not feel able to bear the ex- 
pense ; be it therefore — 

Resolved^ That this city council recognize in the alacrity with which 
citizens liave volunteered to go forward in sustaining the honor o the 
country and tlie maintenance of law, an exliibition of true patriotism, 
and a spirit worthy of tlie admiration of all good men ; and that it is 
our duty to show them by all means we possess our hearty encourage- 
ment and support. 

Resolved^ That we consider it of the highest importance that no 
time be lost in the departure of the militia to their post of duty, and 
that their necessities and comfort should be immediately and amply 
provided for ; and in furtherance thereof be it — 

Ordered^ That the joint special committee on the disbursement of 
the sum appropriated for the rendering of assistance to the families of 
Cambridge volunteers be authorized to provide uniforms and such 
articles as may be necessary for the comfort of the troops for such 
companies as may be raised in Cambridge. 

Ordered^ That the mayor be authorized to draw his order upon the 
city treasurer for such sums as may become due under the above 
order, the same to be charged to the appropriation for incidental ex- 
penses. 

An appropriation of seventeen hundred dollars for watering 
streets was transferred to the appropriation for aid to soldiers' 
families. April 24th, a petition was received signed by Hon. 
Jared Sparks and others asking that the city council would take 
action in relation to a mass meeting to be holden on the 27th 
instant, under the "Washington Elm," to consider and act upon 
the present state of the country. Referred to the mayor with 
full power.* May Ist, Dr. C. H. Allen offered his professional 

♦ A brief account of the meeting will be found in volume I., pp. 116 
and 117. 



CAMBRIDGE. 385 

services, free of charge, to the families of volunteers. Several 
orders were passed to provide rations, barracks, and room for 
enlistments, and drill for the company being recruited by Captain 
S. W. Richardson ; also, to provide for the families of the men 
who were not yet mustered into the service ; also, to decorate 
with a flag the chair of Lieutenant Porter, a member of the 
common council, who had volunteered for active service. May 
8th, Drs. Anson Hooker, Anson P. Hooker, Moses Clark, J. 

B. Taylor, and Ephraim Manster tendered their professional 
services to the families of volunteers. May 15th, The ladies of 
the First Universalist Church made an offer of $304.25, con- 
tributed by said society for aid to volunteers. June 8th, Two 
hundred dollars were voted to Captain John T. Burgess, for 
expenses incurred by him in raising a company of volunteers, 
which was afterwards increased to three hundred dollars. This 
company afterwards went to New York and joined " The Excel- 
sior Brigade." July IGth, Three hundred dollars were appropri- 
ated to give a reception to Captain J. P. Richardson's Company 
on its return from three months' service. September 11th, Two 
hundred dollars were appropriated to aid Captain J. B. Whorf 
in raising a company. September 25th, One hundred and 
seventy-five dollars were voted to aid enlistments in Company 

C, Twenty-ninth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. October 
9th, The use of a room in the city hall was granted to Mrs. 
Agassiz and Miss Felton, wherein to employ the families of 
volunteers "in making clothing under a contract." October 
9th, A committee of the city government was appointed to 
solicit donations "of blankets and stockings for soldiers." No- 
vember 27th, The mayor and one member of the common 
council were appointed a committee to visit, at the expense of 
the city, the regiments on the Potomac, in which there were 
Cambridge soldiers, see that they were well cared for, and take 
charge of any sums of money which they might wish to send 
home to their friends. 

1862. March 12th, Fifty thousand dollars were appropriated 

for aid to volunteers and their families. May 7th, Voted, to 

pay the same aid to the families of sailors in the navy as is paid 

25 



386 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

to the families of soldiers in the army.* May 14th, The follow- 
ing preamble and order were adopted : — 

Whereas Cambridge learns with mournful pride that in the battles 
of the past few days some of her brave citizens in the service of their 
country have lost their lives, and it is eminently becoming and right 
that prompt measures be taken to have their remains brought home 
with all care and respect. Therefore — 

Ordered, That a committee of two, consisting of his honor the mayor 
and one member of the common council, is hereby appointed to proceed 
to the different battle grounds where our men have been engaged, if 
they deem it expedient, and provide for the securing and proper trans- 
mission of the remains to our city ; and the committee shall look after 
the sick and wounded of our city, ministering liberally in all cases 
where necessary ; and the mayor is authorized to draw his warrant for 
all expenses incurred in the discharge of these duties ; and it is further — 

Ordered, That the sum of five hundred dollars is appropriated and 
put into the hands of his honor, in advance, for disbursement, and the 
mayor is authorized to draw his warrant for this amount before pro- 
ceeding on the duty ; the same to be charged to the appropriations for 
Cambridge soldiers and their families. 

July 9th, A communication was received from the mayor in 
regard to the new call of the President for more troops, which 
was referred to a joint committee, which reported as follows : — 

Whereas a call has been made upon the Governor of Massachusetts 
by the President of the United States for fifteen thousand volunteers, 
the proportion of the city of Cambridge being four hundred and four 
men, which number it is desirable to raise as soon as possible ; there- 
fore, to encourage enlistments, it is — 

Ordered, That seventy-five dollars be paid by the city to each 
accepted recruit, to the number of four hundred and four, who shall 
enlist from this city as one of the quota, and shall be mustered into the 
service of the United States as a volunteer for three years or during 
the war ; said sum to be paid him'on satisfactory evidence being pre- 
sented that he has been so mustered in ; the amount thus expended to 
be charged to the appropriation for volunteers and their families. The 
men thus recruited shall, if authorized by the commander-in-chief, be 
formed into four companies, to constitute a part of one regiment. 

* At this time men in the navj were not credited to the quotas of cities or 
towns. 



CAMBRIDGE. 387 

A joint committee on recruiting was appointed ; also, a 
committee to make arrangement for a public meeting to be held 
on the 12th, "to respond to the call of the Governor for imme- 
diate action." July 16th, The bounty to each volunteer was 
increased to one hundred dollars. July 30th, The appropria- 
tion for volunteers and their families was increased fifty thousand 
dollars. August 13th, The police were ordered to assist the 
assessors in making an enrollment of citizens between the ages 
of eighteen and forty-five years. August 20th, A committee 
to secure the quota of Cambridge, under the second call of the 
President for nine-months men, were directed to open a rendez- 
vous, and to pay each volunteer a bounty of fifty dollars. Two 
thousand dollars were put into the hands of the committee to 
fill up the quota of three-years men, "and to encourage the 
nine-months men." A warrant was issued for a general meeting 
on the 28th, to take action in regard to securing the quota of 
volunteers for nine months' service. August 28th, A roll of 
the volunteers of Cambridge was ordered to be engrossed and 
placed on file. The citizens' meeting recommended the payment 
of a bounty of two hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine 
months' service, which, on the 29th, was concurred in by the 
city council. September 5th, Ninety-five thousand dollars were 
appropriated for payment of bounties. September 1 7th, it was — 

Ordered, That recruiting be continued after the quota of four hun- 
dred and seventy nine-months men is secured, to the extent of another 
conapany, *^ so as to be sure that the quota shall be filled." 

October 15th, Twenty thousand dollars were appropriated 
for State aid to the families of volunteers. November. 21st, 
The proposal of Hon. Amos A. Lawrence to furnish for the 
quota of Cambridge seventy-five men for the Second Regiment 
of Massachusetts Cavalry at a cost of fifteen thousand dollars 
was accepted, and twenty-five thousand dollars were appro- 
priated " for volunteers and their families." December 31st, A 
lot was ordered to be set apart in the Cambridge Cemetery as a 
burial place for Cambridge soldiers "who shall fall in their 
country's service." 

1863. A committee of arrangements was appointed to give 




388 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

an appropriate reception to Company F, Sixth Regiment, of 
Cambridge on its return from nine months' service. July 1st, 
The same for the reception of Companies I, Forty-Third Regi- 
ment ; also soldiers in the Forty-Fourth, Forty-Fifth, and Fifth 
Regiments, " and the two Cambridge companies in the Forty- 
Seventh Regiment." All of these organizations were in the 
nine months service. July 22d, Voted, to pay State aid to 
the families of men who may be drafted. The thanks of the 
city were voteil to the " Cambridge Reserve Guard," Captain 
Bullard, "Washington Home Guard," Captain Bradford, Com- 
pany F, Sixth Regiment, Captain Sawyer, " Harvard Cadets," 
Captain Longley, "for their services during the draft riots." 
September IGth, An order was passed to pay from the city 
treasury seventy-six thousand ninety-eight dollars and ninety- 
four cents to the Commonwealth, the same being the proportion 
of Cambridge of the State tax for reimbursement of bounties. 
October 30th, A resolve was passed to petition the Governor to 
call an extra session of the Legislature " to take measures to 
secure the quota of Massachusetts." Tlie recruiting committee 
was authorized to expend " whatever money was necessary to fill 
the quota of the city." 

1864. March 23d, "Voted all necessary money to fill the 
quota of Cambridge under the late call of the President for two 
hundred thousand men." 

May 18th, The thanks of the city were voted to George C. 
Richardson, of the Common Council, "to whose efforts in a 
great degree is due the success of Cambridge in filling its quota, 
and avoiding the necessity of a draft." June 2 2d, Voted, to 
give a public reception to the two Cambridge companies in the 
Sixteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, and the Seventy- 
Fourth Regiment New-York Volunteers, on their return home 
after a service of three years. July 16th, Resolutions were 
adopted in relation to P. Stearns Davis, colonel of the Thirty- 
Ninth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, who resigned his seat 
in the common council to take command of the regiment.* 
August 17th, The city voted to pay to each Cambridge soldier 

* Colonel Davis was one of the best and bravest officers in the Common* 
wealth. He was killed in action, July 11, 1864, near Petersburg, Va. 



CAMBRIDGE. 389 

in the First Regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, who did not 
receive Government bounty because discharged before serving 
two years, a gratuity of one hundred dollars, which on the 31st 
of August was extended so as to include men who were in other 
regiments and similarly discharged. 

1865. January 2d, The recruiting committee was author- 
ized " to spend all necessary sums to fill the quota of Cambridge 
under the recent call of the President for three hundred thou- 
sand additional volunteers.'' May 24th, Voted, to give a public 
reception to Companies A, B, and F, Thirty-Eighth Regiment 
Massachusetts Volunteers, on their return to Cambridge at the 
end of the war. 

Cambridge furnished three thousand six hundred men for the 
war, which was a surplus of one hundred and fifty-eight over 
and above all demands. One hundred and eighty -five were 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by Cambridge on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was four hundred and fifty thousand 
nine hundred and seventy eight dollars and forty cents 
($450,978.40). 

The amount of money raised and expended by Cambridge 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families 
of soldiers and sailors engaged in the war, and which was after- 
wards refunded to it by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 
1861, $13,529.44; in 1862, $55,000.00; in 1863, $73,403.77 ; 
in 1864, $64,000.00; in 1865, $37,000.00. Total amount, 
$242,933.21. 

The ladies of Cambrido:e were earlv enlisted to do charitable 
and Christian work for the soldiers. Every religious society 
was interested in the cause, and in each ward of the city organ- 
izations were formed. In East Cambridge tliere were two 
organizations; one, ''The Soldiers' Aid Society," was connected 
with the Unitarian society, and had thirty-one members, of 
which Mrs. Samuel Slocomb was president, Mrs. Walter S. 
Bhinchard, secretary, and Miss Mary Parmenter, treasurer. 
This society raised four hundred and ninety-six dollars and 
eighty-four cents in money, made one thousand and thirty-six 
garments, which were forwarded to the army in eleven boxes. 



390 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The Other East Cambridge organization was called the " Soldiers' 
Relief Association,*' and numbered three hundred and sixtv 
members who were attached to different religious societies. 
This society was organized in 1862,- and was joined by the 
members of tlie other society which was then disbanded. The 
officers were Mrs. J. R. Knight, president, Miss H. E. Reed, 
recording-secretary, Miss Mary Parmenter, corresponding- 
secretary, Miss H. Davis, treasurer. They raised in money 
two thousand nine hundred and eighty-nine dollars and sixty- 
four cents, and forwarded to the front twenty -seven boxes of 
clothing and other useful articles. " The Cambridgeport Soldiers' 
Aid Association " was organized by a union of the ladies of the 
different religious societies in that part of the city in 1864. 
The officers were Mrs. J. M. S. Williams, president, Mrs. H. 
O. Houghton, corresponding-secretary, Mrs. W. W. Welling- 
ton, recording-secretary, Mrs. J. M, Cutter, treasurer. The 
Association numbered three hundred members. The amount 
of money which it raised was two thousand seven hundred and 
thirty-five dollars and thirty-five cents. Number of garments 
made, three thousand three hundred, which were forwarded in 
' seventeen boxes. Previous to the organization of this union 
society, the ladies of the various religious societies in Cam- 
bridgeport had raised in money five thousand one hundred and 
eighty-five dollars and seventy-one cents, and had sent forward 
sixty-five boxes of articles. 

The Old Cambridge " Sanitary Society " was starte<l in Octo- 
ber, 1861, two months before the formation of the Boston 
Branch of the United-States Sanitary Commission, by two 
young ladies, Miss Marianne G. Washburn and Miss Catherine 
A. Eliot. For three years and two months they took charge of 
all the society work, assisted by various ladies in the cutting 
and making of garments, and the packing of the articles made and 
received as donations ; Miss Washburn acting as treasurer, and 
Miss Eliot as secretary. In January, 18()5, the Society was re- 
organized, its labors having become too onerous to be longer 
carried on without more subdivision of labor and responsibility ; 
and Mrs. Jane L. Gray appointed president, Mrs. Mary H. 
Cooke, treasurer, and Miss Catherine A. Eliot, secretary. 



CARLISLE. 391 

They continued the work of the Society till July, 1865, when 
the return of peace ended their labors. The officers were, — 
executive committee, Mrs. H. W. Paine, Miss Catherine B. 
Foster ; purchasing committee, Mrs. A. K. P. Welch, Miss 
Abby Francis ; and a finance committee of nineteen ladies. 
The amount of money raised was twelve thousand four hundred 
and sixty-eight dollars and twenty-five cents ($12,468.25), and 
the estimate of work done was seventeen thousand two hundred 
and forty-eight (17,248) articles made. Articles forwarded 
(made by the Society, and received as donations), twenty-one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-two (21,892). The first 
three boxes, packed between October, 1861, and January, 

1862, were sent to St. Louis. After the formation of the 
Boston Branch of the United-States Sanitary Commission in 
January, 1862, all the articles (with the exception of one box 
to St. Louis) were forwarded to the Boston Branch in boxes, 
barrels, and bundles, as was most convenient for the express. 

Carlisle. — Incorporated April 28, 1780. Population in 
1860, 621; in 1865, 629. Valuation in 1860, $328,461; 
in 1865, $354,122. 

The selectmen in 1861 were George F. Duren, Joel Boyn- 
ton, Selar Simons ; in 1862, George F. Duren, Joel Boynton, 
Isaac Blaisdell ; in 1863, John Q. A. Greene, L. Wilkins, 
James M. Currier; in 1864, George F. Duren, John Jacobs, 
Seba D. Bartlett; in 1865, George Duren, Seba D. Bartlett, 
Joel Boynton. 

The town-clerk during all these years was George F. Duren. 
The town- treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was Thomas Greene ; in 

1863, 1864, and 1865, William Greene. 

1861. The first action taken by the town, in its corporate 
capacity, in matters relating to the war, was on the 11th of 
May, when it voted to pay each volunteer nine dollars a month 
in addition to his Government pay, the number not to exceed 
ten, and the payment to continue for one year. Selar Simons, 
Benjamin F. Heald, and Artemas Parker " were authorized to 
draw on the town- treasurer for such sums as may be requisite 
to carry the above vote into effect." 



392 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1862. July 2l8t, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer, to the number of nine, who shall enlist 
for three years and be credited to the quota of the town. The 
treasurer was authorized to borrow nine hundred dollars to pay 
the same. Rev. Josiah Ballard, Selar Simons, Artemas Parker, 
S. H. Bobbins, and Humphrey Prescott "were appointed to 
canvass for volunteers." August 27th, The same bounty was 
authorized to be paid for nine-months recruits, and Asa Nickles, 
Charles T. Worthley, and William A. Ingham were chosen 
to recruit the quota of the town. September 8th, Voted, to 
pay one hundred dollars to each of the volunteers credited 
to the town who has received no bounty. The bounty to nine- 
months men was increased to one hundred and fifty dollars. 

1863. March 2d, Appropriated one thousand dollars for aid 
to the families of volunteers. April 6th, The selectmen were 
authorized to pay State aid to the families of deceased volun- 
teers, and to those who have been disabled by disease. 

1864. April 4th, One thousand dollars were appropriated 
for aid to the families of volunteers, and it was voted to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer and drafted man when credited to the quota of the town. 
August 15th, Voted, to pay the bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars in gold ; and the selectmen were authorized 
to enlist as many men '*as they may think necessary to fill the 
quota of tlie town on any call that may be made prior to March, 
1865," and the treasurer was authorized to borrow the money 
to pay the same. 

Carlisle furnished seventy-four men for the war, which was a 
surplus of two over and above all demands. None were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was ten thousand seven hundred and twenty-four 
dollars and ninety cents ($10,724.90). "During the struggle 
nearly all the citizens of the town exerted themselves as best 
they could to meet the demands of the Government and aid in 
putting down the rebellion.'" 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 



CHABLESTOWN. 393 

Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $37.60; in 1862, 
$903.41; in 1863, $1,423.80; in 1864, $1,251.16; in 1865, 
$900.00. Total amount, $4,515.97. 

Charlestoavn. — Incorporated as a town, June 24, 1629; 
as a city, March 10, 1847. Population in 1860, 25,062 ; in 
1865, 26,398. Valuation in 1860, $15,420,760; in 1865, 
$18,292,544. 

Officers : In 1861, Horace G. Hutchins, mayor; Edwin F. 
Adams, William W. Peirce, Naham Chapin, Nathaniel Brown, 
Joseph Caldwell, Rufus Mason, aldermen. In 1862, Phinehas 
J. Stone, mayor; Andrew Sawtell, Francis Childs, Francis 
Thompson, Philander S. Briggs, Otis Little, James F. Dwinell, 
Joseph Caldwell, Joseph Lovett, Charles A. Barker, aldermen. 
In 1863, Phinehas J. Stone, mayor; Andrew Sawtell, Francis 
Childs, Francis Thompson, Philander S. Briggs, James F. Dwi- 
nell, Otis Little, Joseph Lovett, Charles A. Barker, Joseph F. 
Boyd, aldermen. In 1864, Phinehas J. Stone, mayor ; Andrew 
Sawtell, Francis Thompson, Anthony S. Morss, James F. Dwi- 
nell, Otis Little, Matthew H. Merriam, Joseph Lovett, Joseph 
F. Boyd, Oliver H. P. Smith, aldermen. In 1865, Charles Rob- 
inson, Jr., mayor; Edwin F. Adams, Robert Todd, John B. 
Wilson, William H. Kent, Samuel P. Langmaid, Liverus 
Hull, John F. Gilman, Jeremiah Prescott, Joseph Caldwell, 
aldermen. 

The city-clerk in 1861 was Charles Poole ; in 1862, 1863, 
1864, and 1865, Daniel Williams. The city-treasurer in 1861 
was James Bird ; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, Lowell W. Cham- 
berlain ; in 1865, Linus A. Pearson. 

1861. April 16th, The mayor was directed to tender to the 
Governor the use of the city hall, "or any other suitable public 
building," for the accommodation of troops ; also to cause the 
American flag to be hoisted upon the staff over the city hall 
until otherwise ordered. April 19th, The mayor called a 
special meeting of the city council, and sent in a message 
recommending the appropriation of ten thousand dollars in aid 
of the two Charlestown companies which had been ordered into 
active service, and the families of the members, to be expended 



394 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

under the direction of a committee of the council. October 
8th, The treasurer was directed to borrow, not exceeding six 
thousand dollars, for the payment of State aid to soldiers' 
families. 

1862. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
fifteen thousand dollars for State aid to soldiers' families, to be 
expended under the supervision of the "joint-standing commit- 
tee on finance." May 26th, Ten thousand dollars were appro- 
priated " to provide for the wants, and supply the necessities, of 
the soldiers and their families, who shall enter the service of the 
United States " under a recent call of the President. The city- 
clerk was directed to notify " the captains of the two companies 
of this city of the passage of this order ; " and the committee 
was authorized to make any arrangements they may deem 
proper for the departure of the companies to the seat of war. 
July 16th, Forty-two thousand dollars were appropriated to fill 
the quota of the city, amounting to four hundred and eight 
three-years men. August 29th, A special meeting of the 
council was called by the mayor, to consider matters relating 
to recruiting volunteers to fill the quotas of the city. He com- 
plained of the delay experienced in having the enlisted men 
mustered into service, which had been a great hindrance to 
recruiting. After the mayor's message was read, the council 
voted to pay each volunteer, who enlists for three years, a 
bounty of two hundred dollars, and to each nine-months volun- 
teer a bounty of one hundred dollars when mustered in and 
credited to the quota of the city. The city-treasurer was 
authorized to borrow sixty thousand dollars to pay said boun- 
ties. October 8th, Voted, to appoint two persons as agents to 
remain near to the Federal army, and to render all the assist- 
ance in their power to the sick and wounded soldiers belonging 
to Charlestown, and to make detailed reports from time to time 
of their doings. It was also voted to increase the bounty to 
nine-months volunteers to two hundred dollars. October 13th, 
The mayor communicated to the city council that the quotas of 
Charlestown had been filled. October 27th, Twenty thousand 
dollars were appropriated '' for the relief of soldiers and their 
families." 



CHARLE8T0WN. 395 

1863. March 3(], The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
six thousand dollars "to supply the deficiency in the amount 
expended in recruiting the city's quota of troops during the last 
year." September 21st, A memorial signed by Horatio Wel- 
lington and others was received, asking that the city purchase a 
lot in Woodlawn Cemetery for the burial of deceased soldiers 
belonging to Charlestown, the same to be "properly graded and 
adorned " ; referred to a committee. 

1864. April 11th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
not exceeding ten thousand dollars for the payment of bounties 
to volunteers under the new call of the President for more men. 
July 25th, Voted, to pay each person whose name " is borne 
upon the list of enrolled citizens subject to a draft," who shall 
enlist for three years, or shall procure a substitute for that term 
of service, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars , 
the same to be paid when the man is mustered in and credited 
to the quota of the city. The finance committee was authorized 
to borrow thirty-seven thousand five hundred dollars to pay the 
same. December 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for 
three years, eighty dollars for two years, and forty dollars for 
one year's service. 

1865. January 9th, Messrs. Kent, Wilson, and Oilman, of 
the aldermen, Messrs. Smith (of Ward 1), Lawrence, Dun- 
ton, Hatch, Stover, and Daniels of the common council, were 
appointed a committee to have the charge and superintend- 
ence of recruiting volunteers, and determine the amount of 
bounty to be paid, not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars to any one person ; and the treasurer, under the direc- 
tion of the finance committee, was authorized to borrow money 
to pay said bounties. The recruiting committee was authorized 
to employ a suitable person or persons to continue the correc- 
tion and revision of the United-States enrollment-list of Charles- 
town. January 16th, A series of resolutions in memory of the 
death of Hon. Edward Everett was read by Alderman Kent, 
and adopted, of which we copy the following : — 

Resolved y That the City Council of Charlestown have learned with 
unfeigned sorrow of the death of Hon. Edward Everett, which 



396 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

took place at his residence in Boston, Sunday morning, January 15th, 
at five o'clock. 

Resolved^ That in passing away even in the fullness of his years 
and crowned with distinguished honors, the State has lost one of its 
most illustrious ornaments, and the Republic one of its noblest and 
stanchest upholders and defenders, who, in the period of its greatest 
adversity, by his profound argument and wondrous eloquence brought 
conviction to the hearts of many who wavered, and held them to their 
faith in the justice of the cause and the ultimate triumph of the 
Republic, and whose counsel nerved and encouraged our rulers to per- 
severe in maintaining inviolable the great trust delegated to them by 
the people. 

A brief and feeling address was made by the mayor, and 
the resolutions were unanimously adopted. April lOtli, The 
Board of Aldermen met, but, in honor of the capture of Rich- 
mond and the surrender of General Lee's army, on motion of 
Alderman Adams, the Board adjourned without transacting any 
business. April 17th, On this day a meeting was held and the 
death of President Lincoln was officially announced by his 
Honor the Mayor. Resolutions appropriate to the occasion 
were read by Alderman Kent and unanimously adopted, one of 
which was as follows : — 

Resolved^ As a manifestation of our sorrow for this sad event and 
of respect for the memory of the great deceased, that the rooms of 
the City Council be draped in mourning for thirty days, and that on 
the day of the funeral His Honor the Mayor direct the schools to be 
closed, and request a suspension of business on the part of all our 
citizens, and that they assemble in their respective places of public 
worship to humble themselves before Almighty God, because of the 
great bereavement which is laid upon our nation. 

On the same day an order passed the Council to cease recruit- 
ing, the same being in accordance with orders received through 
Governor Andrew from the Secretary of War. 

Charlestown furnished four thousand three hundred and seven 
men for the war, whicli was a surplus of one hundred and 
eleven over and above all demands. One hundred and twenty- 
three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the city on account of the war 



CHARLESTOWN. 397 

was one hundred and sixty-eight thousand six hundred and 
fifty-four dollars and fifty cents ($168,654.50). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $10,348.57 ; in 
1862, $40,738.49 ; in 1863, $54,683.97 ; in 1864, $46,000.00; 
in 1865, $25,000.00. Total amount, $176,771.03. 

The ladles of Charlestown began their soldiers' work with the 
war. The Bunker-Hill Soldiers' Relief Society originated April 
19, 1861, and as it was undoubtedly the first which was organ- 
ized in the loyal States we propose, therefore, to give the names 
of its first oflBcers, as follows : President, Mrs. Horace G. 
Hutchins; vice-president, Mrs. William L. Hudson; secretary, 
Mrs. Henry Lyon ; treasurer. Miss Almena B. Bates. 

Executive committee, Mrs. Peter Hubbell, Mrs. George E, 
Ellis, Mrs. W. W. Wheilden, Mrs. James B. Miles, Mrs. T. 
T. Sawyer, Mrs. R. Williams, Mrs. George W. Little, Mrs. 
Richard Frothingham, Mr^. John Hurd, Mrs. George Hyde, 
Mrs. Arthur W. Tufts, Mrs. S. T. Hooper, Mrs. Frederick 
Thompson, Mrs. O. C. Everett. 

Committee on work. Miss Louisa Bray, Miss L. J. Walker, 
Mrs. S. T. Hooper, Mrs. Nathan Merrill, Mrs. B. Edmunds, 
Mrs. George Edmunds, Mrs. J. A, Bates, Mrs. C. S. Cartee, 
Mrs. Henry Edes, Miss Hannah Osgood, Miss Elizabeth Bray, 
Miss R. Edmunds. 

Mrs. President Hutchins, in her excellent address at the first 
annual meeting of the society April 19, 1862, says : " When, 
one year ago, we were all agitated and excited by the news of 
the rebellious attack made upon our government, feeling will- 
ing and anxious to do something, and yet not quite clear in 
our minds what our duty demanded of us, a young woman of 
our city, one of New England's active and spirited daughters, 
saw and pointed out a way in which we could render service in 
the noble cause without entrenching on the duties of others. 
It was proposed to form a society of the women of our city, 
for the purpose of rendering aid and sympathy to the families 
of the patriot soldiers who at the first call of their country 
left their peaceful homes for the untried duties of the camp and 



398 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

battlefield. The proposal met with a hearty response from all, 
and this society was at once organized." 

The Society had open weekly meetings at their rooms dur- 
ing the war to supply material for sewing. We have not 
received a complete statement of the work done by the Society 
during the period of its existence ; but taking the twelve months 
from April 19, 1863, to April 19, 1864, as a criterion of the 
whole, we may form a pretty accurate judgment of the good 
accomplished. During the months named the receipts of the 
Society in money amounted to four thousand four hundred and 
sixteen dollars and seventeen cents ; and there were forwarded to 
the front 402 flannel shirts, 369 cotton shirts, 271 pairs of flannel 
drawers, 212 pairs cotton drawers, 95 dressing-gowns, 156 jack- 
ets, 75 pairs pants, 15 vests, 43 pairs slippers, 47 caps, 622 cra- 
vats, 1,060 towels, 1,259 handkerchiefs, 70 flannel bands, 579 
arm-slings, 265 hair brushes, 902 combs, 21 needle-books, 1,189 
pairs of socks, 213 cans condensed milk, 79 cans coffee, 259 
lbs. farina, 166 lbs. corn starch, 130 maizena, 67 i gelatine, 59 
tea, 262 castile soap, 264 dried apple, 39 arrowroot, 25 sugar, 
(\iy cans of jellies, and preserves of different kinds ; oat meal, 
rice, 68 gallons old New-England rum, 10 gallons Jamaica 
rum, 10 bottles Jamaica rum, 64 bottles whiskey, 75 bottles 
brandy, 10 bottles Madeira wine, 23 bottles sherry, 20 bottles 
port, 32 bottles California, 4 bottles Isabella, 3 bottles black- 
berry, 3 bottles blueberry, 9 bottles elderberry, 4 bottles gin, 10 
bottles cherry-brandy, 10 bottles tamarinds, 22 bottles cider, 211 
bottles cologne, 83 bottles lemon syrup, 62 bottles raspberry, 
12 bottles ginger, 10 bottles bjiy rum, 6 bottles lavender water, 
10 bottles pickles, 12 sets knives and forks, 11 waiters, 5 coffee 
pots, 75 plates and saucers, 15 pitchers, 2 salts, 3 sieves, 8 
sugar bowls, 25 tin mugs, 150 spoons, 615 fans, 16 holders, 
124 hospital pillows, 1 air pillow, 45 hair rings, 2 nurse lamps, 
115 pamphlets, 75 bound volumes, 135 checkerboards, 94 boxes 
dominos, 60 jetcs-harpsj 36 solitaire boards, 36 wire puzzles, 20 
miscellaneous games, 8 Bibles, 11 Testaments, 7 books of psalms ; 
bandages, lint, linen, and cotton rags ; files of the Atlantic 
Monthly, of Putnam's Magazine, Harper's Monthly, Religious 
Monthly, Godey's Ladies' Book, New York Ledger, Peterson's 



CHELM8F0RD. 399 

Magazine, New- York Independent. The money-value of the 
contributions made by the ladies, and received through their 
exertions, was probably not far from fifty thousand dollars. 
The city has taken measures to erect a splendid monument in 
honor of the soldiers and sailors of Charlestown who died in the 
war. 

Chelmsford. — Incorporated May 29, 1655. Population in 
1860, 2,291; in 1865, 2,296. Valuation in 1860, $1,371,- 
136 ; in 1865, $1,546,508. , 

The selectmen in 1861 were J. R. Fletcher, Christopher 
Roby, Elisha Shaw.* In 1862, J. R. Fletcher, Elisha Shaw, 
Edmund F. Dupee ; in 1863, Elisha Shaw, E. F. Dupee, 
Joseph Reed; in 1864 and 1865, Joseph Reed, E. F. Dupee, 
N. B. Edwards. 

The town-clerk from 1836 to 1871 was E. F. Webster. The 
town-treasurer from 1842 to 1868 was Joseph Manning. 

1861. April 29th, A town-meeting was held, at which it 
was voted that H. W. B. Wightman, Joseph Manning, Chris- 
topher Roby, William Fletcher, and H. B. Proctor be a 
Committee to consider and report what action the town shall 
take to sustain the Government. The Committee reported in 
favor of raising a military company, the members of which be 
required ** to drill two afternoons in each week " for two months, 
and each member to be paid five dollars a month ; that the town 
furnish each with the usual arms and equipments ; also ** that 
the town furnish a capable drill-master." Three thousand dol- 
lars were voted to aid the families of volunteers from the town, 
and eight dollars a month to be paid to each volunteer while 
in actual service. November 5th, Voted, that the action of the 
selectmen in providing aid to the families of volunteers be 
approved, and they were instructed to pay to other towns the 
expenses incurred by them in aiding the families of Chelmsford 
volunteers living therein. 

1862. July 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each person who should volunteer for 

* Mr. Roby enlisted in the military service in 1862. 



400 MASSACHUSETTS IK THE REBELLION. 

three years' service to the quota of the town. August 25th, 
The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and fifty dolhirs to each volunteer for nine months' service, ^ not 
exceeding forty in all," provided that "twenty-five dollars shall 
be deducted from all those who may so enlist, after twelve 
o'clock at noon on Tuesday next." September 29th, The town 
voted to continue to pay one hundred and fifty dollars to volun- 
teers for nine months' service. 

1863. March 2d, The selectmen were authorized to give 
such assistance to the families of volunteers as they might think 
proper, this to be in addition to the aid allowed by law. «Tune 
8th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow a sum not exceed- 
ing one thousand dollars for the benefit of the families "of 
deceased or disabled soldiers." 

1864. March 7th, It was voted to continue paying aid to 
the families of soldiers in the service, and to those soldiers who 
may have been discharged for wounds or sickness. April 11th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town until March 
1, 1865. The selectmen assumed the responsibility of paying 
this bounty in gold or its equivalent, so that the bounty actually 
paid to each volunteer, in currency, was three hundred and 
eighteen dollars. Their action was subsequently approved by 
the town. 

Sevenil other meetings were held at which means were taken 
to recruit volunteers to keep the quota of the town full until the 
end of the war. 

Chelmsford furnished for the war two hundred and forty-nine 
men, which was a surplus of twenty-nine over and above all 
demands. Five were commissioned officers. The total amount 
of money raised and expended by the town for war purposes, 
exclusive of State aid, was twenty-seven thousand six hundred 
and twenty-three dollars ($27,623.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended during the war 
for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the Com- 
monwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $390.92; in 1862, 
$2,725.66; in 1863, $3,491.00; in 1864, $4,194.20; in 
1865, $3,766.04. Total amount, $14,567.82. 



CX)NCORD. 401 

Concord. — Incorporated Sept. 2, 1635. Population in 
1860, 2,246; in 1865, 2,231. Valuation in 1860, $1,663,- 
507; in 1865, $1,658,881. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Ephraim W. Bull, B. N. 
Hudson, Nathan H. Warren; in 1862 and 1863, Addison G. 
Fay, Elijah Wood, Nathan B. Stowe; in 1864 and 1865, 
Nathan B. Stowe, Elijah Wood, Benjamin Tolman. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was George 
Hey wood. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Julius M. Smith ; 
in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, George Heywood. 

1861. The first war-meeting held in Concord was a popular 
citizens' meeting held on the 19th of April, the day on which 
the Concord Company G, Fifth Regiment Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Militia, left for Washington. At this meeting a fund of 
five thousand dollars was raised by subscription in aid of the 
company and their families, which it was voted should be dis- 
tributed by George M. Brooks, Louis A. Lurette, and George 
Heywood. The first legal town-meeting was held on the 13th 
of June, at which one thousand dollars were appropriated for 
State aid to the families of volunteers ; and a vote was passed 
to purchase, at the expense of the town, a suitable uniform for 
a new company which had been raised in the town, whenever it 
should be ordered into actual service. 

1862. A legal town-meeting was held on the 14th of July, 
at which three thousand dollars were appropriated to pay boun- 
ties to volunteers who should enlist for three years' service, to 
fill the quota of the town under the recent call of the President, 
and to assess the same **upon the inhabitants, and be payable 
on the first day of August next." Another town-meeting 
was held on the 27th of August, at which it was voted to pay 
a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who should 
enlist in the Concord Company then being recruited for nine 
months' service, and the selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money to pay the same. Two days after, namely, on the 29th 
of August, a citizens' meeting was held, at which Louis A. 
Lurette, George M. Brooks, Julius M. Smith, and A. G. Fay 
were appointed a committee to aid in recruiting volunteers to 

fill the quota of the town. This committee raised by private 

26 



402 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

subscription twenty-two hundred and twenty-five dollars, to be 
expended in adding to the bounty legally authorized to be paid 
bv the town. 

1863. So far as the transcript of the town records which 
we have received shows, no action was taken by Concord, in 
its corporate capacity, during this year in relation to the war, 
though we believe citizens' meetings were held, and recruiting 
and the payment of State aid were continued. 

18()4. A legal town-meeting was held on the 20th of 
December, when it was voted to assess and raise by tax three 
thousand dollars for recruiting purposes, which sum was to be 
collected and paid over to the town-treasurer on or before the 
15th of January, 1865 ; and the treasurer was authorized to 
borrow money sufficient to fill any quota, ** provided the amount 
to be raised by taxation should be inadequate." 

Concord furnished two hundred and twenty-nine men for 
the war, which was a surplus of twelve over and above all 
demands. Twenty-five were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was seven thousand 
five hundred dollars. Ten thousand dollars were raised by pri- 
vate subscription, making a total of seventeen thousand five 
hundred dollars ($17,500.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was 
reimbursed by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$504.94; in 1862, $1,968.55; in 1863, $3,668.00; in 1864, 
$1,770.60 ; in 1865, $1,146.60. Total amount, $9,058.69. 

'*The ladies of Concord did very much through their Sol- 
diers' Aid Society in providing for our companies, and they 
sent much clothing and hospital stores for general use. I have 
no doubt two thousand dollars were subscribed for these pur- 
poses, and it was expended under their direction." 

Dracut. — Incorporated Feb. 26, 1701. Population in 1860, 
1,881; in 1865, 1,905. Valuation in 1860, $962,723; in 
1865, $1,109,304. 

The selectmen in 1861 were George W. Coburn, Josiah 



* 

A 



DRACUT. 403 

Ames, Joseph B. V. Coburn; in 1862 and 1863, George W. 
Coburn, Joseph B. V. Coburn, Ira Hall ; in 1864, Atkinson 
C. Varnum, Charles A. Hamblett, Levi F. Jones; in 1865, 
George W. Coburn, Joseph B. V. Coburn, Levi F. Jones. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Henry 
Richardson. The town-treasurer during the same period was 
Jesse Swain. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act upon matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 6th of May, at which it 
was voted " to pay each man belonging to Dracut who has gone, 
or may go, to assist the Government of the United States " in 
the maintenance of the Union, ten dollars a month while in the 
military service, to be paid either to the soldier himself or to 
his family or relatives. One thousand dollars were appropriated 
to pay the same, and two thousand dollars *^to raise and equip 
a military company in Dracut." November 5th, The action 
of the selectmen in paying Edward Coburn thirty dollars was 
approved, he having been wounded in the march of the Sixth 
Regiment through Baltimore on the 19th of April. 

1862. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
whatever amount of money was necessary for the payment of 
State aid to the families of volunteers. July 21st, The select- 
men were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three 
years' service and be credited to the quota of the town. August 
25th, A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be 
paid to each volunteer for nine months' service. 

1863. February 20th, The treasurer was authorized to bor- 
row money for the payment of State aid during the year to the 
families of soldiers. 

1864. July 11th, The treasurer was directed to borrow, 
not exceeding four thousand dollars — the rate of interest not to 
exceed six per cent — for the payment of bounties to volunteers 
enlisting to the credit of the town upon any call of the Presi- 
dent for men, " after the 1st of March, 1864, and before the 
1st of March, 1865," each volunteer to receive one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars. August 9th, It was voted to pay 
the bounty in gold^ and the treasurer was authorized to bor- 



404 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

row an additional sum of eleven hundred and twenty-five 
dollars. 

Dracut fumislied two hundred and eighteen men for the war, 
which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. 
One was a commissioned officer. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was seventeen thousand six hundred and 
sixteen dollars ($17,616.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $380.37 ; in 1862, 
$2,439.82 ; in 1863, $3,069.45 ; in 1864, $2,604.71 ; in 1865, 
$2,100.00. Total amount, $10,594.35. 

Dunstable. — Incorporated Oct. 15, 1673. Population in 
1860, 487 ; in 1865, 533. Valuation in 1860, $397,551 ; in 
1865, $391,146. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Isaac Kendall, James M. Swal- 
low, Ashur G. Jewett; in 1862, James T. Burnap, James M, 
Swallow, Daniel Swallow ; in 1863, Andrew Spaulding, Ben- 
jamin French, Thomas H. Parkhurst; in 1864, Benjamin 
French, Thomas H. Parkhurst, Andrew Spaulding ; in 1865, 
Thomas H. Parkhurst, Benjamin French, Libni Parker. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was James T. Burnap ; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, James C. Woodward. The town- 
treasurer during all the years of the war was Libni Parker. 

1861. No legal town-meeting to act upon matters connected 
with the war appears to have been held during this year. 

1862. July 26th, The town-treasurer was authorized to 
borrow (if necessary) five hundred dollars, to pay a bounty of 
one hundred dollars to each of the five volunteers for three years' 
service, to fill the quota of the town, who shall enlist before the 
15th of August. September 19th, The treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow whatever amount of money may be necessary 
to pay State aid to the families of soldiers residing in the town ; 
also to borrow not exceeding two thousand dollars to pay boun- 
ties to volunteers. November 4th, The treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow money to pay bounties to volunteers for nine 
months' service. 



FRAMINQHAM. 405 

1863. March 2d, A similar vote was passed in regard to 
paying bounties " to complete the quota of the town ;" also, to 
authorize the treasurer " to settle the volunteer bounty tax with 
the Treasurer of the Commonwealth by securing the balance due 
the town." 

18 64. April 23d, Voted, to raise four hundred and fifty 
dollars to reimburse individual citizens who had contributed 
money to fill the quota of the town in 1863, and the selectmen 
were authorized to keep on recruiting to fill any quota until 
March, 1865 ; the bounty not to exceed one hundred dollars. 

1865. November 7th, Voted, "to refund the money paid by 
subscription in 1864 for the purpose of filling the town's quota 
under the call of the President, June 16th, 1864." 

Dunstable furnished seventy-two men for the war, which was 
a surplus of ten over and above all demands. There were no 
commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropri- 
ated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive 
of State aid, was twelve thousand seven hundred and twenty-five 
dollars and seventy-nine cents ($12,725.79). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $00 ; in 1862, 
$108.00; in 1863, $268.00; in 1864, $506.00; in 1865, 
$517.61. Total amount, $1,399.61. 

Framingham. — Incorporated June 25, 1700. Population 
in 1860, 4,227 ; in 1865, 4,681. Valuation in 1860, $2,208,- 
537; in 1865, $2,799,308. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Joel Edmunds, Albert G. Gibbs, 
Owen W. Livermore ; in 1862, Albert G. Gibbs, Alexander 
R. Esty, Gilman Fuller; in 1863 and 1864, Alexander R. 
Esty, Gilman Fuller, Francis C. Stearns ; in 1865, Francis C. 
Stearns, Theodore C. Hurd, Andrew Coolidge. 

The town-clerk during all of these years was Charles S. Whit- 
more. The town- treasurer for the same period was George 
Phipps. 

1861. When the tidings were received of the attack upon 
the Seventh Regiment, in passing through Baltimore on the 



406 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

19th of April, many of the young men of Framingham enrolled 
themselves in the active militia, and by the end of April a fiill 
company was neariy raised. The first legal town-meeting to act 
upon matters relating to the war was held on the 6th of May, 
at which the following preamble, resolution, and votes were 
passed : — 

Whereas a grave and extraordinary emergency now exists, whereby 
the security of our beloved Government is threatened by a portion of 
the people who are bound and sworn to support, defend, and obey it ; 
and, 

Whereas in the prosecution of its designs, the rebellious portion 
have resorted to the employment of armed force, have unlawfully and 
forcibly seized, and do now hold, much property belonging to the 
common Government, and do generally disown and set it at defiance ; 
therefore — 

Besolved, That we, the citizens of Framingham are ready to main- 
tain our loyalty to the Government made by the sacrifice of the blood 
and treasure of our fathers, and handed down to us as a sacred and 
inestimable gift, under which we have enjoyed all the blessings which 
make life happy ; and we have assembled together this day to take 
such measures as lie in our power to assist in preserving and main- 
taining for ourselves and our children this goodly heritage. 

The town appropriated eight thousand dollars to provide suit- 
able outfits for the soldiers belonging to Framingham, and to 
furnish proper aid to their families while absent in the military 
service, and a large committee was chosen to take charge of the 
expenditure of the money. 

1862. July — , A meeting of citizens was held, at which a 
committee was chosen to raise by subscription a fund from which 
to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who 
should enlist for three years to fill the quota of the town under 
the call of the President for three hundred thousand men. 
(Forty-seven citizens contributed forty-seven hundred dollars, 
and paid out the same in bounties. ) In August, another call 
having been made by the President for three hundred thousand 
nine-months men, a legal town-meeting was held on the Ist 
of September, at which it was voted to raise eighteen thousand 
dollars for the payment of bounties to men enlisting to fill the 



FRAMINGHAM. 407 

quota of the town, and to refiind the money voluntarily contrib- 
uted by the forty-seven citizens to the amount of forty-seven 
hundred dollars. September 3d, A meeting of the subscribers 
to the volunteer bounty fund was held, at which they voted that 
the money refunded by the town should be placed in the hands 
of C. C. Esty, Oliver Bennett, Albert Ballord, Wm. H. Carter, 
and Francis Jaquith, to be expended at their discretion **for 
the promotion of enlistments, and for the relief of the soldiers 
and their families." 

1863. March — , The selectmen were directed to cause to be 
brought home and to be interred the bodies of all volunteers 
belonging to Framingham who may have died or shall hereafter 
die in the service of the country, the ^ expenses of which to be 
borne by the town ;" and the trustees of the Edgell Grove Cem- 
etery were directed to set apart a suitable lot, to be called " the 
soldiers' lot." 

The town continued to recruit men, pay bounties and aid to 
soldiers' families, in accordance with the votes of the citizens 
passed at meetings held at various times, until the close of the 
war. 

Framingham furnished four hundred and twenty-six men for 
the war, which was a surplus of nineteen over and above all 
demands. Nine were commissioned officers. The total amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-one thousand one hun- 
dred and forty-nine dollars and twenty-nine cents ($31,149.29). 
This is exclusive of $29,142.50 raised by voluntary subscription 
and paid into the recruiting and bounty funds. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town during 
the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $458.81 ; in 1862, 
$3,251.48; in 1863, $5,083.40; in 1864, $6,200.00 ; in 1865, 
$4,800.00. Total amount, $19,793.69. 

The Ladies* Auxiliary Association of the Sanitary Commis- 
sion was organized June 23d, 1862. Weekly sewing-meetings 
were held from that time till July, 1865. As the result of these 
labors one hundred and twenty boxes were forwarded to the 
army, filled with bandages, lint, under-clothing, and other 



408 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

necessaries and comforts for the sick and wounded in the 
hospitals. 

Groton. — Incorporated May 29, 1655. Population in 
1860, 3,193 ; in 1865, 3,176. Valuation in 1860, $1,465,408 ; 
in 1865, $1,553,920. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Phinehas G. Prescott, William 
H. Harlow, Willard Torrey ; in 1862 and 1863, Eliel Shum- 
way, William H. Harlow, Willard Torrey; in 1864 and 1865, 
Eliel Shumway, Willard Torrey, George W. Stuart. 

The town-clerk during all these years was George D. Brig- 
ham. The town-treasurer during the same period was Alden 
Warren. 

1861. A town-meeting was held April 29th, at which a 
series of patriotic resolutions were read and adopted, and the 
citizens pledged ''their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred 
honors in defence of the Government and the preservation of the 
Constitution." It was voted to aid the families of the volun- 
teers who were already at the front, and of those who would 
follow, and a sufficient amount of money was voted for that 
purpose. A thousand dollars were appropriated to cjothe, uni- 
form, and provide for the soldiers in the Groton Company in 
the Sixth Regiment, already in the service, and such as might 
afterwards enlist. 

1862. July 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars each to thirty-two men who shall enlist for three years 
to the credit of the town. August 25th, Voted, to pay the 
same amount to men enlisting for nine months. September 6th, 
The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist in the Sixth Regiment 
for nine months to the credit of the town. September 13th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each of sixty- 
five men, if that number is required to fill the quota of the town. 

A. S. Lawrence, Colonel Walter Shattuck, George E. Jones, 

B. L. Howe, and J. Todd were chosen to act with the select- 
men as a recruiting committee. October 13th, The selectmen 
reported that the quotas of the town were one hundred and 
eighty-seven men, and that the town had then in the military 



GROTON. 409 

service one hundred and twenty-five three-years volunteers, 
forty-eight nine-months, and eighteen enlisted but not mus- 
tered in. 

18G3. April 6th, The selectmen were authorized to use 
such sums as were necessary for aid to the families of volun- 
teers. July 20th, They were directed to pay the same aid to 
the families of drafted men. November 23d, Charles H. 
Waters, B. L. Howe, Henry Butterfield, David McCaine, 
George W. Fiske, and Alonzo Simmons were chosen a com- 
mittee to act with the selectmen in recruiting men to fill the 
quota of the town, and seven hundred dollars were appropri- 
ated for expenses. December 1st, Voted, that a sum not less 
than forty-five hundred, and not more than five thousand, dol- 
lars be placed at the disposal of the selectmen to obtain thirty- 
four recruits. 

1864. April 4th, Voted, to raise two thousand dollars to 
refund to citizens the money they had voluntarily advanced for 
recruiting purposes, and nine hundred dollars to fill up the 
present demand upon the town for men ; also five thousand 
dollars to pay aid to families of soldiers. May 30th, The 
selectmen were directed to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, and the same amount to 
each drafted man, or to a drafted man who procures a substi- 
tute, and is credited to the town. "Voted, that the selectmen 
be instructed to see that the town is not subject to a draft for 
the one man now due." 

1865. July 3d, Voted, that the town refund to its citizens 
the money they have voluntarily advanced to aid recruiting, 
which amounted in gross to upwards of six thousand dollars. 
J. M. Hollingsworth furnished two, and Eliel Shumway one 
" representative recruit," for which they paid a bounty of one 
hundred dollars to each. 

Groton furnished four hundred men for the war, which was 
a surplus of forty-nine over and above all demands. Twenty- 
four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
raised and appropriated by the town for war purposes, exclusive 
of State aid, was thirty-one thousand seven hundred and twenty- 
four dollars and forty-seven cents ($31,724.47). 



410 MAS8AOHUSETT8 IN THE BEBELLION. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $1,113.99 ; in 
18G2, $3,873.55 ; in 1863, $4,196.69; in 1864, $3,373.97; 
in 1865, $2,400.00. Total amount, $14,958.20. 

HoLLiSTON. — Incorporated Dec. 3, 1724. Population in 
1860, 3,339; in 1865, 3,125. Valuation in 1860, $1,483,- 
443; in 1865, $1,502,682. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Sylvanua Pond, 
Ebenezer Kimball, S. Morse Cutter ; in 1863, S. Morse Cut- 
ter, William E. Thayer, Sydney Wilder ; in 1864, L. Leland, 
B. A. Bridges, Thomas E. Andrews ; in 1865, L. Leland, B. 
A. Bridges, F. O. Paddleford. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was George N. Pond ; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, J. M. Batchelder. The town-treasurer 
in 1861 was George N. Pond ; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, 
George B. Fiske. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to act on matters in 
relation to the war, was held on the 29th of April, at which 
Aldcn Leland, Elbridge J. Cutter, Abel Pond, James F. 
Simons, and Seth Thayer were appointed to " superintend the 
equipment of a military company in Holliston ; " and Seth 
Thayer was authorized to receive and disburse, under direction 
of the committee, such sums as may be subscribed and paid for 
the above-named purpose. Five thousand dollars were appro- 
priated "for military purposes." A large committee was ap- 
pointed "to report a plan for the support of the families of 
soldiers," who reported that " four hundred dollars be appropri- 
ated for drilling the company," and, when called into active 
service, each single man should receive a bounty of twelve, and 
each married man a bounty of twenty dollars. The use of the 
town-hall was given to the company for drilling purposes, and 
the "upper hall for an armory." Certain tents belonging 
to the town were given to the company. September 30th, 
Voted, to give one dollar a month for the wife, and fifty cents 
for each child, of a volunteer belonging to the town, in addition 
to the State aid allowed by law. 



H0LLI8T0N. 411 

1862. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years in the mili- 
tary service to fill the quota of the town. The following reso- 
lutions were passed : — 

Resolved^ That we, the citizens of Holliston, in town meeting assem- 
bled, send greeting to our brothers in arms, wherever serving on land or 
sea ; that we are proud of the men who went forth, that we recog- 
nize the patriotism of their sacrifice, that we sympathize in their toils 
and privations, that we exult in their heroism on the battle-field, that 
we will emulate their example. 

Resolved, That to the relatives of Sergeant Elbridge G. Whiting, 
and of privates Caleb C. Waite, Albert G. Hunting, and James W 
Speakman, who fell in the fight before Richmond, we offer respectful 
and afiectionate sympathy ; that the death of these men was the death 
of brave men; that we will hold them in tender recollection, and 
inscribe their names as most honorable in the records of the town. 

August 25th, A bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars was 
directed to be paid to each volunteer for nine months' service, 
and their families be allowed the same amount of State and town 
aid that is paid to the families of three-years volunteers. 

1863. July 22d, Voted, unanimously, that the families of 
citizens or of aliens living in Holliston, serving in the army 
either as drafted men or as substitutes, shall be paid the same 
aid as is paid to the families of volunteers ; also, that the fami- 
lies of those who have fallen be paid the same amount as before 
until the receipt of pensions. 

1864. March 7th, The selectmen were authorized to pay one 
dollar a month to mothers and fifty cents to sisters of volunteers 
in addition to that paid to their families. March 28th, Voted, 
to reimburse to citizens money contributed by them for recruit 
ing purposes. June 20th, The treasurer was authorized to pay 
a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 
teer or drafted man when mustered in and credited to the town, 
and to borrow three thousand dollars to pay the same. It was 
also voted to give the Holliston Company a '^ suitable reception 
upon their return home." 

1865. November 7th, The selectmen were directed to provide 
for the ** necessities of the families of men who have died in the 



412 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBEIXION. 

service.'* November 27th, Voted, to refund to citizens all money 
paid by them for recruiting purposes. 

In 1866 the town paid each volunteer who had received no 
bounty one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and to those who 
had received less than that sum sufficient to make it up to that 
amount. A soldiers' monument was erected by the town, of 
Concord granite, at a cost of three thousand dollars. 

Plolliston furnished three hundred and sixty-four men for the 
war, which was a surplus of thirty-three over and above all 
demands. Eight were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was forty thousand 
six hundred and twenty-two dollars and eight cents ($40,622.08). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid to soldiers' families during the war, and repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,738,84; in 
1862, $6,840.71; in 1863, $5,567.62; in 1864, $6,333.54; 
in 1865, $4,200.00. Total amount, $25,680.71. 

The ladies of Holliston were unceasing in their good works 
for the soldiers during the entire war. The money value of 
their contributions was more than thirty-five hundred dollars. 
A balance of forty dollars remained in their hands at the end of 
the war, which was given to embellish the grounds of the sol- 
diers' monument. 

HOPKINTON. — Incorporated Dec. 13, 1715. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 4,340; in 1865, 4,140. Valuation in 1860, 
$1,308,099; in 1865, $1,595,257. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Nathan P. Coburn, Eliakim A. 
Bates, David Eames, Otis L. Woods; in 1862, 1863, and 
1864, Nathan P. Coburn, Eliakim A. Bates, Gardner Parker, 
Charles P. Morse, Thomas Mead; in 1865, Eliakim A. Bates, 
Erastus Thompson, Thomas Mead, Charles Seaver, Marcus C. 
Phipps. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863, was Joseph A. 
Tillinghast; in 1864 and 1865, J. Augustus Woodbury. The 
town-treasurer during all the years of the war was Jonathan 
Whittemore. 



HOPKINTON. 413 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held April 29th, at which Nathan P. 
Coburn, Alonzo Coburn, William A. Phipps, Clement Meserve, 
and John A. Phipps were appointed to consider and report what 
should be done by the town " to aid in the defence of the nation." 
The committee reported, "That the town appropriate a sum not 
to exceed five thousand dollars, to be expended for the purpose 
of organizing and drilling military companies for the national 
defence." The report was accepted, and the money appropriated, 
Lee Claflin, William A. Phipps, Albert Wood, Charles P. Morse, 
and Thomas Mead were chosen a committee to superintend the 
expenditure of the money. 

1862. July 17th, Voted, to pay a bounty of fifty dollars to 
each volunteer for three years' service to the number of forty- 
seven, to fill the quota of the town. Oh the 18th of August 
the bounty was increased to one hundred dollars, and on the 
18th of September the same bounty was authorized to be paid 
to volunteers for nine months' service, and to pay the men 
Government pay from the time they enlist until they are mus- 
tered into service. 

1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town in 
its corporate capacity during this year, although recruiting was 
continued as usual. 

1865. April 11th, Voted, to pay one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town 
for three years' service, to continue until March 1st, 1865. It 
was also voted to pay the same bounty to drafted men. 

Hopkinton furnished four hundred and twenty-five men for 
the war, which was a surplus of sixteen over and above all de- 
mands. Three were commissioned oflicers. The total amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty thousand dollars 
($30,000.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $1,499.03 ; in 1062, 
$6,572.11; in 1863, $8,178.71; in 1864, $8,600,00; in 
1865, $5,000.00. Total amount, $29,849.85. 



414 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Lexington. — Incorporated March 29, 1712, Population 
in 18G0, 2,329 ; in 18(55, 2,223. Valuation in 1860, $1,873,- 
634; in 1865, $1,747,459. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Charles Hudson, 
Webster Smith, William H. Smith ; in 1863 and 1864 Web- 
ster Smith, William H. Smith, Hammon Reed ; in 1865, 
Hammon Reed, Alonzo Goddard, Eli Simonds. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was A. W. 
Bryant. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863 was 
Charles Nunn ; in 1864, J. A. Damon ; in 1865, L. A. 
Saville. 

1861. At a legal town-meeting held on the 30th of April, 
the following resolution preceded by a preamble was unani- 
mously adopted : — 

Resolved^ That it is the duty of all good citizens to obey the call of 
the Goverument, and Hock to the standard of our coimtry, and thus 
preserve our glorious Constitution, under which we have enjoyed 
greater blessings than have ever fallen to the lot of any other people ; 
and to show our devotion to our free institutions and our just apprecia- 
tion of the patriotism of the young men who are willing to respond to 
their country's call, it is — 

Voted, That a sum not exceeding four thousand dollars be appro- 
priated from any money in the treasury, to be expended under the 
direction of a committee of ten for the purpose of clothing or other- 
wise encouraging the gallant men who may enter the service, and for 
the support of those who may have families dependent upon their labor 
during the period for which they are called into service." 

The following gentlemen were appointed the committee : 
Charles Tidd, S. W. Smith, Loring S. Pierce, W. D. Phelps, 
C. K. Tucker, W. W. Keith, Winslow WeUington, Eli 
Simonds, R. W. Reed, and Charles Hudson. The committee 
were directed to pay ten dollars a month to single men, and 
fifteen dollars a month to those who have families, during active 
service ; also suitable compensation while drilling. Lexington 
men who enlisted in other towns, if not paid by them, were to 
receive the same amounts. November 5th, State aid was 
directed to be paid to the families of volunteers as provided by 
the State law ; but in any event they should receive sufficient *' to 
make them entirely comfortable." 




LEXINGTON. 415 

1862. July 19th, The following resolution and vote were 
passed : — 

Resolved, That whereas the town of Lexington was the first to seal 
her devotion to Freedom and Equal Rights in 1775, and the blood of 
her slaughtered citizens cries to us from the ground to sustain the 
cause for which they offered themselves a living sacrifice; and as 
every citizen is under the most sacred obligation to bear his share, if 
not in the perils, yet in the burdens and sacrifices of the righteous 
contest, and is bound to encourage, support, and sustain those who 
obey their country's call, and manfully enroll themselves in defence of 
our dearest rights and privileges ; it is therefore — 

Voted^ Unanimously, that a bounty of one hundred dollars be 
offered to each and every patriotic soldier who will volunteer into the 
service of the United States for the period of three years to fill the 
quota of twenty men required of this town. 

August 29th, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars 
to each volunteer for nine months' service, when mustered in 
and credited to the quota of the town. 

1863. July 23d, The selectmen were directed to make suit- 
able provision for the support and comfort of the families of 
volunteers. November 3d, The assessors were authorized to 
abate the taxes of all Lexington soldiers in the military service. 

1864. April 4th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for 
three years, and be credited to the quota of the town from 
March 1, 1864, to March 1, 1865 ; and the selectmen were 
authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 

1865. May 29th, Voted, to raise by taxation four thousand 
dollars to reimburse citizens who had contributed money to 
encourage recruiting to fill the quotas of the town. 

Lexington furnished two hundred and twenty-five men for 
the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all demands. 
Seven were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was twenty-five thousand three hundred 
and thirty-seven dollars ($25,337.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the four years of the war for State aid to the families of 



416 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

soldiers, and which was afterwards repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows: In 1861, $603.39; in 1862, $2,237,29; in 
1863, $3,056.32; in 1864, $2,677.95 ; in 1865, $1,546.12. 
Total amount, $10,121.07, 

The Ladies' Soldiers-Aid Society raised by fairs and other 
means two thousand four hundred and fifty-four dollars and 
fifty-one cents, which was expended in the purchase of material 
to be made into under-garments for the soldiers, and for lint, 
bandages, and other articles for the sick and wounded in hospi- 
tals. Twenty-one boxes and eight barrels were sent to hospitals 
near Washington, ten boxes and six barrels to Alexandria, Va., 
and other parcels to other places. 

Lincoln. — Incorporated April 19, 1754. Population in 
1860, 718; in 1865, 710. Valuation in 1860, $539,528: in 
1865, $606,833. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 were William 
F. Wheeler, Charles L. Tarbell, Amos Hagar, Jr. ; in 1865, 
William F. Wheeler, Amos Hagar, Jr., George Flint. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Henry L. 
Chapin ; the town-treasurer for the same period was William F. 
Wheeler. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters 
relating to the war was held on the 13th of May, at which it 
was voted to appropriate two thousand dollars to provide for 
bounty, "extra pay, arms, ammunition, clothing and provisions 
to such of the inhabitants of Lincoln as have enlisted, or mav 
hereafter enlist, in the military service of the United States, and 
for aid to their families." It was also voted that two hundred 
and fifty dollars of the above sum " be assessed the present year, 
and that the selectmen and town-treasurer be authorized to bor- 
row not exceeding seventeen hundred and fifty dollars." 

1862. July 28th, On motion of C. L. Tarbell, voted, that 
eighteen hundred dollars be raised " to pay nine men who may 
enlist as our quota as soldiers in the service of the United States 
of America," and that eighteen hundred dollars be forthwith 
assessed on the taxable property of the town, and as much of 
it as may be necessary be expended by the committee appointed 



LINCOLN. 417 

at a citizens' meeting in securing said recruits; and ''that all 
persons be requested to pay the same to the collector on the 
presentation of their bills on or before the first day of Septem- 
ber next, and that interest of one per cent a month be charged 
on all taxes assessed under this vote, from the first day of Sep- 
tember until paid." August 25th, Voted to pay each volunteer 
who shall enlist for nine months, and be mustered in and credited 
to the quota of the town, a bounty of two hundred dollars, and 
the same committee which recruited the volunteers for three 
years' service be requested to recruit the nine-months men. 

1863. March — , Six hundred dollars were appropriated for 
the payment of State aid to soldiers' families. November — , 
The treasurer was instructed to settle with the State Treasurer 
for the proportion of Lincoln of the volunteer bounty tax as 
authorized by law. 

1864. April 25th, Fourteen hundred dollars were appro- 
priated to refund money " raised by individual subscription, and 
paid for recruiting ten volunteers sometime during last Decem- 
ber and January, — the money to be paid as soon as there is 
sufficient in the treasury for that purpose." Seven hundred 
dollars were also appropriated " to pay the veteran volunteers 
belonging to the town of Lincoln." June 13th, Samuel H. 
Pierce, William F. Wheeler, and Francis Smith were appointed 
a committee to recruit " eight men, at least, to serve the town 
as volunteers," and the treasurer was authorized to borrow 
twenty-five hundred dollars for the purpose, to be used by the 
committee. 

1865. October 21st, Voted to reimburse to citizens the 
money subscribed and paid by them " last spring " for procuring 
recruits to fill the quota of the town ; also, voted to pay back 
all the money which W. L. G. Pierce, who had been drafted 
into the military service, " has paid for war taxes on his property 
since July, 1863, up to the time of his discharge." 

1866. March — , Voted, to pay the expenses of embalming 
and bringing home the body of Lieutenant Thomas J. Parker.* 

* Mr. Parker was First Lieutenant in the Twenty-Eighth Regiment Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers ; and was mortally wounded in front of Petersburg, Va., 
March 25, 1865. 

27 



418 MASSAOHU8ETT8 IN THE REBELLION. 

A great many citizens' meetings were held during the war, 
and the votes recorded above are little more than the embodi- 
ment in legal form of those passed at those meetings. As 
regards resolutions, Mr. Wheeler, one of the selectmen, writes : 
^' I do not think that any were passed except at one of the earlier 
meetings of citizens. The feeling of the people, I suppose, 
was typified by a remark of one of the older citizens : ' We do 
not want any more resolutions ; but if anybody has got any 
money or any pluck let him show it.' " 

Lincoln furnished seventy-nine men for the war, which was a 
surplus of four over and above all demands. Five were com- 
missioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was ten thousand three hundred and eighty-five dol- 
lars and fifty cents ($10,385.50).* 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and which 
was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$llf).20; in 1862, $591.42; in 1863, $815.00; in 1864, 
$1,029.54; in 1865, $650.00. Total amount, $3,205.16. 

The ladies of Lincoln did good service during the war. Mrs. 
Edward S. Hodges, president of the Soldiers' Aid Society, has 
written us a most excellent letter, from which we have only space 
for the following extracts : — 

'^ However small our work really was it always seemed to be sancti- 
fied and ennobled by the^ blessed spirit which prompted its undertaking, 
and which kept alive to the last hour of our need the earnestness so 
noticeable in a New England community. From the first call to arms, 
which summoned away the men and boys from among us, we realized 
that there might be needed hospital comforts for which our government, 
under its long peace, would not have provided ; and immediately we 
called ourselves together, feeling sure we could render some help under 
the pressure. The vestry of the Orthodox church was opened to us, 
and the earnest encouragement of every citizen of the town was ours.'* 

" Very soon a society was founded called the * Soldiers' Aid,' and 
in the Town Hall organized work commenced. Money was raised by 

* Lincoln claims the distinction of having been the first town in the State to 
have paid off its war debt. 



LITTLETON. 419 

subscription in the churches. Gifts of materials on which to employ 
the ready hands of women and children were brought, and the work 
was begun in earnest, never to be laid aside until there was no further 
usefulness in it. The meetings were regular, the temper of them 
always good, and the unity of feeling which brought persons of vary- 
ing faith close together in this great work was beautt/uL From time 
to time, as it was required, money was raised by fairs, tea-parties, and 
tableaux, and while there was much pleasure felt by us all in these 
social gatherings the solemn refrain rang through the merriments. 
Repeatedly cases containing the result of our labors of love were sent 
to private hospitals; but for the last years they were put into the 
hands of the Sanitary Commission." 

Littleton. — Incorporated Dec. 3, 1715. Population in 
1860, 1,063; in 1865, 9G7. Valuation in 1860, $666,270; 
in 1865, $632,380. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John F. Robbins, 
John Cutter, James A. Parker; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, 
Joseph A. Priest, William Kimball, George W. Sanderson. 

The town-clerk in 1861, and all through the war, was 
William Kimball. The town-treasurer in 1861 was William 
Chamberlain; and in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Luther 
White. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting, to consider matters 
relating to the war, was held on the 1st of May, at which it 
was voted to raise by taxation one thousand dollars, and to 
authorize the selectmen to borrow two thousand, "if needed," 
to pay each soldier belonging to the town ten dollars a month 
while in the service, " and to provide for their families." July 
— , Richard Hall, Francis P. Knowlton, Thomas S. Tuttle, 
and Benjamin Edwards were chosen to act with the selectmen 
in the expenditure of the money appropriated at the previous 
meeting. 

1862. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer for three years' service, when mustered 
in and credited to the town ; also the two dollars bounty allowed 
by the United States. 

1863. August 26th, The bounty was raised to one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars. It was also resolved that the town- 



420 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

clerk keep a record of the names of volunteers belonging to 
the town, together with the company and regiment to which 
each belonged, and the date of muster, discharge, and death. 
Voted, to " pay the expense of the return of the body of the 
late Nahum W. Whitcomb, and of interring the same." On 
motion of Francis P. Knowlton, the following preamble and 
resolution were unanimously adopted : — 

Whereas Mr. Nahum H. Whitcomb, a soldier from this town in the 
Sixth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, departed this life on the 
13th of December, 1862, at Suffolk, Va., while in the service of our 
country, and his remains brought to this place for interment ; there- 
fore — 

Resolved, Tliat we tender our sympathy to his afflicted friends, and 
as mourners with them for one of our number, who in early manhood 
has laid his life upon the altar of his country, wo pledge ourselves 
anew to that cause for which he so nobly gave his life. 

It was also voted that the clerk communicate the resolution 
to the family of the deceased. Littleton continued recruiting 
and paying bounties until the end of the war. 

The whole number of men furnished by the town for the war 
was one hundred and seventeen, which was a surplus of eighteen 
over and above all demands. Two were commissioned officers. 
The total amount of money appropriated and expended by 
the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid,** was 
eleven thousand one hundred and four dollars and thirty-three 
cents ($11,104.33). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and 
repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$102.06; in 18G2, $935.92; in 1863, $1,155.11; in 1864, 
$578.38 ; in 1865, $450.00. Total amount, $3,221.47. 

Lowell. — Incorporated as a town, March 1, 1826; 
as a city, April 1, 1836. Population in 1860, 36,827 ; in 
1865, 31,004. Valuation in 1860, $20,894,207; in 1865, 
$20,980,041. 

In 1861, Benjamin C. Sargeant, mayor; Samuel T. Mana- 
han, Jonathan P. Folsom, James Watson, William G. Morse, 



LOWELL. 421 

Hocum Hosford, Aldis L. Waite, Sager Ashworth, William 
S. Gardner, aldermen. In 1862, Hocum Hosford, mayor ; 
Mertoun C. Bryant, Edwin A. Alger, James B. Francis, 
William A. Burke, Isaac F. Scripture, Aldis L. Waite, Albert 
Wheeler, Jonathan P. Folsom, aldermen. In 1863, Hocum 
Hosford, mayor ; James B. Francis, Edwin A. Alger, Abiel 
Pevey, William A. Burke, Isaac F. Scripture, Otis Allien, 
Albert Wheeler, William Nichols, aldermen. In 1864, Hocum 
Hosford, mayor ; William S. South worth, James B. Francis, 
Dana B. Gove, William T. McNeill, George W. Norris, 
George Runels, Cyrus H. Latham, George F. Richardson, 
aldermen. In 1865, Josiah G. Peabody, mayor; Edward 
F. Watson, George W. Morris, Dana B. Gove, William T. 
McNeill, Henry H. Wilder, Josiah Gates, Cyrus H. Latham, 
William Brown, aldermen. 

The city-clerk during all the years of the war was John H. 
McAlvin. The city-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, 
was George W. Bedlow; * in 1865, Thomas G. Gerrish. 

1861. January 5th, A national salute was ordered to be 
fired on the 8th of January in commemoration of the battle of 
New Orleans, Jan. 8, 1815, and in honor of " Major Anderson 
and his brave command at Fort Sumter." January 21st, The 
services of the several military companies were tendered to 
the Governor, should troops be called for by the President. 
April 15th, The Sixth Regiment having been ordered to Wash- 
ington, formed in Lowell, where it was addressed by leading 
citizens, and then proceeded to Boston. April 18th, Eight 
thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to the soldiers' fami- 
lies. The national flag was ordered to be displayed upon the 
public buildings. April 19th, Authority was given to gentle- 
men to organize new military companies. The attack upon 
the Sixth Regiment in Baltimore caused intense excitement in 
Lowell. New companies were immediately filled to the maxi- 
mum. On the 21st, Sunday, "war sermons were preached in 
the churches." May 1st, Ten thousand dollars were appropri- 



* Mr. Bedlow was treasurer until June 80, 1864. Thomas G. Gerrish was 
immediately chosen to succeed him and entered upon liis duties July 1, 1864. 



422 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

ated ^^ to uniform nnd equip the several companies of volun- 
teers, now or hereafter raised in this city." May 3d, A special 
committee was appointed " to receive the remains of the two 
Massachusetts soldiers (Ladd and Whitney) belonging to 
Lowell, who fell at Baltimore, and to make all necessary ar- 
rangements for the final disposition of their bodies, with such 
funeral obsequies as they may deem proper." The funeral of 
these, " the first martyrs " of the Rebellion, took place on the 
6th of May, and was very largely attended. The funeral 
address was made by Rev. W. R. Clark, and the bodies were 
buried in the Lowell cemetery.* May 14th, Five hundred 
dollars were appropriated to supply the wants of volunteers 
who were soon to be ordered into active service. June 11th, 
Five hundred dollars were appropriated " for the relief of the 
Hill Cadets and the Butler Rifles." August 2d, The Sixth 
Regiment arrived home after its service of three months and 
had a public reception by the citizens. September 5th, Major- 
General Butler received a public reception on his return home 
after the capture of Fort Hatteras. September 10th, Ten 
thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers* families. 
On the 26th of November five thousand dollars, and on the 
24th of December fifteen hundred dollars, were appropriated 
for the same purpose. 

1862. January 3d. More money was appropriated for the 
families of volunteers. February 17th, One hundred guns were 
fired in honor of the capture of Fort Donelson. February 
25th, A resolution passed allowing aid to be paid to the rela- 
tives and families of volunteers who are not included in the 
State law ; also to volunteers '* who have enlisted and gone from 
the city." March 25th, Twenty-five thousand dollars were 
appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. July 17th, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volun- 
teer who shall enlist for three years and be credited to the 
quota of the city ; on the 22d ten dollars additional were ad- 
ded, f August 18th, Forty thousand dollars were appropriated 

* They have since been removed and placed beneatli the monument erected 
to their memory in the centre of Lowell, by the city and the State, 
t The quota of three-years men required of Lowell under this call was three 



LOWELL. 423 

for aid to families of soldiers, and a bounty of fifty dollars 
was authorized to be paid to each volunteer for nine montlis* 
service. 

1863. March 17th, Sixty thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated for aid to soldiers' families. July 7th, A salute was fired 
in honor of the national victory at Gettysburg ; the next even- 
ing the city was illuminated, fire-works discharged, and a con- 
gratulatory speech was made by General Butler. July 21st, 
Two thousand dollars were appropriated ** for a monument to 
Luther Ladd and Addison O. Whitney (who fell in Baltimore, 
April 19th, 1861), to be erected in some public place in this 
city, under the direction of the Governor in connection with 
a joint special committee of the city council. 

1864. On the 1st of February, Lowell had furnished her 
full complement of men under every call of the President, and 
had a surplus of thirteen. July 18th, Lowell was required to 
furnish six hundred and twenty-seven men under a recent call 
of the President. July 26th, Voted, to pay each volunteer for 
three years' service, when mustered in and credited to the quota 
of the city, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars in 
ffoldj or its equivalent. The Sixth Regiment volunteered its 
services for one hundred days' service, being the fourth time it 
had been placed in service. 

1865. April 5th, A mass meeting was held to rejoice over 
the fall of Richmond. On the 10th, another meeting was held 
to rejoice over the surrender of General Lee and his army. 
On the 15th, information of the assassination of President Lin- 
coln was received, which caused gladness to be turned to sor- 
row. The flags were placed at half mast, and emblems of 
mourning were everywhere displayed. The dedication of the 
monument erected to the memory of Ladd and Whitney was to 
have taken place on the li^th, the fourth anniversary of their 
heroic death ; but at the request of Governor Andrew, who was 
to deliver the address, it was postponed on account of the 

hundred and ninety-seven. A public meeting was held July 12, wliich was 
addressed by the mayor, the adjutant-general of the State, and many promi- 
nent citizens of Lowell. The men were soon obtained. Lowell claims to have 
been the Jirst city to have furnished its quota. 



424 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

death of the President until the 17th of June, the anniversary 
of the battle of Bunker Hill. 

On the occasion of the dedication of the monument the people 
of Lowell and of the surrounding towns observed it as ajholi- 
day. The mills were stopped, the stores closed, and business 
of every kind was at a stand. The day was very warm, the 
procession very full, and the route very long. The address of 
Governor Andrew was of great merit. 

Lowell furnished five thousand two hundred and sixty- 
six men for the war, which was a surplus of two hundred and 
eighteen over and above all demands. Two hundred and six- 
teen were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended on account of the war, exclusive of 
State aid, was three hundred and nine thousand two hundred 
and forty-two dollars and thirty-nine cents ($309,242.39). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the city 
during the war for State aid to soldiers families, and repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $20,276.24 ; 
in 1862, $87,239.31; in 1863, $90,000.00; in 1864, $85,- 
000.00 ; in 1865, $52,000.00. Total amount, $334,515.55. 

The ladies of Lowell formed a " Soldiers' Aid Society " as 
early as April 20, 1861, which continued in vigorous action 
until the end of the war. A fair held in April, 1863, under 
the management of the ladies netted five thousand dollars. A 
great many boxes of clothing and sanitary stores were sent 
almost daily through the agencies of the Sanitary and Christian 
Commissions to the soldiers in camp and in the hospitiils. We 
have not been able to get an exact statement of the value of the 
articles thus furnished, but good judges estimate that one hun- 
dred thousand dollars were raised in Lowell during the four 
years of the war by voluntary contributions for the Sanitary 
and Christian Commissions, and for private relief connected 
with the war. It is claimed tiiat Judge Crosby of Lowell 
gave the first money ($100) in aid of the soldiers (April 18, 
1861) that was given anywhere. His example was followed 
by other generous citizens, among them General Butler, who 
gave his check for five hundred dollars. 



MALDEN. 425 

Malden. — Incorporated May 2, 1649. Population in 
1860, 5,865 ; in 1865, 6,871. Valuation in 1860, $3,366,963 ; 
in 1865, $4,040,431. 

The selectmen in 1861 were John S. Rice, Henry H. Hyde, 
Paschal P. P. Ware; in 1862, Hubbard Russell, Henry H. 
Hyde, John S. Nichols; in 1863, Hubbard Russell, John Fen- 
derson, Samuel Shute ; in 1864, Hubbard Russell, John Fen- 
derson, Samuel Shute, John H. Abbott, Edward Fuller; in 
1865, John H. Abbott, Samuel Shute, Elisha B. Loring. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was A. F. 
Sargent. The town-treasurer during the same period was 
Henry A. Newhall. 

1861. A citizens' meeting was held on the 20th of April, 
the day after the attack upon the Sixth Regiment in Baltimore, 
at which it was — 

Besolved, That we believe it to be the duty of every lover of his 
country and his race to assist in crushing out the Rebellion and 
treason now existing in the Southern States. 

Resolved, That the town of Maiden, true to its ancient history, will 
furnish the men and means to the extent of her ability for this object ; 
and we recommend the immediate formation of a company of volun- 
teer militia to aid in preserving the Government of the United 
States. 

Messrs. J. H. Abbott, George D. B. Blanchard, J. S. Rice, 
Paschal P. P. Ware, M. Crocker, and L. L. Fuller were 
appointed a committee " to raise funds and appropriate the same 
for uniforms and other articles necessary for the comfort'of the 
volunteers." J. S. Rice was appointed treasurer ; the amount 
of money subscribed and paid was twenty-five hundred and 
twenty-six dollars and six cents, all of which was properly 
expended. 

The first legal town-meeting was held on the 1st of May, at 
which ten thousand dollars were appropriated to be expended 
under the direction of the selectmen, and a committee of seven 
citizens, for "the comfort and support of the families of those 
who have been or may be called into the naval or military ser- 
vice of the United States, and who shall be inhabitants of 
Maiden." 



426 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

1862. July 16th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist 
for three years' military service, and be credited to the quota of the 
town. David L. Webster, Rev. Gilbert Haven, and thirty others 
were chosen to assist the selectmen in recruiting. July 26th, 
A citizens' meeting was held, at which upwards of twenty-seven 
hundred dollars were subscribed by inhabitants of the town to 
encourage recruiting. A. D. Lamson was chosen treasurer. 
August 11th, At a legal town-meeting the treasurer was author- 
ized to borrow two thousand dollars to be used by the recruiting 
committee " as in their judgment may best promote the enlist- 
ment of men to fill the quota of the town." August 27th, 
The bounty to volunteers for nine months' service was fixed at 
one hundred dollars, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow 
ten thousand dollars for that purpose. 

Active measures were taken by the town all through the war 
to enlist volunteers and keep the quota of the town filled. 

Maiden, according to the returns made by the selectmen in 
1866, furnished five hundred and sixty-seven men for the war, 
which is at least seventy-five less than the actual number, as at 
the end of the war it had a surplus of seventy-one over and 
above all demands. Sixteen were commissioned officers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town 
on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was sixty thou- 
sand and eighty.five dollars ($60,085.00).* 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which 
was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$2,600.00; in 1862, $7,561.20; in 1863, $8,907.13 ; in 1864, 
$8,000.00; in 1865, $4,800.00. Total amount, $31,868.33. 

The ladies of Maiden were extremely active and liberal during 

* April 28th, 1861. Company K, of the Seventeenth Regiment Massachusetts 
Volunteers, attended divine service at Rev. Mr. Reed's church. After the sermon 
each member was presented with a New Testament. May 26th, They attended 
Rev. Mr. Greenwood's church, and were presented with a silk banner valued at 
sixty dollars. Previous to leaving town for camp at Lynnfield, on the 9th of 
July, religious ceremonies were held in the town hall by the different clergymen 
of Maiden. Each of the commissioned officers was presented with a sword, 
belt, and a revolver, valued at $123.50. 



MARLBOROUGH. 427 

all the years of the war in their good works for the soldiers, and 
forwarded to the seat of war great quantities of hospital stores, 
under-clothing, bedding, lint and bandages, and other necessary 
articles for the comfort of the sick and wounded. 

Marlborough. — Incorporated May 31, 1660. Population 
in 1860, 5,911 ; in 1865, 7,209. Valuation in 1860, $1,876,- 
599 ; in 1865, $2,530,622. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Isaac Hayden, B. F. Underbill, 
Stephen Morse, George E. Manson, John Goodale ; in 1862 
and 1863, B. F. Underbill, William H. Wood, John F. Cot- 
ting ; in 1864 and 1865, William Wilson, Frederick H. Morse, 
Charles H. Robinson. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was John Phelps ; in 1863, 

1864, and 1865, Edward L. Bigelow. The town-treasurer in 
1861 was Winslow M. Warren; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 

1865, N. Wetherbee. 

1861. A town-meeting was held April 29th. Hollis Loring 
presented a preamble setting forth in patriotic language the trea- 
sonable conduct of the Southern secessionists, and a resolution 
to support the Government with their lives and fortunes. Hollis 
Loring, L. E. Wakefield, O. W. Albee, Samuel Boyd, and 
Edward Walker were appointed to consider and report what 
action the town should take in the existing crisis. This com- 
mittee reported that the sum of ten thousand dollars be appro- 
priated as a war fund, to be placed at the disposal of ten citizens, 
for the aid of the volunteers from that town who had enlisted or 
might hereafter enlist, and their families. The above-named 
gentlemen were selected as part of the committee ; and M. Fay, 
William H. Wood, Stephen Morse, Elbridge House, and Fran- 
cis Brigham were chosen to complete the committee of ten. 
The treasurer was authorized to borrow ten thousand dollars, 
and hold the same subject to the orders of the committee. July 
13th, The selectmen were directed to pay aid to the families of 
volunteers in accordance with a recent act of the Legislature. 

1862. April 7th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
six thousand dollars for aid to the fiimilies of volunteers. July 
21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twent^^-Ave 



428 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town, and 
the selectmen were authorized to borrow six thousand five 
hundred dollars for that purpose. At this meeting a series of 
excellent resolutions were presented by O. W. Albee, which 
were unanimously adopted. They set forth, first, that the citi- 
zens of Marll)orough would stand firm in support of the Govern- 
ment ; second , that if slavery stands in the way of a successful 
prosecution of the war then slavery must perish ; third, was 
complimentary to the volunteers, native and adopted, who had 
enlisted from the town ; fourth, that the names of Casey and 
Reagan, who had died on the battlefield, would always be grate- 
fully cherished by the people of Marlborough ; fifth, that it was 
the duty of the citizens to respond to every call of the President 
for men ; sixth, that although patriotism can neither be weighed 
nor measured by money, yet the town would compensate, in 
part at least, the pecuniary sacrifices of the volunteers at the 
front. August 21st, A bounty of one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars was authorized to be paid to each volunteer for nine 
months' service, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money to pay the same. 

1863. August 10th, Voted, to borrow not exceeding five 
thousand dollars for aid to the families of volunteers or drafted 
men residing in the town. 

1864. March 7th, Voted, that the selectmen give aid to the 
relatives of soldiers, "within the spirit and scope of the law.'* 
April 4th, Voted, to borrow ten thousand dollars to pay aid to 
the families of enlisted men ; also, that ten thousand dollars be 
raised by taxation to refund to citizens money which they had 
advanced for recruiting purposes. June 8th, The selectmen 
were authorized to appoint three agents to look after the sick and 
wounded soldiers from that town, and to provide at the expense 
of the town for the return of the bodies of those citizens who have 
died or may die in the military or naval service. June 18th, 
The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit 
of the town, and to borrow a suflScient sum of money to pay the 
same ; the amount thus borrowed to be raised by taxation at 
the next annual assessment. December 9th, The selectmen 



MEDFORD. 429 

were directed to continue recruiting, in anticipation of another 
call for men by the President, and to pay the same bounties. 

1865. March 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
not exceeding fifteen thousand dollars for aid to the families of 
volunteers. 

Marlborough furnished seven hundred and thirty-one men for 
the war, which was a surplus of twenty-eight over and above all 
demands. Twenty-one were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money raised and expended by the town for war 
purposes, exclusive of State aid, was fifty-one thousand five 
hundred and eighty-four dollars and eleven cents ($51,584.11). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to the families of soldiers, and which 
was repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$3,179.37; in 1862, $9,147.30 ; in 1863, $9,941.78 ; in 1864, 
$14,400.00 ; in 1865, $8,700.00. Total amount, $45,368.45. 

Medford. — Incorporated Sept. 28, 1630. Population in 
1860, 4,842 ; in 1865, 4,860. Valuation in 1860, $4,978.071 ; 
in 1865, $5,491,054. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Albert H. Butters, Joshua T. 
Foster, E. Boynton, Jr. ; in 1862, E. Boynton, Jr., Charles 
S. Jacobs, Francis E. Foster ; in 1863, Albert H. Butters, 
Alvah N. Cotton, William B. Thomas ; in 1864^ Nathan W. 
Bridge, John P. Perry, At wood Litchfield, Jr., Charles Currier, 
Charles Russell, Henry M. Wild, Francis H. Kidder ; in 1865, 
Nathan W. Bridge, John P. Perry, Charles Currier, Charles 
Russell, Joshua Clark, Parker R. Litchfield, Elbridge Teel. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Joseph 
P. Hall; in 1865, Parker R. Litchfield. The town-treasurer 
during all of these years was George B. Green. 

1861. A meeting of citizens was held on the 18th of 
April, at which the following preamble and resolutions were 
adopted : — 

Whereas the President of the United States has called upon all true 
and loyal citizens to aid and support the General Government, and to 
protect the property and enforce the laws thereof; and whereas the 
Governor of this Commonwealth has called upon our friends and 



430 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

fellow citizens to do their duty as patriots and soldiers; therefore 
be it — 

Resolved^ By us, the citizens of Medford, that we will, to our utmost 
ability, assist in the preparation and outfit of those who have gener- 
ously volunteered their services to fight for the good cause, and glor- 
ious Union. 

Resolved^ That we will regard the wives and families of those who 
go forth to battle as a sacred trust, to be religiously respected and pro- 
tected. 

Resolved, That a committee of thirteen be appointed by this meet- 
ing to raise funds and appropriate the same to these object^.* 

The first legal town meeting was held on the 13th of June, 
at which five thousand dollars were appropriated for State aid 
to the soldiers' families. 

1862. July 2l8t, A bounty of one hundred dollars was 
directed to be paid to each volunteer to the number of one hun- 
dred and one, who shall enlist within two weeks, for three 
years, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. 
August 4tli, A resolution was passed approving of the new call 
for three hundred thousand more men, and earnestly requesting 
the President to prosecute the war with vigor, and " to use all 
rebel property within the reach of our armies for their Support, 
and all the slaves of the rebels to preserve the lives and preserve 
the health of our soldiers." August 11th, The following reso- 
lution was passed : — 

Resolved, That, having merged all political parties into one great 
war party, we expect our Governments, State and National, to prose- 
cute the war with the utmost vigor, and to use all the means at their 
command to bring it to a speedy and successful conclusion. 

A resolution in favor of employing colored regiments was 
offered but was indefinitely postponed, and one heartily approv- 
ing *' the course of the present administration " was adopted. 

* The citizens responded with great liberality. Immediate measures were 
taken to procure an outfit for the " Lawrence Light Infantry," which formed 
part of the Fifth Kegiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, which left for 
Washington on the 21st of April, under command of Colonel Samuel C. Law- 
rence (who lived in Medford), for three months' service. This regiment was in 
the first battle of Bull Run, and behaved bravely, when the Colonel was slightly 
wounded. 



MELROSE. 431 

1863. November 3d, The selectmen were authorized to open 
a recruiting office, and to pay a bounty of two hundred dollars 
to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be credited 
to the quota of the town. They were also requested to call 
public meetings to encourage recruiting, and to petition his 
Excellency the Governor to call an extra session of the Legisla- 
ture to pass a law legalizing the payment of bounties to volun- 
teers, under the last call of the President. A committee was 
appointed to raise by subscription " a guarantee fund to secure 
the payment of bounties in case it cannot be legally paid by the 
town." 

1864. March 7th, The selectmen were requested "to con- 
sider and report some place to perpetuate the memory of those 
who have fallen or may hereafter fall in defence of our Union ; " 
also, " to pay whatever in their judgment is necessary for the 
support of families of volunteers, without regard to what the 
State may allow.*' 

Medford furnished five hundred and fifty-seven men for the 
war, which was a surplus of sixty-one men over and above all 
demands. Twenty-one were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifty-six thou- 
sand and ninety-nine dollars and eighty cents ($56,099.80). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
the payment of State aid to soldiers' families during the war, 
and repaid by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, 
$1,076.46; in 1862, $7,655.17; in 1863, $12,412.37; in 
1864, $10,000.00; in 1865, $6,400.00. Total amount, 
$37,544.50. 

Melrose. — Incorporated May 3, 1850. Population in 
1860,2,532; in 1865, 2,866. Valuation in 1860, $1,373,324; 
in 1865, $1,704,583. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863, were John H. Clark, 
George M. Fletcher, William B. Burgess ; in 1864, John H. 
Clark, William E. Puller, William B. Burgess ; in 1865, Win- 
gate P. Sargent, George M. Fletcher, Isaac Emerson, Jr. 

The town-clerk during the years 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 



432 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

was Edward R. Knights ; in 1865, Stinson Sewell. The town- 
treasurer during 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Caleb How- 
ard ; in 1865, David Fairbanks. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters con- 
nected with the war was held on the 6th of Mav, at wliich three 
thousand dolhirs were appropriated for aid to the families of 
volunteers, and to purchase necessary equipments for citizens 
who should enlist in the military service ; to each of whom with 
a family the monthly sum of fifteen dolLars was paid by the town, 
and to single men ten dollars a month while in the military ser- 
vice. The town-treasurer was authorized to borrow the monev, 
and John II. Clark, William B. Burgess, and George M. 
Fletcher were appointed to superintend the disbursement of the 
money. 

1862. July 14th, A citizens' meeting was held to adopt 
measures to fill the quota of the town under a late call of the 
President for three hundred thousand men. A proposition was 
adopted, that "enough of the citizens of the town to fill the 
quota then and there pledge themselves either to enlist or fur- 
nish substitutes." Nineteen gentlemen signed the pledge. July 
28th, A legal town-meeting was held, which confirmed the 
proceedings of the citizens' meeting. A bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer for three years' service was directed to 
be paid by the selectmen when mustered in and credited to the 
quota of the town. Two hundred dollars were appropriated to 
pay expenses of recruiting, and a committee was appointed to 
aid the selectmen in filling the quota of the town. Henry A. 
Norris offered fifty dollars to the first five men who would enlist. 
Daniel W. Wilcox offered to pay ten dollars to each of the next 
ten men who would enlist, and N. B. Bryant the same amount 
to each person who would sign the enlistment roll that evening. 
An adjourned meeting was held on the evening of the 2d of 
August, at which patriotic speeches were made by distinguished 
gentlemen. The effect of these meetings speedily filled the 
quota of the town. August 21st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one 
hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer who enlists for nine 
months' service, when mustered in and credited to the town. 
Three hundred dollars were appropriated for recruiting ex- 



NATIOK. 433 

penses, and a committee of twenty-five was appointed to aid 
recruiting. 

Meetings were held during the years 1863, 1864, and 1865, 
at which committees were appointed to aid the selectmen in 
recruiting volunteers, and money was appropriated for the pay- 
ment of bounties, and of State aid to the soldiers' families. A 
well-written and handsomely printed volume, prepared by 
Elbridge H. Goss, entitled "The Melrose Memorial," contains a 
very full and complete history of Melrose in the war, which is 
in every respect creditable to the author and to the citizensof 
the place. 

Melrose furnished four hundred and sixteen men for the war,* 
which was a surplus of seventy-three over and above all demands. 
Nine were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was thirty-eight thousand five hundred 
and ninety-two dollars and seventy cents ($38,592.70). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $747.63 ; in 1862, 
$4,110.17; in 1863, $6,500.00; in 1864, $4,700.00 ; in 1865, 
$3,900.00. Total amount, $19,957.80. 

The ladies of Melrose performed a great deal of good work 
for the soldiers during the war, and a very considerable amount 
of money was collected in the various churches for the Christian 
and Sanitary Commissions, and for the soldiers directly. 

Natick. — Incorporated , 1762. Population in 

1860, 5,515 ; in 1865, 5,220. Valuation in 1860, $1,788,549 ; 
in 1865, $1,841,121. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 were Willard 
Drury, William Edwards, C. B. Travis ; in 1865, C. B. Travis, 
Jackson Bigelow, Dexter Washburn. 

The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was Henry Coggin ; in 
1863, 1864, and 1865, George L. Sleeper. The town-treasurer 
during all of these years was Nathaniel Clark. 

* The " Melrose Memorial " claims that Melrose furnished four hundred and 
fifty -four men for the war. 

28 



434 MAS8AGHUSETT8 IN THE REBELLION. 

18G1. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters 
relating to the war was held on the 29th of April, at which five 
thousand dollars were appropriated, to be expended under the 
direction of the selectmen for the benefit of soldiers* families. 
May 7th, The selectmen were authorized to expend one thousand 
dollars for a uniform to be given to the ^ Natick Mechanic Rifle 
Company.*' They were also authorized to purchase for the use 
of the company certain tents belonging to the Woburn Phalanx. 
Messrs. Hobart Moore, Charles Bigelow, and William Nutt, a 
committee appointed at a previous meeting, reported in favor of 
furnishing each soldier with a rubber blanket and a pair of 
woollen stockings, and each commissioned oflicer and musician 
with a revolver, when called into active service. The report 
was accepted, and five hundred dollars were appropriated to 
carry its recommendations into effect. July 17th, The treasurer 
was authorized to borrow ten thousand dollars for State aid to 
soldiers' families during the year ; also, fourteen hundred dollars 
for payment of expenses already incurred and " contracts hereto- 
fore made." 

1862. April 7th, The selectmen were instructed to borrow 
whatever money might be required for the payment of State aid 
to soldiers' families during the year, and to exceed the amount 
allowed by law to a family if in their judgment it was best so to 
do. July 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and 
fifty dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years 
and be credited to the quota of the town. August 30th, The 
same bounty was authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine 
months' service, and the treasurer was directed to borrow money 
to pay the same. 

1863. April 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow 
money for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families, and to 
exceed the amount allowed by law in cases wherein it would be 
proper. 

1864. April 1st, The bounty to volunteers who should there- 
after enlist for three years' service, and be credited to the quota 
of the town, was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 
May 23d, Voted, to pay the same bounty to men who may be 
drafted, and to re-enlisted veterans who should be credited to 



NEWTON. 435 

the quota of the town. The treasurer was authorized to borrow 
money to pay the same. 

Natick furnished about six hundred and twenty-five men for 
the war, which was a surplus of fifty-five over and above all 
demands. Thirty were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-eight 
thousand five hundred and seventy-five dollars and twenty-nine 
cents ($38,575.29).* 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $3,188.39 ; in 1862, 
$10,473.01; in 1863, $13,559.75; in 1864, $15,000.00 ; in 
1865, $7,600.00. Total amount, $49,821.15. 

The ladies of Natick, like their sisters in other towns, were 
generous in their labors in behalf of the soldiers. They sent a 
number of boxes filled with articles of comfort to the hospitals. 
Among the articles which they contained were 196 shirts, 215 
pairs of drawers, 91 dressing gowns, 357 handkerchiefs, 99 
towels, etc. The money value of the contributions was nearly 
eighteen hundred dollars. 

Newton. — Incorporated Dec. 15, 1691. Population in 
1860, 8,382; in 1865, 8,978. Valuation in 1860, $7,146,- 
081 ; in 1865, $9,800,738. 

The selectmen of the town during the entire war were 
Thomas Rice, Jr., Samuel F. Dix, F. A. Collins, Orrin Whip- 
ple, J. F. C. Hyde. 

The town-clerk during the same period was Marshall S. 
Rice, and the town-treasurer was Edward J. Collins. 

1861. On the day the Massachusetts Sixth Regiment (April 
19th) was attacked in Baltimore, the selectmen issued a war- 
rant for a town-meeting to be held on the 29th, to see what^ 
action the town would take in regard to the war. At that 
meeting D. H. Mason introduced a series of resolutions, with 

* This is exclusive of $5,000 expended in building a handsome monument 
in honor of the soldiers of Natick who died in the war, which is placed on the 
north side of the Common, and was dedicated July 4th, 1867. 






436 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

a preamble, setting forth the actual state of the country, and 
the determination of the town to do every thing in its power 
to support the Government. The selectmen were directed " to 
take and appropriate from any money at that time in the treas- 
ury of said town during the current year a sufficient sum, not 
exceeding twenty thousand dollars, to fully arm and equip in 
the most approved and effectual manner one company or more 
of volunteer militia who have enlisted, or may hereafter enlist, 
from said town in the service of the United States." The 
families of the enlisted men were to be provided with " all the 
needed and necessary comforts of life in sickness and in health, 
as long as the exigency requires ; " and if any of the soldiers 
should die in the service, the '' town will tenderly care for their 
remains, and furnish them a suitable burial." It was also re- 
solved, unanimously, that the people of Newton "have the 
most perfect faith and confidence in our present form of Govern- 
ment, and in the wisdom and patriotism of its framers ; and that 
without distinction of party or party lines, in our heart of hearts 
we revere and love their virtues and their memories. The 
cause of this Union is our cause ^ and to its support, with a firm 
reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we pledge our 
lives, our fortunes and our sacred honors." The resolutions 
were discussed by Mr. Mason, J. Wiley Edmunds, Andrew 
H. Ward, Jr., William Mcintosh and others, and unanimously 
adopted. It was also voted that T. M. Bryan, Jr., E. W. 
Dennison, and J. C. Potter, Jr., be a committee, in connec- 
tion with the selectmen, to furnish uniforms, arms, and under- 
clothes for the volunteers. A paper was also read, signed by 
fourteen of the most esteemed and influential ladies of the town, 
tendering: their services to make the under-clothin<; for the 
soldiers, which was properly considered. The selectmen were 
authorized to pay to each volunteer from the town a sum not 
exceeding twenty dollars a month, in addition to Government 
pay while in the service ; also to pay to the families of those 
citizens of Newton who have gone into other companies, the 
same monthly allowance as those who have enlisted in the New- 
ton Company. The meeting dissolved, after which three cheers 
were given for the Union, and three for the Newton Company. 



NEWTON. 437 

June 11th, A town-meeting was held. The selectmen reported 
they had expended twelve hundred dollars in aid of the com- 
pany raised in Newton, but had failed to have it accepted, and 
that there was no prospect that it would be accepted " for a year 
to come." (At this time the Secretary of War, Mr. Cameron, 
thought he had troops enough.) The selectmen were au- 
thorized to pay from the treasury of the town all obligations 
entered into by the town with said company, up to that date. 
The thanks of the town were voted "to the patriotic young 
men who had so nobly come forward and offered their services ; ^ 
also to the selectmen for their wise and prudent management in 
the work of recruiting. 

18G2. In town-meeting, November 4th, Voted, to approve 
the action of the selectmen in obtaining volunteers to fill the 
quota of the town, to assume all liabilities contracted by them 
in holding meetings and paying bounties, and that the sum of 
forty thousand dollars be appropriated for that purpose. Two 
thousand dollars were also appropriated to pay the expenses 
of burial of all soldiers belonsrinff to the town who die in the 
service, three hundred dollars to relieve " extraordinary neces- 
sities " of Newton soldiers at the front, two thousand dollars 
" to relieve the necessities of discharged and returned soldiers," 
two thousand dollars for the recovery of the bodies and the 
burial of deceased soldiers, " including what had already been 
paid for such purpose," and one thousand dollars for the support 
of the families of inhabitants of Newton serving in the United- 
States navy. 

18G3. At a special town-meeting held August 7th, it was 
voted that the balance of money appropriated to families of 
volunteers at a former meeting " be now appropriated to fami- 
lies of drafted men ; " also that the selectmen be authorized to 
borrow five thousand dollars to aid the families of the soldiers ; 
also to aid the families of deceased or disabled soldiers of New- 
ton. After the business named in the warrant was completed, 
an informal meeting was held ; a large committee was appointed 
to consider the expediency of erecting a monument in memory 
of the soldiers of Newton who had died, or who might there- 
after die, in the service of their country. 



438 BIASSAOHUSETTS IN THE BEBELUON. 

1864. At the annual town-meeting held March Tth, the 
town voted to appropriate fifteen thousand dollars for aid to 
the families of volunteers. April 4th, Eight thousand dollars 
were voted to meet the expenses incurred in recruiting ; and a 
further sum of fifteen thousand dollars was appropriated to 
meet expenses which may be incurred during the year in recruit- 
ing volunteers and paying bounties. August 5th, A committee 
of five was appointed to canvass the town and ascertain how 
many persons there were who were liable to be drafted, and to 
solicit subscriptions from all persons ; and any person drafted 
and held to service, to have the amount subscribed by him 
refunded by the town. At the same meeting the sum of twenty 
thousand dollars was appropriated for war purposes. 

1865. At the annual meeting held March 6th, the town 
appropriated five thousand nine hundred and thirteen dollars 
and twenty-two cents to cover the deficiency existing in recruit- 
ing expenses and paying bounties, and a vote of thanks was 
unanimously passed to the selectmen for their valuable services 
during the war. 

Newton furnished one thousand and sixty-seven men for the 
war, which was a surplus of sixty-four over and above all 
demands. Thirty-six were commissioned oflicers. The total 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town for 
war purposes, exclusive of State aid, was one hundred and five 
thousand seven hundred and twenty dollars and forty-three 
cents ($105,720.43). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $1,490.23 ; in 1802, 
$7,479.09; in 1863, $10,637.38; in 1864, $10,000.00; in 
1865, $8,000.00. Total amount, $37,606.70. 

Newton has erected a very handsome monument, in honor of 
its gallant men who fell in the war, the cost of which was 
upwards of five thousand dollars, of which some twelve hundred 
dollars were raised by general subscription of the adult popu- 
lation of the town. The amount which each subscribed was 
limited to one dollar. Eleven hundred of the school children 
paid into the general fund each one dime. 



NORTH READING. 439 

North Reading. — Incorporated March 22, 1853. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 1,203 ; in 1865, 991. Valuation in 1860, $527,- 
890; in 1865, $577,389. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Joel A. Abbott, James L. Eaton, 
Charles P. Howard ; in 1862, Charles P. Howard, Joel A. 
Abbott, Isaac Flint; in 1863, Daniel G.Abbott, Benjamin 
Eames, Albert H. Holt ; in 1864, Daniel G. Abbott, John B. 
Campbell, Albert H. Holt ; in 1865, Daniel G. Abbott, Albert 
H. Holt, Isaac Flint. 

The town-clerk from 1853, and all through the war, was 
Charles P. Howard. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 
1863 was Alanson A. Upton ; in 1864 and 1865, Benjamin 
Eames. 

1861. The first town-meeting to act upon matters relating 
to the war was held May 4th, at which it was voted to appro- 
priate one thousand dollars for the relief of the families of 
soldiers who had already enlisted, and of those who might after- 
wards enter the military service, and five hundred dollars for 
the soldiers themselves. September 27th, The town-treasurer 
was authorized to borrow " such suras of money under instruc- 
tions from the selectmen as shall be wanted from time to 
time." 

1862. April 25th, Voted, to appropriate a sum of money 
not to exceed twelve hundred dollars for the support of the 
families of volunteers living in the town, two hundred dollars 
for the sick and wounded soldiers, and for the transportation 
and burial of the bodies of those who had already fallen in 
battle. July 25th, The selectmen were instructed to enlist 
twenty-one men to fill the quota of the town under the pending 
call of the President, and to pay each volunteer a bounty of 
one hundred dollars ; also, to pay the same bounty to each vol- 
unteer who had already enlisted, " and who actually belonged to 
North Reading." August 14th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one 
hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer " to fill the next 
quota." A sum not exceeding forty-five hundred dollars was 
appropriated for that purpose ; also one thousand dollars for aid 
to the families of volunteers. 

1863. November 16th, Voted, to appropriate five hundred 



440 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

dollars " for the benefit of discharged, invalid, and disabled 
soldiers and their families." 

1864. March 26th, Voted, to raise sixteen hundred dollars 
to pay bounties to volunteers enlisting to the credit of the town. 
June 10th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-five 
hundred dollars " for the purpose of raising volunteers for future 
calls of the President of the United States." August 22d, 
Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
" for each man for the present call." 

1865. Two meetings were held January 14th and March 
6th, at which it was voted to continue recruiting, and to pay to 
each volunteer a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

North Heading furnished one hundred and thirty-one men for 
the war, which was a surplus of seven over and above all demands. 
One was a commissioned officer. The total amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town for war purposes, ex- 
clusive of State aid, was twenty-five thousand three hundred 
and fifteen dollars ($25,315.00.) 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $335.40; 
in 1862, $1,800.79 ; in 1863, $2,635.30 ; in 1864, $4,056.88 ; 
in 1865, $3,000.00. Total amount, $11,828.37. 

Pepperell. — Incorporated April 6, 1753. Population in 
1860, 1,895 ; in 1865, 1,709. Valuation in 1860, $754,506 ; 
in 1865, $924,405. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Sumner Carter, William A. 
Ames, Henry H. Blood; in 1862 and 1863, John Loring, 
Albert Lcighton, Henry D. Shattuck ; in 1864, Sumner Carter, 
Henry D. Shattuck, Jacob Miller; in 1865, Sumner Carter, 
Henry D. Shattuck, Putnam Shattuck. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863 was Charles Crosby; 
in 1864, Levi Wallace; in 1865, David W. Jewett. The 
town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, and 1863 was Charles Crosby; 
in 1864 and 1865, Levi Wallace. 

1861. On the 22d of April a citizens' meeting was held in 
Central Hall, at which several patriotic speeches were made, and 



PEPPERELL. 441 

a series of resolutions adopted. A legal town-meeting was 
held on the 30th of April, when Deacon Charles Crosby, from 
the citizens' meeting of April 22d, presented a preamble and 
resolutions, which were discussed at length and unanimously 
adopted. One of the resolutions was as follows : — 

Resolved^ That as citizens of the United States we assert our 
unwaveriug attachment to our National Union, made sacred by the 
blood of our fathers, who marched through the sanguinary struggle of 
the Revolution, which was perfected by the adoption of the Constitu- 
tion. 

The other resolutions assert that any attempt to subvert the 
Constitution and divide the Union must be put down ; that it 
was the duty of the President to uphold the Union and enforce 
the laws ; that in his call for troops he was right, and would 
receive the support of the people; that "this was no time for 
any man to stand neutral, nor shrink from responsibility, but 
to rally around and support the constitutional authorities ; that 
it was our duty to bid God-speed to our fellow citizens who had 
engaged or should engage in the war, and to take good care of 
their families when they were absent." Two thousand dollars 
were appropriated to pay each volunteer from the town ten 
dollars upon enlistment, and ten dollars a month while in the 
military service of the country, provided the whole amount shall 
not exceed two thousand dollars. A vigilance committee often 
was chosen '' for the suppression of disloyalty in the community." 
October 7th, Voted, to give all needful aid to the families of 
soldiers. 

18(52. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three 
years, and is mustered in to the credit of the town. A com- 
mittee was appointed to co-operate with the ladies of Pepperell, 
in obtaining recruits. August 26th, The selectmen were author- 
ized to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for 
nine months' service. December 16th, It was voted to enlist 
no more nine-months men, but to pay a bounty of one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for three years' service, 
and to pay the same to each drafted man if there should be any. 

1864. June 29th, The selectmen were given discretionary 



442 HASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

power to recruit men, and to pay such bounties as they might 
deem necessary in order to fill the quota of the town ; and this 
was continued until the end of the war. * 

Pepperell furnished one hundred and eighty-six men for the 
war, which was a surplus of thirteen over and above all demands. 
Five were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was sixteen thousand two hundred and 
eighty-two dollars and seventy-five cents ($16,282.75). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $353.54; in 1862, 
$2,429.42; in 1863, $2,943.15 ; in 1864, $2,700.00 ; in 1865, 
$1,450.00. Total amount, $9,876.11. 

The ladies of Pepperell were constant in their endeavors to 
do good for the soldiers at the front, and forwarded during the 
war to the Sanitary and Christian Commissions articles valued 
at thirty-two hundred and fifty dollars. The Rev. Charles 
Babbidge went out with the Sixth Regiment of three-months 
men in April 1861, as chaplain, and with the Twenty-Sixth 
three-years regiment. With the exception of two months he 
was on duty from the beginning to the end of the war. Rev. 
Edward P. Smith, of Pepperell, w^as a valued and active mem- 
ber of the Christian Commission. 

Reading. — Incorporated May 29, 1644. Population in 
1860, 2,602 ; in 1865, 2,436. Valuation in 1860, $1,269,570 ; 
in 1865, $1,293,056. 

The selectmen in 1861 were James S. Campbell, J. Brooks 
Leathe, Milo Parker ; in 1862, James S. Campbell, J. Brooks 
Leathe, Solon A. Parker; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, James S. 
Campbell, Joseph L. Pratt, Solon A. Parker. 

The town-clerk in 1861, and part of 1862, was Jonathan 
Baldwin ; in part of 1862 and in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Wil- 
iam J. Wightman. The town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was Georfje Batchelder. 

1861. Under the first call of the President, April 15, for 
seventy-five thousand men, twenty-one men of Reading enlisted, 



READING. 443 

and on the 19th started for Washington. They were in the first 
battle of Bull Run. April 30th, Provision was made for aid to 
the families of volunteers. June 4th, Five thousand dollars 
were appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families as provided 
by law ; also voted to pay each inhabitant " who enlists for the 
war twenty-five dollars for an outfit." 

1862. March 3d, Three thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated for aid to soldiers' families. July 17th, Voted, to pay 
each volunteer who enlists for three years and is credited to the 
quota of the town a bounty of one hundred dollars. August 
26th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars 
to each volunteer for nine months' service. September 15th, 
This bounty was directed to be paid to each man, not exceeding 
fifty-five, " who shall enlist in the Reading Company," Company 
D, Fiftieth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, then in camp 
at Boxford. 

1863. Abiel Holden, Esq., bequeathed five hundred dollars 
for the erection of a monument to the memory of Reading men 
who had died or might die in the military or naval service of 
the country during the war, on condition that the town appro- 
priated the same amount for that purpose. 

The town on the 6th of March, 1865, appropriated one thou- 
sand dollars to be added to the bequest of Mr. Holden. The 
monument was erected and dedicated with appropriate solemni- 
ties, October 5th, of the same year. This is believed to have 
been the first monument erected in the State in memory of the 
men who fell in the Rebellion. On it are inscribed the 
names of forty-six Reading men, who died in the cause of their 
country. 

Reading furnished four hundred and eleven men for the 
war, which was a surplus of thirty-four over and above all 
demands. Thirteen were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty-seven 
thousand nine hundred and seventy-one dollars and eleven cents 
($37,971.11). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid 



J 



444 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,251.31; 
in 1802, $5,921.47 ; in 1863, $7,472.18 ; in 1864, $6,143,88 ; 
in 1865, $4,100.00. Total amount, $25,888.84. 

The ladies of Reading met two or three times a week during 
the war to prepare lint, bandages, and clothing for the soldiers, 
and forwarded them to the army and to the Sanitary Commis- 
sion. They kept no record of their good works ; one of them, 
Miss Emily Ruggles, furnished a representative recruit "for 
three years' service." 

Sherborn. — Incorporated May 27, 1674. Population in 
I860, 1,129 ; in 1865, 1,049. Valuation in 1860, $873,154; 
in 1865, $869,539. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Nathaniel Dowse, George B. 
Hooker, Cluirles Hill ; in 1862, Nathaniel Dowse, Jeremiah 
R. Hawes, Leonard T. Morse; in 1863, and 1864, Nathaniel 
Dowse, Leonard T. Morse, James H. Leland ; in 1865, James 
H. Leland, Leonard T. Morse, Lowell Coolidge. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all these years was 
Joseph Dowse, Jr. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon war mat- 
ters was held on the 1st of May, at which Elbridge Sanger, 
Rev. T. II. Dorr, and W. Chamberlain, "were chosen a com- 
mittee to prepare and report resolutions as a basis of action." 
They reported the following which was preceded by a patriotic 
preamble : — 

Resolved, That the people of this town place the most perfect reli- 
auce and trust in the present form of our Government ; that we believe 
it to have been founded in wisdom and patriotism, and that we will 
throw aside all party feelings, and with a firm reliance on the blessing 
of God, pledge our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor, to up- 
hold and perpetuate the Government and institutions of the United 
States. 

The committee also recommended the appropriation of two 
thousand dollars to furnish clothing to the volunteers who 
should enlist from that town, and for aid to their families ; also 
to make the monthly pay of each volunteer seventeen dollars, 
including the Government pay. May 15th, Voted, that drafted 



SHERBORN. 445 

men have the same pay as volunteers. Three hundred and 
fifty dollars were appropriated to purchase guns and equipments 
for a drill company. November 5th, Five hundred dollars 
were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families, and " the use of 
the town hall with lights was given to the military free of 
expense." 

18G2. July 22d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each of the fourteen men required to 
fill the quota of the town, who should enlist and be credited to 
Sherborn.* A committee was chosen to solicit subscriptions 
**for fitting out soldiers." Three hundred and fifty dollars were 
collected. Several meetings were held about this time, at which 
war speeches were made by distinguished citizens from other 
places. August 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and fifty dollars to each nine-months volunteer enlisting to the 
credit of the town. 

1863. March 2d, Three thousand dollars were appropri- 
ated for State aid to soldiers' families. June 1st, The select- 
men were authorized to appropriate such further sum as may be 
necessarv for the comfort of soldiers' families. 

18G4. August 4th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who enlists for 
three years, and is credited to the town before the 1st of March, 
1865. 

1865. June 19th, Voted, to repay to citizens the money 
they had given to encourage recruiting ; also one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars to each citizen who had paid commutation 
money, or had procured a substitute. 

Sherborn furnished one hundred and eight men for the war, 
which was a surplus of sixteen over and above all demands. 
Three were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty thousand five 
hundred and ten dollars ($20,510.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 



* August 6th, The bounty was increased to one hundred and seventj-five dol- 
lars to eacli three-years volunteer. 



I 



446 MASSACHUSETTS IK THE REBELLION. 

during the war for State aid to soldiers* families, and repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In I86I9 $118.34; 
in 1862, $1,021.24; in 1863, $1,515.70 ; in 1864, $1,336.94; 
in 1865, $800.00. Total amount, $4,792.22. 

The ladies of Sherborn were very active in their labors for 
the comfort of the soldiers. 

Shirley. — Incorporated Jan. 5, 1753. Population in 1860, 
1,468; in 1865, 1,217. Valuation in 1860, $662,067; in 
1865, $676,275. 

The selectmen in 1861 were James P. Longley, Samuel 
Famsworth, Charles A. Edgarton ; in 1862, 1863, and 1864, 
Stillman D. Benjamin, Nathaniel Hartwell, Alfred Page ; in 
1865, David Porter, George Davis, Edwin L. White. 

The town-clerk during all these years was Zenas Brown, 
The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Thomas 
Whitney; in 1865, James P. Longley. 

1861. A town-meeting was held April 30th, at which J. K, 
Going introduced resolutions, which were adopted, to the follow- 
ing effect : 1st. To pay all volunteers, citizens of the town who 
have enlisted or may enlist, twelve dollars a month, the same to 
be paid to their families at the discretion of the town, and if any 
should fall in battle the money to be paid to the families during 
the term for which the men enlisted ; single men were to have 
the same paid to them or their legal representatives at the end 
of their terms of service ; they were also to be furnished with 
proper outfits. 2d. Voted, to raise five hundred dollars by 
taxation for these purposes. 3d. James P. Longley, Samuel 
Famsworth, and Charles A. Edgarton were chosen a committee 
to distribute the money. 

1862. April 28th, Voted, to raise a thousand dollars for aid 
to the families of volunteers. June 19th, Voted, to borrow 
five hundred dollars for the same purpose. July 23d, Voted, 
to borrow sixteen hundred dollars to pay a bounty of one 
hundred dollars to each volunteer from that town, and to pay 
N. C. Munson for money already advanced by him. August 
23d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow whatever sums of 
money were required to pay bounties to volunteers to fill the 
quota of the town. 



SOMERYILLE. 447 

1863. July 27th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to drafted men or their substitutes, if mustered in to the 
credit of the town ; also, to pay aid to their families. 

1864. April 25th, Voted, to repay to citizens of the town 
the amounts they had severally subscribed and paid for recruit- 
ing purposes. May — , Voted, to raise one thousand dollars for 
recruiting purposes, and to pay to certain recruits who had been 
credited to the town the sum of one hundred dollars each. 
July 5th, The town voted to raise two thousand dollars, and to 
pay volunteers a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 
August 27th, Voted, to pay a bounty to each volunteer enlisting 
to the credit of the town one hundred and twenty-five dollars in 
gold ; the selectmen to raise the money in such manner as they 
should think best. November 8th, Voted, to borrow two thou- 
sand dollars to pay bounties to volunteers. 

1865. January 24th, The selectmen were authorized to 
recruit fifteen more men, and to borrow money sufficient to pay 
each a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and to 
make up to those who had previously enlisted the same amount. 
March 6th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow a sum not 
exceeding three thousand dollars to fill the quota of the town in 
anticipation of another call for men. May 20th, Voted, to raise 
two thousand dollars to repay individuals the amounts they had 
voluntarily advanced for procuring volunteers. 

Shirley furnished one hundred and forty-two men for the war, 
which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. 
Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
raised and expended by the town for war purposes, exclusive of 
State aid, was thirteen thousand seven hundred and fourteen 
dollars and twenty-three cents ($13,714.23). 

The amount of money raised and appropriated by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $211.96; in 
1862, $1,308.97; in 1863, $1,588.86 ; in 1864, $1,407.15 ; 
in 1865, $1,000.00, Total amount, $5,516.94. 

SoMERViLLE. Incorporated March 3, 1843. Population 
in 1860, 8,025 ; in 1865, 9,366. Valuation in 1860, $6,033,- 
053 ; in 1865, $5,683,244, 



448 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Henry A. Snow, 
Benjiiinin Randall, Albert Kenneson, Charles H. Guild, Thomas 
Cunningham ; in 1863, Henry A. Snow, Thomas Cunningham, 
Levi Tirason, John R. Poor, S. C. Whiteher; in 1864 and 
1865, John R. Poor, Levi Timson, Francis Houghton, Nelson 
Howe, George W. Hadley. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Charles 
E. Giluian. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Clark Bennett; 
in 1862, Robert A. Vinal ; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Thomas 
Cunnhigham.* 

1861. The Somerville Light-Infantry Company having been 
ordered to Washington with the Fifth Regiment, to which it 
belonged, a large meeting of citizens was held on the 17th of 
April. Several speeches were made ; a subscription paper was 
opened, and in a very short time $4,308.50 were subscribed and 
paid in for the benefit of the members and their families. Seven 
hundred dollars were given Captain George O. Brastow for the 
immediate use of the company, and smaller sums to each member. 
The remainder of the money was placed in the savings' bank, sub- 
ject to the order of the selectmen of the town.f April 29th, A 
legal town-meeting was held, at which suitable provision was 
made for the soldiers' families. Five thousand dollars were 
appropriated for that purpose. 

1862. April 28th, Six thousand five hundred dollars were 
appropriated for State aid to soldiers' families. July 19th, 
Ninety-two men for three years' service having been called for 
as the quota of the town, it was voted to pay a bounty to each 
volunteer to the number of one hundred, so as to make a full 
company ; the bounty to be paid when the men were mustered 
in and credited to the town. A rallying committee of sixty was 
appointed to procure enlistments. August 27th, Voted, to pay 
a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volun- 



* This gentleman was recruiting officer of the town during most of the war. 

t After its return from three months' service the unexpended balance of this 
fund (about §2,000) was appropriated by a vote of the Company to the erection 
of a handsome marble monument, on whicli is recorded the names of sixty-eight 
Somerville men who fell in battle or died of disease or wounds while in the service 
of their country. 



80MERYILLE. 449 

teer for nine months' service. September 24th, An additional 
sum of seventy-five dollars was directed to be paid to each mem- 
ber of the Somerville Light Infantry " who may enlist in the 
nine-months service." The selectmen were given discretionary 
power to arrange for the support and comfort of the sick and 
wounded soldiers belonging to Somerville. December 17th, 
Ten thousand dollars were appropriated for payment of State 
aid. 

1863. April 27th, An additional ten thousand dollars was 
appropriated for the same purpose. November 3d, The follow- 
ing resolution was passed : — 

Resolved^ Unanimously, that the people of this town will sustain the 
Federal Government in its efforts to break jown the present rebellion 
in the Southern Slates ; that for this purpose they will do their utmost 
to furnish their full quota of troops without conscription, and that they 
will, at any legal meeting hereafler assembled, ratify and provide 
money for any necessary expenditure which the selectmen may incur 
in furtherance of this object 

1864. March 28th, Twelve thousand five hundred dollars 
were appropriated for the payment of bounties to volunteers. 
A committee of twenty was appointed to aid the selectmen in 
the enlistment of volunteers. April 28th, Five hundred dollars 
were appropriated for the purchase of wood and coal for soldiers' 
families, and twelve thousand dollars for State aid. Several 
other meetings were held by the town, at which money was 
appropriated for recruiting purposes and for State aid to the 
families of volunteers. 

Somerville furnished eleven hundred and thirty-five men for 

the war, which was a surplus of one hundred and forty-seven 

over and above all demands. Forty were commissioned oflScers. 

The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by 

the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was 

one hundred and thirty-three thousand and thirty-nine dollars 

and forty-one cents ($133,039.41). In addition to this amount 

sixty-five thousand eight hundred and twenty-three dollars and 

thirty-eight cents ($65,823.38) were voluntarily contributed for 

recruiting purposes by citizens of Somerville. 

The amount of money raised and expended during the war 

2U 




450 ]fA88AGHU8ETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

for State aid to soldiers* families, and repaid by the Common- 
wealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,381.72; in 1862, $12,- 
993.24; in 1863, $17,417.58 ; in 1864, $15,200.00 ; in 1865, 
$8,000.00. Total amount, $55,992.54. 

The ladies of Somerville were forward in every good word 
and work for the soldiers, beginning at the commencement of 
the war and continuing until the end. They held meetings 
every week ; each religious society had its Soldiers- Aid Society. 
They made under-clothes, scraped lint, sewed bandages, knit 
socks, roasted turkeys, baked pies, made jellies, and were un- 
ceasing in their patriotic and Christian work for the sick and 
wounded, and for the " boys in the cause." The money value of 
their contributions amounted to several thousand dollars. Even 
the unfortunate inmates of the McLean Insane Asylum, under tlie 
direction of Mrs. Tyler, wife of Doctor Tyler, furnished articles 
sufficient to fill four large boxes, which were forwarded to the 
front. 

South Reading.* — Incorporated Feb, 25, 1812. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 3,207 ; in 1865, 3,245. Valuation in 1860, 
$1,861,319; in 1865, $1,778,786. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Edward Mansfield, Thomas 
Green, John Purington ; in 1862, D. B. Wheelock, Henry 
Oliver, Thomas B. Walker; in 1863, D. B. Wheelock, J. 
Sullivan Eaton, Horatio DoUiver; in 1864, D. B. Wheelock, 
Horatio Dolliver, Thomas B. Walker; in 1865, D. B. Whee- 
lock, Edward Mansfield, Thomas B. Walker. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was Charles H. Shepard; in 1862, 
1863, and 1864, Jacob C. Hartshorn ; in 1865, Chester W. 
Eaton. The town-treasurer during all these years was James 
F. Emerson. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to consider matters re- 
lating to the war was held April 29th, at which it was voted to 
pay each soldier belonging to the town, while in active service, 
twenty dollars a month, **and to take care of the families of 
such as fall." May 1st, A military committee was appointed 
"^to pay all necessary aid to the families of volunteers." 

* Name changed to Wakefield, June 80, 1868. 



SOUTH READING. 451 

1862. April 21st, Voted, that the military committee ap- 
pointed in 1861 be discontinued. July 14th, The selectmen 
were given discretionary power to pay State aid to the families 
of volunteers. August 4th, The town assumed the payment of 
thirty-two hundred dollars, ** which had been subscribed by indi- 
viduals." George O. Carpenter, E. Mansfield, and S. Folger 
were appointed a recruiting committee. August 25th, Voted, 
to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who 
shall enlist for nine months in the South Reading ** Richardson 
Light Guard." September 8th, Vote<l, to pay the same bounty 
to each citizen of the town, " now serving in the Federal armies ; 
and if he falls or dies the bounty shall be paid to his widow or 
legal representatives, provided he has not already received a 
bounty." December 22d, The recruiting committee was author- 
ized to pay such boOnties as they should deem proper to volun- 
teers to fill the quota of the town. 

1863. April 6th, Voted, to raise five hundred dollars for 
military purposes. June 1st, Voted, to pay a bounty of one 
hundred dollars to each volunteer belonging to the town in the 
three-years service, when honorably discharged ; and if he should 
die in the service the same to be paid to his widow or heirs. 

1864. April 4th, The selectmen were authorized to pay to 
the families of volunteers such aid as they might require for 
their comfortable support, " without regard to what the State 
will refund." Several other meetings were held during the 
year to adopt measures to obtain recruits, pay bounties, and 
give aid to the soldiers' families, " without regard to what the 
State will refund." 

South Reading furnished three hundred and eighty-six men 
for the war, which was a surplus of thirty-three over and above 
all demands. Twenty-eight were commissioned oflScers. The 
whole amount of money appropriated and expended for war 
purposes, exclusive of State aid, was forty-nine thousand four 
hundred and fifty-six dollars and forty-nine cents ($49,456.49)^ 

The amount of money raised and expended during the war 
for State aid to soldiers' families, and which was repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $3,459.98 ; in 1862, 
$9,036.79; in 1863, $8,858.48 ; in 1864, $9,500.00; in 1865, 
$6,000.00. Total amount, $36,855.25. 



;■ I 



i 



452 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Stoneham. — Incorporated Dec. 17, 1725. Population in 
1860, 3,206; in 1865, $3,299. Valuation in 1860, $1,207,- 
701 ; in 1865, $1,333,637. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Jesse Carter, Franklin Harri- 
man, A. K. Green; in 1862, B. F. Richardson, Jesse Carter, 
H. H. French ; in 1863, John Hill, Onslow Gilmore, ; 

in 1864, John Hill, L. F. Lynde, M. L. Morse, E. T. >VTiit- 
tier; in 1865, John Hill, M. L. Morse, L. F. Lynde, Keuben 
Richardson, E. T. Whittier, A. R. Green. 

The town-clerk through all these years was Silas Dean. The 
town-treasurer from 1859 to 1871 was Sumner Richardson, 2d. 

1861. Tlie first legal town-meeting to act upon matters con- 
nected with the war was held on the 2d of May, at which it was 
voted to allow the new military company the use of the town 
hall, free of any charge,* and the selectmen were directed to 
take good care of the soldiers' families. Each member of the 
company was voted twenty dollars a month until the fourth of 
July, " unless sooner called into active service ; the members 
to be paid weekly. June 3d, The selectmen were requested to 
visit the soldiers' families " once in two weeks, in order to ascer- 
tain the supplies necessary for their comfort." 

1862. July 17th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to "each of the thirty-seven 
volunteers " called for to complete the quota of the town under 
the recent call of the President for more men. At this meeting 
a preamble and resolutions were read and adopted by a unani- 
mous vote. We quote three of the resolutions : — 

Resolved^ That we heartily endorse this call from our President, 
and will stand by the Government, cost what it may of blood or treas- 
ure, until this llebellion is crushed, and the authority of the Constitu- 
tion in the revolted States is once more restored. 

Resolved, That in the promptness with which in our midst this call 
has been answered, we see again the spirit of our Fathers ; for as on 
April 19th, 1775, Stoneham blood was spilled on Lexington Green, so 

* Stoneham had a company in the Sixth Regiment which left the State April 
17th, and was attacked by the mob in Baltimore, April 19th, and the captain 
and first lieutenant were wounded. A full description of which is given in 
volume 1. pp. 92 to 98 inclusive. 



8T0NEHAM. 453 

on April 19th, 1861, the streets of Baltimore were baptized with the 
blood of her sons ; and though their lives have been offered up on their 
country's altar in almost every battle fought for national existence, yet 
they stand ready for further sacrifice, and willingly leave home and 
friends to battle for Freedom and Right. 

Resolved^ That we, the citizens of Stoneham, tender to those who 
have enrolled their names among the heroic defenders of their country's 
cause our sincere thanks for their prompt response at this time ; and 
we whom age, infirmity, or other impediments render unable to go, 
pledge ourselves that nothing shall be wanting on our part to render 
themselves and families any aid their condition may require. 

August 26th, Voted, to pay one hundred dollars bounty to 
each of the forty men enlisted in the new company for nine 
months' service, to be paid when mustered in ; and the selectmen 
were authorized to borrow the money for that purpose. Decem- 
ber 13th, Ira Gerry, Amos Hill, 2d, L. F. Lynde, George Cow- 
drey, and John Hill, were chosen to enlist volunteers necessary 
to fill the quota of the town, and to pay such bounties ''as in 
their judgment may be for the best interest of the town ;" the 
town-treasurer was authorized to borrow the money. December 
19th, The above committee reported that no further recruiting 
would be necessary at present, as they had ascertained at head- 
quarters that Stoneham had already furnished sixty-two men 
more than its proportion. 

1863. November 3d, Voted, to petition the Governor to call 
an extra session of the Legislature ; John Hill, John Kingman, 
Levi S. Rowe, George W. Dike, and L. F. Lynde were 
appointed ^ to pursue such a course as they think for the best, 
to carry the foregoing vote into effect. 

1864. April 25th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist to fill 
the quota of the town from the first day of March, 1864, for 
one year, and to raise three thousand dollars for that purpose. 
November 8th, Voted, to set apart certain lots in Lindewood 
Cemetery, in Stoneham, for the burial of soldiers belonging to 
the town, and Amasa Farrier was appointed chairman of a 
committee to carry the vote into effect. 

1865. March 6th, The selectmen were instructed to con- 
tinue recruiting agreeable to State laws. 



454 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Stoneham furnished four hundred and four men for the war, 
which was a surplus of forty-six over and above all demands. 
Twenty-five were commissioned oflScers. The whole amount of 
money raised and expended by the town for war purposes, 
exclusive of State aid, was thirty thousand six hundred and 
forty-six dollars and seventy-nine cents ($30,646.79). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $2,956.91; in 
1862, $7,314.82; in 1863, $6,800.00; in 1864, $10,800.00; 
in 1865, $8,600. Total amount, $36,111.73. 

Stow. — Incorporated May 16, 1683. Population in 1860, 
1,641; in 1865, 1,537. Valuation in 1860, $713,320; in 
1865, $764,274. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were H. W. Nelson, F. 
W. Warren, A. Rice ; in 1863, William H. Brown, Truman 
Walcott, Jonathan P. Bent; in 1864 and 1865, F. W. War- 
ren, Augustus Rice, Abram Priest. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1864, and 1865 was H. W. 
Nelson ; in 1863, William H. Brown. The town-treasurer 
in 1861 was Thomas H. Bent ; in 1862 and 1863, William H. 
Brown ; in 1864, R. W. Derby ; in 1865, Peter Fletcher. 

1861. A legal town-meeting was held April 27th, at which 
it was voted to appropriate one thousand dollars to uniform and 
equip citizens of Stow who volunteer in the military service, 
and to support their families while absent on duty. Twenty- 
eight young men immediately volunteered. Cloth was pur- 
chased, and the ladies from day to day met at the town hall 
and made nearly one hundred garments. 

1862. July 23d, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years and be 
credited to the town. At another meeting, held in August, the 
same amount of bounty was allowed to each volunteer for nine 
months' service. 

The town continued to pay bounties and to recruit men for 
the service until the end of the war. 

Stow furnished one hundred and seventy-four men for the 



8UDBUBY. 455 

war, which was a surplus of twenty-two over and above 
all demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifteen thou- 
sand nine hundred and ninety one dollars and seventy cents 
($15,991.70). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $550.35; 
in 1862, $1,624.70 ; in 1863, $1,925.00 ; in 1864, $2,460.30 ; 
in 1865, $1,983.09. Total amount, $8,643.47. 

As an example of the patriotic spirit of the ladies during 
the war, we relate the following incident : At one time they 
appointed a committee of their own sex to solicit subscriptions 
for a " Fair " to raise a fund for the soldiers. They called upon 
a miller, about a mile from the town hall, who told the com- 
mittee he would give them a bag of meal if they would wheel 
it in a wheelbarrow to the hall. They acceded to the terms, 
and wheeled the meal to the hall, where it was sold and brought 
a good price. A wheelwright gave them the wheelbarrow, 
which was afterwards put up at auction, and brought more 
than fifty dollars. It was sold several times, each purchaser 
after paying what he had bid would cry out, " put it up again." 
The fair netted over eight hundred dollars. 

Sudbury. — Incorporated Sept. 4, 1639. Population in 
1860, 1,691; in 1865, 1,703. Valuation in 1860, $1,043,- 
091; in 1865, $1,052,778. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were James Moore, John 
H. Dakin, George Parmenter; in 1863, A. B. Jones, George 
Goodnow, H. H. Goodnough ; in 1864 and 1865, Thomas P. 
Hurlbut, Charles Hunt, Walter Rogers. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was J. S. 
Hunt. The town-treasurer during the years 1861, 1862, and 
1863 was Edwin Harrington; in 1864 and 1865, S. A. 
Jones. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters re- 
lating to the war was held on the 29th of April, and it being 



456 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

• 

expected that the ** Wadsworth Rifle Guards,'*— the same being 
Company B, of the Second Battalion Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia, — belonging to Sudbury, would be called into active 
service, it was voted to furnish a new uniform and a revolver to 
each private and non-commissioned officer, and a sword to each 
of the commissioned officers ; also to pay each member while 
in active service an amount which, added to Government pay, 
would make twenty dollars a month ; also, ^ that the families 
of those who may leave shall be furnished with all necessary 
assistance at the expense of the town, and their business shall 
be cared for by the town, and not allowed to suffer by their 
absence." * 

1862. July 28th, Voted, to pay each volunteer who shall 
enlist in the military service for three years, and be credited to 
the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and twenty- 
five dollars. The number required was fourteen, and the 
selectmen were instructed to enlist the men, and to provide at 
the expense of the town for any sick or wounded volunteer 
belonging to Sudbury. August 19th, The bounty to volun- 
teers for nine months' service was fixed at one hundred dollars. 

1863. December 7th, The selectmen were authorized **to 
use all legal and proper means to fill the town's quota, in com- 
pliance with the call of the President, dated Oct. 17, 1863, 
for three hundred thousand men." 

1864. June 4th, Voted, to raise a sufficient amount of 
money to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
to each volunteer who shall enlist and be credited to the quota 
of Sudbury, in anticipation of any subsequent call of the Presi- 
dent for more men. This amount of bounty was continued to 
be paid until the close of the war. 

Sudbury furnished one hundred and sixty-eight men for the 
war, which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. 
Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 

* This Company on the 29th of June, 1861, was sent to Fort Independence, 
Boston Harbor, for guard duty ; but was afterwards disbanded, and a part of the 
members enlisted in the Thirteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers for 
three years' service. 



TEWK8BURT. 457 

exclusive of State aid, was seventeen thousand five hundred and 
seventy-five dollars ($17,575.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $269.50; in 
1862, $1,356.55; in 1863, $1,611.09; in 1864, $1,770.68; 
in 1865, $1,191.36. Total amount, $6,199.18. 

Tewksbury. — Incorporated December 23, 1734. Popu- 
lation in 1860, 1,744; in 1865, 1,801. Valuation in 1860, 
$620,886; in 1865, $746,624. 

The selectmen in 1861, 1862, and 1863 were Leonard 
Huntress, Aaron Frost, Alvin Marshall; in 1864, Leonard 
Huntress, Aaron Frost, George Pillsbury ; in 1865, Leonard 
Huntress, Aaron Frost, Jesse L. Trull. 

The town-clerk during these years was Enoch Foster. The 
town-treasurer in 1861 was Henry E. Preston ; in 1862, 1863, 
1864, and 1865, Oren Frost. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to consider matters 
relating to the war was held on the 6th of May, at which it 
was voted to appropriate two thousand dollars to provide an 
outfit, and a reasonable amount of pocket-money for each of 
the volunteers belonging to the town ; to provide for the com- 
fort of their families while absent, and to make the pay of each 
enlisted man twenty dollars a month while in service. A com- 
mittee consisting of the selectmen and four other citizens were 
given discretionary power in the expenditure of the money. 

1862. July 28th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist in 
the military service for three years to the number of eleven, to 
be paid when mustered in. August 25th, The selectmen were 
authorized to pay to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of 
the town for nine months' service a bounty of one hundred 
dollars. 

1863. November 3d, Voted, to pay a bounty of two hun- 
dred dollars to each volunteer enlisting for three years and 
credited to the town. A committee of citizens was chosen to 
make *^an assessment on each individual of his proportion, 



458 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

necessary to be raised for the purpose. The selectmen were 
requested to call public meetings to encourage recruiting, as 
they might judge proper. 

1864. May 30th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred and twenty -five dollars during the year 
to each volunteer for three years' service when mustered in and 
credited to the quota of the town. Many public meetings were 
held in the town during the Rebellion, at which patriotic reso- 
lutions were passed and speeches made in favor of a vigorous 
prosecution of the war. The two clergymen, Rev. Richard 
Tolman, and Rev. Clifton Fletcher, were indefatigable in their 
efforts in behalf of the good cause. 

Tewksbury furnished one hundred and eighty men for the 
war, which was a surplus of eleven over and above all demands. 
Three were commissioned officers. The whole amount of 
money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirteen thousand three hun- 
dred and eighty-seven dollars ($13,387.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $114.39; 
in 1862, $1,217.69 ; in 1863, $1,532.02 ; in 1864, $1,626.08 ; 
in 1865, $900.00. Total amount, $5,490.18. 

" The ladies of Tewksbury from the beginning to the end of 
the struggle were unceasing in their labors in behalf of the sol- 
diers and their families." 

TowNSEND. — Incorporated June 29, 1732. Population in 
1860, 2,005; in 1865, 2,056. Valuation in 1860, $663,222; 
in 1865, $737,352. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were N. F. Cumings, 
Alexander Craig, B. F. Lewis; in 1863, N. F. Cumings, Oli- 
ver H. Pratt, Charles H. Warren; in 1864, N. F. Cumings, 
J. N. Tucker, N. C. Boutell ; in 1865, Oliver Proctor, StUI- 
man Haynes, Abel G. Stearns. 

The town-clerk in 1861 was Ezra Blood; in 1862, Noah 
Wallace; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Daniel Adams. The 
town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was F. C. Burt; in 1863, 



TOWN8END. 459 

Joseph Adams; in 1864, A. M. Adams; in 1865, Edward 
Ordway. 

1861. At a town-meeting held April 11th, a committee of 
five was appointed to consider and report what action should 
be taken by the town in regard to the Rebellion. This com- 
mittee made the following report, which was unanimously 
adopted : — 

Whereas a portion of the States of this Union is now in open re- 
bellion against the Government, and- the President of the United 
States has called upon the loyal States for a military force to suppress 
it and maintain the laws of the land : Now, therefore, we the citizens 
of Townsend in town-meeting assembled declare our undying love for 
Liberty and the Union, and our sacred regard for the Constitution as 
transmitted to us by its founders. 

Resolved^ That we tender to the Government our sympathy, and if 
necessary, our lives and property. 

Walter Fessenden, Daniel L. Brown, N. F. Cumings, J. 
N. Tucker, and A. M. Adams were chosen a committee to 
form a military company, and tender their services to the Gov- 
ernment, and to provide for the families of the soldiers while in 
actual service. 

1862. July 19th, Voted, unanimously, to pay a bounty of one 
hundred dollars to each volunteer for three years' service, to the 
number of twenty-one, to fill the quota of the town. August 
26th, The same bounty was directed to be paid to recruits for 
nine months' service. October 23d, Voted, to pay one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars "to each of the surplus volunteers of 
Townsend, now enlisted into the service of the United States." 

1863. No vote appears to have been passed by the town in 
regard to the war during this year. 

1864. August 18th, Voted, to raise six thousand two hun- 
dred and fifty dollars in gold, to be applied by the selectmen in 
such manner as they shall deem best to procure volunteers to 
fill the quota of the town ; if any citizen should be drafted be- 
fore the quota is filled to pay him the same amount as paid to 
volunteers, and if any person puts in a substitute, and he is 
credited to the town, the same amount shall be paid to him. 
December 17th, The same general arrangement by which to 



460 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

obtain volunteers was authorized to be continued, and it was 
kept up until the end of the war. 

Townsend furnished two hundred and fifty men for the 
war,* which was a surplus of thirty-three over and above all 
demands. Six were commissioned officers. The total amount 
of money raised and expended by the town for war purposes, 
exclusive of State aid, was thirty-seven thousand nine hundred 
and thirty-three dollars ($37,933.00). 

The amount of money raised and appropriated by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $326.38 ; in 
1862, $2,177.82; in 1863, $3,690.40; in 1864, $3,354.29; 
in 1865, $2,300.00. Total amount, $11,848.89. 

The ladies of Townsend furnished eight hundred dollars 
worth of clothing for the soldiers during the war, and in 1863 
sent to the Townsend soldiers, stationed at that time in New 
York, a Thanksgiving dinner. 

Tyngsborough. — Incorporated June 22, 1789. Popula- 
tion in 1860, 626 ; in 1865, 624. Valuation in 1860, $322,- 
680; in 1865, $348,137. 

The selectmen in the years 1861, 1862, and 1863 were 
Ebenezer Swan, Ebenezer Bancroft, Luther Butterfield ; in 
1864, Ebenezer Bancroft, Daniel Parham, Zephaniah Bennett ; 
in 1865, Ebenezer Swan, Zephaniah Bennett^ Luther Butter- 
field. 

The town-clerk in the years 1861 and 1862 was R. S. Co- 
burn ; in 1863 and 1864, W. B. Brinley; in 1865, Francis 
Brinley. The town-treasurer in the years 1861, 1862, and 
1863 was John G. Upton ; in 1864, Samuel A. Richardson ; 
in 1865, Ebenezer Swan. 

But few meetings appear to have been held by the town in 
reference to war matters ; the authorities having them in charge, 
A meeting was held on the 21st of July, 1862, at which it was 

♦ Mr. Adams, the town-clerk, claims that the town furnished two liundred 
and seventy-five men for the war, which we think must be an error, and that 
the above number is correct. Thirty-five were killed or died of disease while in 
the service. 



WALTHAM. 461 

voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer 
for three years, to the number of nine, who should enlist to fill 
the quota of the town. September 16th, The same amount of 
bounty was authorized to be paid to nine months' volunteers. 

1863. April 6th, Five hundred dollars were appropriated to 
pay State aid to soldiers' families, and six hundred and fifty 
dollars for recruiting purposes. 

1864. June 28th, The bounty to be paid to volunteers en- 
listing for three years was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars. On the 18th of August, it was voted to pay that 
amount in gold, 

Tyngsborough furnished sixty-five men for the war, which 
was a surplus of three over and above all demands. None were 
commissioned oflScers. The total amount of money appro- 
priated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was six thousand nine hundred and 
eight dollars ($6,908.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $00; in 
1862, $395.89; in 1863, $516.57 ; in 1864, $758.34 ; in 
1865, $538.02. Total amount, $2,208.82. 

The ladies of Tyngsborough sent at different times two boxes 
of towels, stockings, and other comfortable things to the sol- 
diers at the front. 

Waltham. — Incorporated Jan. 4, 1737. Population in 
1860, 6,397 ; in 1865, 6,897. Valuation in 1860, $4,694,856 ; 
in 1865, $5,552,109. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Samuel B. Whitney, Frederick 
M. Stone, Benjamin Wellington ; in 1862, Frederick M. Stone, 
Benjamin Wellington, Augustus Townsend ; in 1863, Fred- 
erick M. Stone, Horatio Moore, William P. Childs ; in 1864, 
Frederick M. Stone, Benjamin Wellington, Augustus Town- 
send ; in 1865, Frederick M. Stone, Augustus Townsend, O. 
Farns worth. 

The town-clerk during all of these years was Daniel French. 
The town -treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was D. A. Kimball; 



462 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

in 1863, Samuel B. Whitney; in 1864 and 1865, Samuel 
Perry. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters 
relating to the war was held on the 26th of April, at which it 
was voted to give each volunteer belonging to Waltham a uni- 
form, and ten dollars a month for five months when in active 
service, including the " Waltham Light Dragoons." Six thou- 
sand dollars were appropriated for these purposes. It was 
also — 

Resolved^ That if any attempt is made by way of trustee process 
to take from any individual the amount thus voted, the treasurer be 
directed to pay over the sum in disregard of such process, and that the 
selectmen be instructed to insert an article in the warrant for the next 
town-meeting, to see what measures the town will take in reference to 
the party in whose name it is made, and the attorney by whom it is 
instituted. 

July 22, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of volunteers 
as provided by law, and five thousand dollars were appropriated 
for that purpose. 

1862. January 27th, The selectmen reported that ninety- 
eight families, numbering two hundred and ninety-eight persons, 
had applied for and received State aid, and that the sum granted 
in July was exhausted ; whereupon two thousand dollars were 
appropriated for the continuance of the payment of the same. 
July 18th, The selectmen were authorized " to pay a bounty of 
one hundred dollars to each volunteer who enlists in the military 
service for three years and is credited to the quota of the town." 
A committee of thirteen was chosen to assist the selectmen in 
recruiting. August 20th, The same amount of bounty was 
authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months' service. 

1863. August 18th, Voted, to pay State aid to the families 
of drafted men the same as allowed and paid to the families of 
volunteers. November 3d, A committee of five was chosen to 
enlist volunteers to complete the quota of the town under the 
pending call of the President, with power " to incur any neces- 
sary expense." 

1864. April 4th, Three thousand dollars were appropriated 
to pay bounties to twenty-five men to fill the contingent of the 



WATERTOWN. 46 3 

town under the calls of the President of Oct. 17, 1863, and 
Feb. 1, 1864. July 30th, The bounty to three-years volunteers 
was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained 
until the end of the war. 

Waltham furnished seven hundred men for the war, which 
was a surplus of seven over and above all demands. Twenty 
were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was fifty-two thousand five hundred and 
seventy-four dollars ($52,574.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town for 
State aid during the war, and repaid by the Commonwealth, 
was as follows : In 1861, $3,638.74 ; in 1862, $10,973.49 ; in 
1863, $12,206.06 ; in 1864, $10.500.00 ; in 1865, $5,000.00. 
Total amount, $42,318.29. 

Watertown. — Incorporated Jan. 4, 1630. Population in 
1860,3,270; in 1865, 3,779. Valuation in 1860, $2,514,020 ; 
in 1865, $2,757,957. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Joshua Coolidge, Francis Ken- 
dall, Jeremiah Russell ; in 1862, George W. Horn, Joshua G. 
Gooch, George H. Sleeper; in 1863, Artemas Locke, George 
W. Horn, George H. Sleeper ; in 1864 and 1865, George B. 
Wilbur, Joshua G. Gooch, Thomas N. Hooper. 

The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, and 1863 was William H. 
Ingraham; in 1864 and 1865, George L. Noyes. The town- 
treasurer during all the years of the war was Samuel Noyes. 

1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters 
relating to the war was held on the 22d of April. Several 
patriotic speeches were made by the clergymen of the town and 
others, after which it was voted to appropriate five thousand 
dollars to aid in forming a new military company in the town, 
each member of which to be paid thirty dollars if the company 
was accepted for service within a month, and the families to be 
properly provided for. June 11th, Fourteen hundred dollars 
were appropriated for payment of clothing for the company. 
November 5th, Six hundred and sixty-five dollars and ninety- 



464 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

eight cents were appropriated to pay off outstanding claims 
against the company.* 

1862. March 3d, "Voted, to grant eight hundred dollars to 
aid the families of volunteers, if necessary, above the State aid." 
July 10th, Voted, to pay a bounty of seventy-five dollars to 
each volunteer for three years' service when credited to the quota 
of the town. A committee, consisting of the selectmen, town- 
clerk and town-treasurer, the moderator ( Josiah Stickney ) , and 
Ezra Trull, was appointed to collect money to pay in whole or 
in part the said bounty. The treasurer was also authorized to 
borrow twenty-seven hundred dollars for the same purpose. 
Voted, that the town hall be opened every night "to receive 
enlistments and subscriptions." July 17th, The bounty was 
raised to one hundred dollars. August 25th, Five thousand 
one hundred dollars were appropriated to pay bounties to the 
fifty-one volunteers already in camp, " and if any one of them 
be rejected, one hundred dollars be paid to each of their substi- 
tutes." The treasurer was authorized to borrow the money. 
September 13th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars 
to volunteers for nine months' service ; on the 17th it was 
increased fifty dollars. The following letter was read and 
recorded on the town books : — 

Executive ^LkN8I0N, WAsniNOTON, Sept. 5, 1862. 
G. TwiTCHELL, Esq : 

My dear Sir, — I have the hoDor to acknowledge the receipt from 
you of a large amouDt of hospital stores, contributed for the use of the 
wounded soldiers of the United States Army by patriotic citizens of 
Brookline, Brighton, Newton, Watertown, and Roxbury. Have the 
kindness, sir, to accept my cordial thanks for your own courtesy in the 
matter, and convey to the generous donors the assurance of my grateful 
appreciation of their efforts for the health and comfort of those brave 
men to whom we are all so deeply indebted. 

I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. LINCOLN. 



* This companj had its full complement of men in April, and was properly 
provided for bj the town until July 2d, when it was sent to camp at North 
Cambridge. It served through the war as Company K, Sixteenth Regiment 
Massachusetts Volunteers. 



WATERTOWN. 465 

November 4th, The selectmen were authorized to pay one 
hundred dollars to each inhabitant of Watertown who has enlisted 
in the navy, and to pay State aid to their families.* 

1863. March 9th, The selectmen were directed to use their 
own judgment in paying additional State aid to soldiers' families. 
June 18th, Four hundred dollars were appropriated, and a 
committee appointed, to give a proper reception to Company K, 
Fifth Ecgiment Massachusetts Volunteers, on their return from 
nine months' service. November 19th, A committee of ten was 
appointed to cooperate with the selectmen in filling the quota of 
the town. 

1864. April 4th, Seven thousand dollars were appropriated 
to reimburse citizens for money advanced by them for recruiting 
purposes, and also to pay bounties. June 24th, The bounty to 
volunteers for three years' service was fixed at one hundred and 
twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. 
Voted, to raise money to give a proper reception to Company 
K, Sixteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, on its return 
home. Several other meetings were held, but nothing of special 
interest was done. 

Watertown furnished three hundred and ninety-two men for 
the war, which was a surplus of six over and above all demands. 
Fifteen were commissioned oflScers. The money appropriated 
and expended by the town on account of the war was forty-one 
thousand two hundred and five dollars ($41,205.00). 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $1,344.20 ; in 1862, 
$4,048.92; in 1863, $4,400.00; in 1864, $5,200.00; in 1865, 
$3,300.00. Total amount, $18,293.13. 

The ladies of Watertown were not behind their sisters in other 
places in working for the benefit of the soldiers. They held 
meetings weekly during the years of the war, and furnished 
great quantities of garments and useful hospital stores. Those- 
which were acknowledged by the President were chiefly sent by 
the ladies. 

" — ■ T ■ ^—^^^i^.^— ■ I » ■ ■■■I ■ ,. 

*At this time enlistments in the nayy did not count to the quota of a. 
town. 

80 



466 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

Wayland. — Incorporated April 10, 1780. Population in 
1860, 1,188; in 1865, 1,138. Valuation in 1860, $564,758; 
in 1865, $658,073. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were John N. Sherman, 
Thomas J. Damon, William Baldwin ; in 1863, John N. Sher- 
man, Horace Heard, James A. Loker; in 1864, John N. 
Sherman, William C. Grout, Henry R. Newton ; in 1865, 
William C. Grout, Henry R. Newton, James A. Loker. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was Henry Wright. 

1861. Large and enthusiastic meetings of citizens were 
held on the 22d and 23d of April to consider the ^ state of the 
country." After "singing and speaking," it was voted to organ- 
ize and drill a company for military service ; also a company of 
" minute men to practise with the use of weapons, and be ready 
to respond to emergencies." A company of eighty minute- 
men was organized in a few days. Another meeting was held 
on the 1st of May, at which it was — 

Resolved, That we pledge our lives and our property to the cause of 
Liberty, purchased for ua by the blood of our heroic ancestors, that we 
may perpetuate it as the richest legacy which we cau bequeath to our 
children. 

Meetings were held by the citizens at intervals during all the 
years of the war, to raise money for recruiting purposes, and 
to adopt measures for filling the quotas of the town upon the 
several calls of tlie President for soldiers, and to provide for 
the comfort and maintenance of their families. 

Wayland furnished one hundred and twenty-four men for 
the war, wliich was a surplus of eight over and above all de- 
mands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account 
of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirteen thousand five 
hundred and eighty-two dollars ($13,582.00). This includes 
$3,696 which was raised by private subscription and afterwards 
reimbursed by the town. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 



WEST CAMBRIDGE. 467 

Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, $299.42 ; in 1862, 
$1,235.67 ; in 1863, $1,980.96 ; in 1864, $2,258.53 ; in 1865, 
$1,170.00. Total amount, $6,944.58. 

The ladies of Way land, early in the war, organized a Sol- 
diers' Aid Society, " to manifest sympathy with those who are 
engaged in the service of our country, and to aid them to the 
utmost of our power." This society held frequent meetings, at 
which contributions were received and forwarded to the rooms 
of the Sanitary Commission in Boston. Among the articles 
forwarded were 14 blankets^ 53 bed quilts, 88 bed sacks, 79 
sheets, 37 pillows, 455 handkerchiefs, 109 shirts, 44 pairs of 
drawers, 235 pairs of socks ; besides towels, lint, bandages, 
blackberry and currant wine, jellies, preserves, and $253 in 
money. A Soldiers' Relief Society was also formed by them 
*'to keep up a knowledge of the sick and wounded, and to aid 
them when possible." 

West Cambridge.* — Incorporated Feb. 27, 1807. Popu- 
lation in 1860, 2,681 ; in 1865, 2,760. Valuation in 1860, 
$2,449,057 ; in 1865, $2,833,684. 

The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Washington J. Lane, 
Samuel Butterfield, Samuel F. Woodbridge; in 1863, Wash- 
ington J. Lane, Samuel Butterfield, Samuel S. Davis ; in 
1864, Samuel Butterfield, Samuel S. Davis, Reuben Hopkins ; 
in 1865, Samuel Butterfield, Samuel S. Davis, Joseph S. 
Potter. 

The town-clerk and town-treasurer during all the years of 
the war was Abel R. Proctor. 

1861. On Sunday evening, April 21st, the largest meeting 
of citizens that ever assembled in the town was held in the 
town hall, at which measures were taken to form a military 
company for immediate service, and seven thousand dollars 
were voluntarily contributed by citizens for that purpose, six- 
teen hundred of which were contributed by citizens of the 
adjoining town of Belmont. The first legal town-meeting was 
held on the 29th of April, at which ten thousand dollars were 

* Name of town changed to Arlington, April 80, 1867. 



468 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE REBELLION. 

appropriated for the payment of bounties and the support of 
soldiers' families. 

During the entire war the town continued to fill every requi- 
sition made upon it for men. A great many meetings were 
held, at which money was liberally appropriated for the pay- 
ment of bounties and for aid to the families of volunteers. 
Dr. R. L. Hodgdon and Dr. J. C. Harris, resident physicians 
of the town, gave their professional assistance, free of charge, 
to the families of the soldiers. The selectmen acted through 
the entire period as recruiting agents, and were very successful 
in procuring volunteers. A number of citizens' meetings were 
held, at which speeches were made, and money contributed, to 
encoura<^e recruitin^r and maintain the Government. 

West Cambridrre furnished two hundred and ninetv-five men 
for the war, which was a surplus of twenty-one over and above 
all demands. Two were commissioned officers.* The whole 
amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on 
account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was thirty thousand 
and twenty-six dollars and sixty-three cents ($30,020.63). In 
addition to which $32,656.10 were voluntarily contributed by 
the citizens of the town for the same purpose. 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town dur- 
ing the war, for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by the 
Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $441.84; in 1862, 
$2,295.21 ; in 18(53, $2,926.12 ; in 1864, $2,124.00; in 1865, 
$1,455.43. Total amount, $9,242.00. 

The ladies of West Cambridge, at an early period of the war, 
formed an association for the preparation and transmission of 
comfortable articles for the wounded and disabled soldiers in 
the hospitals. They collected the sum of four thousand three 
hundred and fourteen dollars and twenty-six cents ($4,314.26) 
in money, with which they purchased material which they made 
into lint, bandages^ and comfortable garments for the sick and 
wounded. 

* This does not include Captain Ingalls, who. with thirty-two West-Cam- 
bridge men, went to New York and joined the Fortieth Regiment New- York 
Volunteers, and were credited to that State, tlierc being at the time do demand 
for them in Massachusetts. Captain Ingalls was killed in battle. 



WESTON. 469 

Westford. — Incorporated Sept. 23, 1729. Population in 
18G0, 1,624; in 1865, 1,568. Valuation in 1860, $796,440; 
in 1865, $998,438. 

The selectmen in 1861 were John W. P. Abbot, Jacob 
Smith, Eli Tower; in 1862, John W. P. Abbot, Jacob Smith, 
Phinehas Chamberlain ; in 1863 and 1864, John W. P. Abbot, 
Edward Prescott, George B. Dupee ; in 1865 John W. P. 
Abbot, George T. Day, William Reed. 

The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Leonard 
Luce. The town-treasurer during the same period was Sher- 
man D. Fletcher. 

We have not received so full an abstract of the patriotic 
record of Westford as we would have desired. We know, how- 
ever, that it was not behind any town of its size and wealth in 
the Commonwealth, in fulfilling every obligation demanded of it 
by the State or nation during the entire period of the Rebellion. 
Frequent meetings were held, at which money was appropriated 
for the payment of bounties, and for the proper care and com- 
fort of the families of its soldiers. 

Westford furnished one hundred and seventy-two men for 
the war, which was a surplus of fifteen over and above all 
demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount 
of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of 
the war, exclusive of State aid, was twenty-six thousand one 
hundred and eighty dollars and fifty-eight cents ($26,180.58). 

The "amount of money raised and expended by the town 
during the war for State aid to soldiers' families, and repaid by 
the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $488.27; in 
1862, $2,151.60; in 1863, $2,828.00; in 1864, $2,907.50; 
in 1865, $2,150.00. Total amount, $10,525.37. 

The ladies of Westford all through the war were active in 
their efforts and liberal in their contributions for the soldiers in 
the ranks, and for the sick and wounded in the hospitals. 

Weston. — Incorporated Jan. 1, 1712. Population in 
1860, 1,243 ; in 1865, 1,231. Valuation in 1860, $1,016,605 ; 
in 1865, $1,103,274. 

The selectmen in 1861 were Benjamin Pierce, Jr., Alonzo S. 




470 MASSACHUSETTS IN THE BEBELLION. 

Fiskc, Increase Leadbetter, Jr. ; in 1862, Alonzo S. Fiske, 
Increase Leadbetter, Jr., Simeon W. Brown; in 1863, 1864, 
and 18()5, Alonzo S. Fiske, Increase Leadbetter, Jr., Horace 
Hewes. 

The town-clerk during the years 1861, 1862, and 1863 was 
Nathan Hagar; during 1864 and 1865, George W. Cutting. 
The town-treasurer during all of these years was Horace 
Hewes. 

1861. No leffal town-meetinfj to consider matters in reo^ard 
to the war appears to have been held during this year. 

1862. July 19th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a 
bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall 
enlist for three years in the military service, " for the puq>ose of 
crushing the Rebellion," until the quota ** required of this town 
(17) shall be furnished," the bounties to be paid w^hen the 
men were mustered into the service and credited. August 2d, 
Voted, to give each volunteer, "to the number of Weston's 
quota," an additional hundred dollars who shall enlist within ten 
days ; also to give each volunteer ten dollars " for each indi- 
vidual he may induce to join the military service as part of this 
town's quota." August 19th, Voted, to give a bounty of two 
hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months' service who 
shall enlist and be credited to the town within ten days. Another 
meeting was held on the 29th of August, in regard to the same 
matter. September 29th, The selectmen were directed " to 
enlist five more volunteers." It was also — 

JResolveiU That whereas we have learned that Kalph A. Jones, one 
of our volunteers has fallen iu battle, and that others are known to be 
wounded; therefore — 

Resolved, That Rev. Calvin H. Topliffe be requested to proceed to 
Maryland and recover, if possible, the body of said Ilalph A. Jones, or 
of any others who have since died; and further, to attend to the wants 
of the wounded men suffering in any of the hospitals ; that in case of 
tlie death of any volunteer forming part of tlie town's quota, whose 
family is entitled to State aid, the same shall be continued by the 
town. 

November 4th, Eev. Calvin H. Topliffe was appointed to bring 
home the bodies of any volunteers who have fallen, or may fall 



WILMINGTON. 471 

in battle, if practicable, and to render any assistance necessary to 
our sick or wounded soldiers ; and the selectmen were authorized 
to draw their order upon the treasurer for the expense. 

Weston furnished one hundred and thirty-one men for the 
war, which was a surplus of fifteen over and above all demands. 
Six were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money 
appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, 
exclusive of State aid, was twelve thousand five hundred and 
twenty-eight dollars and ninety cents ($12,528.90). In addi- 
tion to this sum, five thousand one hundred and four dollars 
and ninety-five cents were raised by the citizens by subscrip- 
tion to encourage recruiting and the payment of bounties.* 

The amount of money raised and expended by the town 
for State aid to soldiers' families during the war, and repaid 
by the Commonwealth, was as follows : In 1861, 00 ; in 1862, 
$407.48; in 1863, $998.68; in 1864, $702.50; in 1865, 
$250.00. Total amount, $2,358.66. 

Wilmington. — Incorporated Sept. 25,